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BookDOI

Women in European Holocaust Films

01 Jan 2017-
About: The article was published on 2017-01-01. It has received 5 citations till now.
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Following a century filled with violations of human rights, a significant number of documentary films have appeared since the first decade of the current century that report these events as mentioned in this paper, and a number of them have been published since the early 1990s.
Abstract: Following a century filled with violations of human rights, a significant number of documentary films have appeared since the first decade of the current century that report these events. Tradition...

14 citations


Cites background from "Women in European Holocaust Films"

  • ...Ingrid Lewis also covered this extensive period in another monograph published in 2017, but in her case the object of study is fiction films made in Europe, and she focuses on the cinematic depiction of women as perpetrators, victims and resisters (Lewis, 2017)....

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In recent years, the number of diverse forms of cultural productions focused on the perpetrators has increased significantly eliciting thus a turn toward this problematic figure as mentioned in this paper, and the originality of...
Abstract: In recent years the number of diverse forms of cultural productions focused on the perpetrators has increased significantly eliciting thus a turn toward this problematic figure. The originality of ...

12 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2020
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss the figure of Manoel de Oliveira, the renowned Portuguese auteur whose filmmaking career spanned from 1931 to 2015, focusing on Belle Toujours (2006), Eccentricities of a Blonde-Haired Girl (2009), and The Strange Case of Angelica (2010).
Abstract: This chapter discusses the figure of Manoel de Oliveira, the renowned Portuguese auteur whose filmmaking career spanned from 1931 to 2015. Lewis and Sever Globan argue that Oliveira’s longevity and prolific career allowed him to carry into the twenty-first century a set of female representations which can be considered highly problematic in the context of contemporary society. By focusing on Belle Toujours (2006), Eccentricities of a Blonde-Haired Girl (2009) and The Strange Case of Angelica (2010), the chapter explains how Oliveira’s recent films set in place an intricate process of reviving a regressive patriarchal auteurism which is performed through mechanisms of male identification, male gaze and a strong voyeuristic element.

1 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2020
TL;DR: The authors argue that contemporary counter-narratives demonstrate that films are much more than (re)presentations of history: they can function as important interventions in their own right, which challenge and re-interrogate history's gender biases.
Abstract: Lewis signals a representational shift in twenty-first-century Holocaust cinema that breaks with previous, stereotyped, imagery of women and assigns them a central, privileged, authorial position from which to tell their stories. The chapter discusses some of the most relevant examples of this cycle of films, namely, Nina’s Journey (Lena Einhorn, 2005) and Remembrance (Anna Justice, 2011) and The Birch-Tree Meadow (Marceline Loridan-Ivens, 2003), among others. In particular, it explains how recent films engage with concepts of trauma and vicarious witnessing, while recovering women’s voices and memories in their diversity and uniqueness. As the chapter contends, these contemporary counter-narratives demonstrate that films are much more than (re)presentations of history: they can function as important interventions in their own right, which challenge and re-interrogate history’s gender biases.
Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2020
TL;DR: Murtic as discussed by the authors examines the contemporary post-Yugoslav war film, contextualizing it historically, and in light of the emergence of new film paradigms across post Yugoslav territories, wherein films are characterised by a rediscovered nationalism and a sense of victimhood, or the confirmation of stereotypes of barbarism and violence.
Abstract: This chapter examines the contemporary post-Yugoslav war film, contextualising it historically, and in light of the emergence of new film paradigms across post-Yugoslav territories. Tendencies such as the cinemas of ‘self-victimisation’ or ‘self-Balkanisation’ described by Jurica Pavicic (Postjugoslavenski film. Stil i ideologija. Zagreb: Hrvatsko filmski savez, 2011) are examined, wherein films are characterised by, respectively, a rediscovered nationalism and a sense of victimhood, or the confirmation of stereotypes of barbarism and violence. Murtic then considers the notion of ‘normalisation’ (Pavicic, Postjugoslavenski film. Stil i ideologija. Zagreb: Hrvatsko filmski savez, 2011) and its creation of an integrative space facilitating reflection on war and post-war narratives across common ground, as well as in the emergence of female directors constructing an alternative to patriarchal societies across post-Yugoslavia. Taking as its central case study, Kristian Milic’s The Living and the Dead (2007), a film which displays all the dominant characteristics of the post-Yugoslav war genre, it examines the demilitarisation of men in the context of the historical entrenchment of militaristic discourse(s) and the predominantly anti-war stance of post-Yugoslav war cinema.