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Working with Emotional Intelligence

01 Jan 1998-

Abstract: In Working with Emotional Intelligence,Goleman reveals the skills that distinguish star performers in every field, form entry-level jobs to top executive positions. He shows that the single most important factor is not IQ, advanced degrees, or technical expertise, but the quality Goleman calls emotional intelligence. self-awareness, self-confidence, and self-control; commitment and integrity; the ability to communicate and influence, to initiate and accept change--these competencies are at a premium in today's job market.
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Journal ArticleDOI
Chi-Sum Wong1, Kenneth S. Law2Institutions (2)
Abstract: Recently, increasing numbers of scholars have argued that emotional intelligence (EI) is a core variable that affects the performance of leaders. In this study, we develop a psychometrically sound and practically short EI measure that can be used in leadership and management studies. We also provide exploratory evidence for the effects of the EI of both leaders and followers on job outcomes. Applying Gross' emotion regulation model, we argue that the EI of leaders and followers should have positive effects on job performance and attitudes. We also propose that the emotional labor of the job moderates the EI–job outcome relationship. Our results show that the EI of followers affects job performance and job satisfaction, while the EI of leaders affects their satisfaction and extra-role behavior. For followers, the proposed interaction effects between EI and emotional labor on job performance, organizational commitment, and turnover intention are also supported.

2,432 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Fred Luthans1Institutions (1)
Abstract: This essay draws from the emerging positive psychology movement and the author's recent articles on the need for and meaning of a positive approach to organizational behavior Specifically, the argument is made that at this time, the OB field needs a proactive, positive approach emphasizing strengths, rather than continuing in the downward spiral of negativity trying to fix weaknesses However, to avoid the surface positivity represented by the non-sustainable best-sellers, the case is made for positive organizational behavior (POB) to take advantage of the OB field's strength of being theory and research driven Additional criteria for this version of POB are to identify unique, state-like psychological capacities that can not only be validly measured, but also be open to development and performance management Confidence, hope, and resiliency are offered as meeting such POB inclusion criteria The overall intent of the essay is to generate some positive thinking and excitement for the OB field and ‘hopefully’ stimulate some new theory building, research, and effective application Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

2,150 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: (2004). TARGET ARTICLES: 'Emotional Intelligence: Theory, Findings, and Implications' Psychological Inquiry: Vol. 15, No. 3, pp. 197-215.

1,735 citations


Journal Article
Reuben M. Baron1Institutions (1)
31 Dec 2006-Psicothema
TL;DR: The author summarizes the key points, discusses the limitations of the model, and raises the ideas for developing a future model of ESI.
Abstract: The present manuscript is an empirically based theoretical paper that presents, describes, and examines the Bar-On Model of Emotional-Social Intelligence (ESI) in deep. First, a description of the Emotional Quotient Inventory (the EQ-i), which has played an instrumental role in developing the model, is given. The EQ-i is a self-report measure of emotionally and socially intelligent behaviour. It has been translated into more than 30 languages, and data have been collected around the world. The impact of age, gender, and ethnicity on the Bar-On model is presented. A description of the model's construct and predictive validity is given. Finally, the author summarizes the key points, discusses the limitations of the model, and raises the ideas for developing a future model of ESI.

1,481 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Monica C. Higgins1, Kathy E. Kram2Institutions (2)
TL;DR: A typology of “developmental networks” is introduced using core concepts from social networks theory—network diversity and tie strength—to view mentoring as a multiple relationship phenomenon.
Abstract: We introduce social networks theory and methods as a way of understanding mentoring in the current career context. We iirst introduce a typology of “developmental networks” using core concepts from social networks theory—network diversity and tie strength—to view mentoring as a multiple relationship phenomenon. We then propose a framework illustrating factors that shape developmental network structures and offer propositions focusing on the developmental consequences for individuals having different types of developmental networks in their careers. We conclude with strategies both for testing our propositions and for researching multiple developmental relationships further.

1,390 citations


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No. of citations received by the Paper in previous years
YearCitations
20223
2021106
2020131
2019152
2018194
2017236