scispace - formally typeset

Journal ArticleDOI

‘World-class’ fantasies: A neocolonial analysis of international branch campuses:

01 Jan 2019-Organization (SAGE PublicationsSage UK: London, England)-Vol. 26, Iss: 1, pp 75-97

AbstractIn this article, we build on postcolonial studies and discourse analytical research exploring how the ‘world-class’ discourse as an ideology and a fantasy structures neocolonial relations in intern...

...read more


Citations
More filters
Posted Content
Abstract: Drawing on postcolonial studies of management, this article highlights the importance of adopting a contextualized approach to hybridization processes that, first, takes into account the importance of the historical and cultural contexts from which hybridity emerges and, second, helps to identify the elements that change as well as those that persist when western management practices are imported into developing countries. Using a discursive analysis, this article shows the ambivalent nature of the accounts given by managers (trained in western traditions) of the Tunisian company Poulina as they explain how they modernized their company through the implementation of a US management model. The managers' ambivalence takes on two distinct forms. First, while they seem to have internalized the rhetoric of modernization in insisting on how they used the US management model to overcome the 'dysfunctional' family-based organizational system, they simultaneously express resistance by detaching themselves from the French colonial organizational model. Second, when they describe the implementation of the US management practices and how workers resisted them, it seems that they have implicitly negotiated and reinterpreted these practices via a local cultural framework of meaning. Based on these findings, I argue that hybridity is best understood as an interweaving of two elements - the transformation of practices and cultural continuity - in which identity construction, local power dynamics and cultural frameworks of meaning jointly shape the hybridization process of management practices.

73 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: The concept of the gaze plays an important role in (post)colonial organizational analysis. It addresses dynamics of looking and being seen, particularly as they pertain to knowledge and identity. D...

14 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to discover how higher education institutions may segment the market in a competitive higher education hub and to assess the usefulness of strategic group analysis as an analytical technique for market and competitor analysis. As a case example of a competitive higher education market, this research investigates how higher education institutions in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) position themselves and compete with one another.,The research relied mainly on secondary data, which were obtained from the websites of institutions and regulatory bodies. Then, hierarchical cluster analysis was used to identify strategic groups and institutional competitive strategies in the UAE higher education market. A panel of experts helped interpret and explain the cluster results.,Eight distinct institutional clusters were identified, which include public- and privately-owned institutions, as well as elite and specialist institutions. Institution and programme accreditation were found to be particularly important in the UAE market. The institutions in each group appear to operate in a particular market segment, targeting students who have similar needs and wants, and who often share similar demographic features.,It is concluded that strategic group analysis may help institutions to evaluate potential markets, select target segments and develop competitive strategies. In the UAE market context, the results demonstrate how institutions may position themselves to create strong and distinctive identities. The results of the research may be of interest to higher education institutions that operate in competitive markets, and particularly those that want to evaluate foreign markets.,This is believed to be the first study to use a strategic group approach for analysing competitors in a higher education hub.

12 citations


References
More filters
01 Jan 2012
Abstract: Acknowledgements, Introduction: Locations of culture, 1. The commitment to theory, 2. Interrogating identity: Frantz Fanon and the postcolonial prerogative, 3. The other question: Stereotype, discrimination and the discourse of colonialism, 4. Of mimicry and man: The ambivalence of colonial discourse, 5. Sly civility, 6. Signs taken for wonders: Questions of ambivalence and authority under a tree outside Delhi, May 1817, 7. Articulating the archaic: Cultural difference and colonial nonsense, 8. DissemiNation: Time, narrative and the margins of the modern nation, 9. The postcolonial and the postmodern: The question of agency, 10. By bread alone: Signs of violence in the mid-nineteenth century, 11. How newness enters the world: Postmodern space, postcolonial times and the trials of cultural translation, 12. Conclusion: 'Race', time and the revision of modernity, Notes, Index.

17,643 citations

Book
01 Jan 1972
Abstract: Now welcome, the most inspiring book today from a very professional writer in the world, archaeology of knowledge and the discourse on language. This is the book that many people in the world waiting for to publish. After the announced of this book, the book lovers are really curious to see how this book is actually. Are you one of them? That's very proper. You may not be regret now to seek for this book to read.

4,097 citations


"‘World-class’ fantasies: A neocolon..." refers background in this paper

  • ...…by an understanding of discourse as collections of interrelated texts and practices that ‘systematically form the object of which they speak’ (Foucault, 1972: 49) and of how individuals then participate and (re)produce the discursive practices that are the condition and consequence of…...

    [...]

Book
01 Jan 1989
Abstract: In this provocative and original work, Slavoj Zizek takes a look at the question of human agency in a postmodern world. From the sinking of the Titanic to Hitchcock's Rear Window, from the operas of Wagner to science fiction, from Alien to the Jewish Joke, the author's acute analyses explore the ideological fantasies of wholeness and exclusion which make up human society. Zizek takes issue with analysts of the postmodern condition from Habermas to Sloterdijk, showing that the idea of a 'post-ideological' world ignores the fact that 'even if we do not take things seriously, we are still doing them'. Rejecting postmodernism's unified world of surfaces, he traces a line of thought from Hegel to Althusser and Lacan, in which the human subject is split, divided by a deep antagonism which determines social reality and through which ideology operates. Linking key psychoanalytical and philosophical concepts to social phenomena such as totalitarianism and racism, the book explores the political significance of these fantasies of control. In so doing, The Sublime Object of Ideology represents a powerful contribution to a psychoanalytical theory of ideology, as well as offering persuasive interpretations of a number of contemporary cultural formations.

3,569 citations


"‘World-class’ fantasies: A neocolon..." refers background in this paper

  • ...We approach the world-class discourse as an ideology and a fantasy that not only constructs us as subjects but is parallel to the way ideologies interpolate us and structure neocolonial relations (Žižek, 1998)....

    [...]

  • ...Thus, as fantasies seek to dispel the incoherency in the other (Žižek, 1998), we also find that organizational fantasies further seek to dispel the incoherency in oneself....

    [...]

  • ...In organization studies, this type of activity has been discussed as a form of cynical resistance, meaning that people somehow know they are embracing and seeking to fulfil an illusion yet continue to act accordingly (Fleming and Spicer, 2003; Žižek, 1998)....

    [...]

  • ...We argue that the power of the world-class discourse is embedded in its rhetoric and imaginary, which create a fantasy, that is, a positivized construction of impossible fullness (Žižek, 1998: 100)....

    [...]

  • ...Nevertheless, the claim of knowing the Other is based on an imaginary and the fantasy of coherency is destabilized because of the presence of the Other (Lok and Willmott, 2014; Žižek, 1998)....

    [...]

Book
16 Dec 2011
Abstract: During the Renaissance and the Enlightenment, coloniality emerged as a new structure of power as Europeans colonized the Americas and built on the ideas of Western civilization and modernity as the endpoints of historical time and Europe as the center of the world. Walter D. Mignolo argues that coloniality is the darker side of Western modernity, a complex matrix of power that has been created and controlled by Western men and institutions from the Renaissance, when it was driven by Christian theology, through the late twentieth century and the dictates of neoliberalism. This cycle of coloniality is coming to an end. Two main forces are challenging Western leadership in the early twenty-first century. One of these, “dewesternization,” is an irreversible shift to the East in struggles over knowledge, economics, and politics. The second force is “decoloniality.” Mignolo explains that decoloniality requires delinking from the colonial matrix of power underlying Western modernity to imagine and build global futures in which human beings and the natural world are no longer exploited in the relentless quest for wealth accumulation.

1,107 citations


"‘World-class’ fantasies: A neocolon..." refers background in this paper

  • ...…be heard in order to disrupt neocolonialist practices and bring the periphery to the centre of academic discussion and theory formation (e.g. Alcadipani et al., 2012; Alcadipani and Faria, 2014; Ibarra-Colado, 2006; Mignolo, 2011; Mir and Mir, 2013; Özkazanç-Pan, 2008; Westwood et al., 2014)....

    [...]

Book
Jamil Salmi1
01 Jan 2009
Abstract: Governments are becoming increasingly aware of the important contribution that high performance, world-class universities make to global competitiveness and economic growth. There is growing recognition, in both industrial and developing countries, of the need to establish one or more world-class universities that can compete effectively with the best of the best around the world. Contextualising the drive for world-class higher education institutions and the power of international and domestic university rankings, this book outlines possible strategies and pathways for establishing globally competitive universities and explores the challenges, costs, and risks involved. Its findings will be of particular interest to policy makers, university leaders, researchers, and development practitioners.

864 citations


"‘World-class’ fantasies: A neocolon..." refers background in this paper

  • ...The world-class discourse seeks to signal educational institutions’ value in the global higher education network, suggesting that the institution would then be a part of a group of educational elite (Salmi, 2009)....

    [...]