scispace - formally typeset
Topic

Activities of daily living

About: Activities of daily living is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 18201 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 592825 citation(s). The topic is also known as: activity of daily life & ADL.

...read more

Papers
  More

Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1093/GERONT/9.3_PART_1.179
21 Sep 1969-Gerontologist
Abstract: THE use of formal devices for assessing function is becoming standard in agencies serving the elderly. In the Gerontological Society's recent contract study on functional assessment (Howell, 1968), a large assortment of rating scales, checklists, and other techniques in use in applied settings was easily assembled. The present state of the trade seems to be one in which each investigator or practitioner feels an inner compusion to make his own scale and to cry that other existent scales cannot possibly fit his own setting. The authors join this company in presenting two scales first standardized on their own population (Lawton, 1969). They take some comfort, however, in the fact that one scale, the Physical Self-Maintenance Scale (PSMS), is largely a scale developed and used by other investigators (Lowenthal, 1964), which was adapted for use in our own institution. The second of the scales, the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale (IADL), taps a level of functioning heretofore inadequately represented in attempts to assess everyday functional competence. Both of the scales have been tested further for their usefulness in a variety of types of institutions and other facilities serving community-resident older people. Before describing in detail the behavior measured by these two scales, we shall briefly describe the schema of competence into which these behaviors fit (Lawton, 1969). Human behavior is viewed as varying in the degree of complexity required for functioning in a variety of tasks. The lowest level is called life maintenance, followed by the successively more complex levels of func-

...read more

Topics: Activities of daily living (52%), Population (52%)

13,237 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1097/00006199-197005000-00029
01 May 1970-Nursing Research
Abstract: THE use of formal devices for assessing function is becoming standard in agencies serving the elderly In the Gerontological Society's recent contract study on functional assessment (Howell, 1968), a large assortment of rating scales, checklists, and other techniques in use in applied settings was easily assembled The present state of the trade seems to be one in which each investigator or practitioner feels an inner compusion to make his own scale and to cry that other existent scales cannot possibly fit his own setting The authors join this company in presenting two scales first standardized on their own population (Lawton, 1969) They take some comfort, however, in the fact that one scale, the Physical Self-Maintenance Scale (PSMS), is largely a scale developed and used by other investigators (Lowenthal, 1964), which was adapted for use in our own institution The second of the scales, the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale (IADL), taps a level of functioning heretofore inadequately represented in attempts to assess everyday functional competence Both of the scales have been tested further for their usefulness in a variety of types of institutions and other facilities serving community-resident older people Before describing in detail the behavior measured by these two scales, we shall briefly describe the schema of competence into which these behaviors fit (Lawton, 1969) Human behavior is viewed as varying in the degree of complexity required for functioning in a variety of tasks The lowest level is called life maintenance, followed by the successively more complex levels of func-

...read more

Topics: Activities of daily living (52%), Population (52%)

5,081 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1056/NEJM199503023320902
Abstract: Background Functional assessment is an important part of the evaluation of elderly persons. We conducted this study to determine whether objective measures of physical function can predict subsequent disability in older persons. Methods This prospective cohort study included men and women 71 years of age or older who were living in the community, who reported no disability in the activities of daily living, and who reported that they were able to walk one-half mile (0.8 km) and climb stairs without assistance. The subjects completed a short battery of physical-performance tests and participated in a follow-up interview four years later. The tests included an assessment of standing balance, a timed 8-ft (2.4-m) walk at a normal pace, and a timed test of five repetitions of rising from a chair and sitting down. Results Among the 1122 subjects who were not disabled at base line and who participated in the four-year follow-up, lower scores on the base-line performance tests were associated with a statisticall...

...read more

Topics: Activities of daily living (51%), Sitting (51%)

3,126 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.JALZ.2013.02.003
Abstract: This report provides information to increase understanding of the public health impact of Alzheimer's disease (AD), including incidence and prevalence, mortality rates, health expenditures and costs of care, and effect on caregivers and society in general. It also explores the roles and unique challenges of long‐distance caregivers, as well as interventions that target those challenges. An estimated 5.2 million Americans have AD. Approximately 200,000 people younger than 65 years with AD comprise the younger onset AD population; 5 million comprise the older onset AD population. Throughout the coming decades, the baby boom generation is projected to add about 10 million to the total number of people in the United States with AD. Today, someone in America develops AD every 68 seconds. By 2050, one new case of AD is expected to develop every 33 seconds, or nearly a million new cases per year, and the total estimated prevalence is expected to be 13.8 million. AD is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and the fifth leading cause of death in Americans age 65 years or older. Between 2000 and 2010, the proportion of deaths resulting from heart disease, stroke, and prostate cancer decreased 16%, 23%, and 8%, respectively, whereas the proportion resulting from AD increased 68%. The number of deaths from AD as determined by official death certificates (83,494 in 2010) likely underrepresents the number of AD‐related deaths in the United States. A projected 450,000 older Americans with AD will die in 2013, and a large proportion will die as a result of complications of AD. In 2012, more than 15 million family members and other unpaid caregivers provided an estimated 17.5 billion hours of care to people with AD and other dementias, a contribution valued at more than $216 billion. Medicare payments for services to beneficiaries age 65 years and older with AD and other dementias are three times as great as payments for beneficiaries without these conditions, and Medicaid payments are 19 times as great. Total payments in 2013 for health care, long‐term care, and hospice services for people age 65 years and older with dementia are expected to be $203 billion (not including the contributions of unpaid caregivers). An estimated 2.3 million caregivers of people with AD and other dementias live at least 1 hour away from the care recipient. These “long‐distance caregivers” face unique challenges, including difficulty in assessing the care recipient's true health condition and needs, high rates of family disagreement regarding caregiving decisions, and high out‐of‐pocket expenses for costs related to caregiving. Out‐of‐pocket costs for long‐distance caregivers are almost twice as high as for local caregivers.

...read more

Topics: Dementia (56%), Activities of daily living (56%), Public health (54%) ...read more

2,899 Citations


Open accessJournal Article
Abstract: This study assessed the validity of the Balance Scale by examining: how Scale scores related to clinical judgements and self-perceptions of balance, laboratory measures of postural sway and external criteria reflecting balancing ability; if scores could predict falls in the elderly; and how they related to motor and functional performance in stroke patients. Elderly residents (N = 113) were assessed for functional performance and balance regularly over a nine-month period. Occurrence of falls was monitored for a year. Acute stroke patients (N = 70) were periodically rated for functional independence, motor performance and balance for over three months. Thirty-one elderly subjects were assessed by clinical and laboratory indicators reflecting balancing ability. The Scale correlated moderately with caregiver ratings, self-ratings and laboratory measures of sway. Differences in mean Scale scores were consistent with the use of mobility aids by elderly residents and differentiated stroke patients by location of follow-up. Balance scores predicted the occurrence of multiple falls among elderly residents and were strongly correlated with functional and motor performance in stroke patients.

...read more

Topics: Berg Balance Scale (63%), Balance (ability) (59%), Activities of daily living (51%) ...read more

2,532 Citations


Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20225
20211,076
2020981
2019900
2018877
2017932

Top Attributes

Show by:

Topic's top 5 most impactful authors

Johanne Desrosiers

23 papers, 1.3K citations

Thomas M. Gill

17 papers, 3.1K citations

Ingalill Rahm Hallberg

17 papers, 1K citations

Gertrudis I. J. M. Kempen

16 papers, 751 citations

Kenneth E. Covinsky

16 papers, 1.4K citations

Network Information
Related Topics (5)
Rehabilitation

46.2K papers, 776.3K citations

91% related
Quality of life

42.9K papers, 1.1M citations

88% related
Psychological intervention

82.6K papers, 2.6M citations

87% related
Dementia

72.2K papers, 2.7M citations

86% related
Evidence-based practice

22.9K papers, 665.8K citations

86% related