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Admission control

About: Admission control is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 7803 publications have been published within this topic receiving 127528 citations.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper proposes and develops a link-layer channel model termed effective capacity (EC), which first model a wireless link by two EC functions, namely, the probability of nonempty buffer, and the QoS exponent of a connection, and proposes a simple and efficient algorithm to estimate these EC functions.
Abstract: To facilitate the efficient support of quality of service (QoS) in next-generation wireless networks, it is essential to model a wireless channel in terms of connection-level QoS metrics such as data rate, delay, and delay-violation probability. However, the existing wireless channel models, i.e., physical-layer channel models, do not explicitly characterize a wireless channel in terms of these QoS metrics. In this paper, we propose and develop a link-layer channel model termed effective capacity (EC). In this approach, we first model a wireless link by two EC functions, namely, the probability of nonempty buffer, and the QoS exponent of a connection. Then, we propose a simple and efficient algorithm to estimate these EC functions. The physical-layer analogs of these two link-layer EC functions are the marginal distribution (e.g., Rayleigh-Ricean distribution) and the Doppler spectrum, respectively. The key advantages of the EC link-layer modeling and estimation are: 1) ease of translation into QoS guarantees, such as delay bounds; 2) simplicity of implementation; and 3) accuracy, and hence, efficiency in admission control and resource reservation. We illustrate the advantage of our approach with a set of simulation experiments, which show that the actual QoS metric is closely approximated by the QoS metric predicted by the EC link-layer model, under a wide range of conditions.

1,469 citations

Book
12 Dec 2003
TL;DR: A Decentralized Solution Relationship to Current Internet Protocols and Global Stability for a Single Link and Single Flow Stochastic Models and Their Deterministic Limits Connection-level Models Real-Time Sources and Distributed Admission Control.
Abstract: Preface Introduction Resource Allocation Congestion Control: A Decentralized Solution Relationship to Current Internet Protocols Linear Analysis with Delay: The Single Link Case Linear Analysis with Delay: The Network Case Global Stability for a Single Link and Single Flow Stochastic Models and Their Deterministic Limits Connection-level Models Real-Time Sources and Distributed Admission Control Conclusions References Index

951 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Oct 1992
TL;DR: This paper considers the support of real-time applications in an Integrated Services Packet Network (ISPN), and proposes an ISPN architecture that supports two distinct kinds of real time service: guaranteed service, which involves pre-computed worst-case delay bounds, and predicted service which uses the measure performance of the network in computing delay bounds.
Abstract: This paper considers the support of real-time applications in an Integrated Services Packet Network (ISPN). We first review the characteristics of real-time applications. We observe that, contrary to the popular view that real-time applications necessarily require a fixed delay bound, some real-time applications are more flexible and can adapt to current network conditions. We then propose an ISPN architecture that supports two distinct kinds of real-time service: guaranteed service, which is the traditional form of real-time service discussed in most of the literature and involves pre-computed worst-case delay bounds, and predicted service which uses the measure performance of the network in computing delay bounds. We then propose a packet scheduling mechanism that can support both of these real-time services as well as accommodate datagram traffic. We also discuss two other aspects of an overall ISPN architecture: the service interface and the admission control criteria.

919 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This work presents a systematic method of distributed algorithms for power control that is geometric-programming-based and shows that in the high Signal-to- interference Ratios (SIR) regime, these nonlinear and apparently difficult, nonconvex optimization problems can be transformed into convex optimized problems in the form of geometric programming.
Abstract: In wireless cellular or ad hoc networks where Quality of Service (QoS) is interference-limited, a variety of power control problems can be formulated as nonlinear optimization with a system-wide objective, e.g., maximizing the total system throughput or the worst user throughput, subject to QoS constraints from individual users, e.g., on data rate, delay, and outage probability. We show that in the high Signal-to- interference Ratios (SIR) regime, these nonlinear and apparently difficult, nonconvex optimization problems can be transformed into convex optimization problems in the form of geometric programming; hence they can be very efficiently solved for global optimality even with a large number of users. In the medium to low SIR regime, some of these constrained nonlinear optimization of power control cannot be turned into tractable convex formulations, but a heuristic can be used to compute in most cases the optimal solution by solving a series of geometric programs through the approach of successive convex approximation. While efficient and robust algorithms have been extensively studied for centralized solutions of geometric programs, distributed algorithms have not been explored before. We present a systematic method of distributed algorithms for power control that is geometric-programming-based. These techniques for power control, together with their implications to admission control and pricing in wireless networks, are illustrated through several numerical examples.

906 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Numerical results show that the proposed scheme can significantly improve the performance of the hybrid system in terms of D2D access rate and the overall network throughput.
Abstract: In cellular networks, proximity users may communicate directly without going through the base station, which is called Device-to-device (D2D) communications and it can improve spectral efficiency. However, D2D communications may generate interference to the existing cellular networks if not designed properly. In this paper, we study a resource allocation problem to maximize the overall network throughput while guaranteeing the quality-of-service (QoS) requirements for both D2D users and regular cellular users (CUs). A three-step scheme is proposed. It first performs admission control and then allocates powers for each admissible D2D pair and its potential CU partners. Next, a maximum weight bipartite matching based scheme is developed to select a suitable CU partner for each admissible D2D pair to maximize the overall network throughput. Numerical results show that the proposed scheme can significantly improve the performance of the hybrid system in terms of D2D access rate and the overall network throughput. The performance of D2D communications depends on D2D user locations, cell radius, the numbers of active CUs and D2D pairs, and the maximum power constraint for the D2D pairs.

833 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202311
202220
2021102
2020134
2019156
2018153