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Anacardiaceae

About: Anacardiaceae is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 364 publications have been published within this topic receiving 5966 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The seasonal variation of the essential oil composition, the antioxidant activity (DPPH, FRAP assays) and the total phenolic content (Folin-Ciocalteu assay) of two aromatic wild plants, Pistacia lentiscus L. (Anacardiaceae), grown in Zakynthos, a Greek island, was investigated.

351 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Sixteen phenolic compounds isolated from the cashew Anacardium occidentale (Anacardiaceae) nut shell oil exhibited potent antibacterial activity against only Gram-positive bacteria, among which Streptococcus mutans and Propionibacterium acnes were the most sensitive bacteria.
Abstract: Sixteen phenolic compounds have been isolated from the cashew Anacardium occidentale (Anacardiaceae) nut shell oil. Their antimicrobial activity has been tested against four typical microorganisms, Bacillus subtilis, a Gram-positive bacterium; Escherichia coli, a Gram-negative bacterium; Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a yeast; and Penicillium chrysogenum, a mold. Most of them exhibited potent antibacterial activity against only Gram-positive bacteria, among which Streptococcus mutans, one of several bacteria responsible for tooth decay, and Propionibacterium acnes, one of the bacteria responsible for acne, were the most sensitive bacteria. Anacardic acids also showed weak activity against molds. Their structure-activity relationships are also described.

224 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A quantitative study of the phenolic constituents of wild and cultivated leaves of Sclerocarya birrea(Anacardiaceae) led to the isolation of one new flavonol glycoside, quercetin 3-O-alpha-l-(5' '-galloyl)-arabinofuranoside, and eight known phenolic compounds.
Abstract: A quantitative study of the phenolic constituents of wild and cultivated leaves of Sclerocarya birrea(Anacardiaceae) was carried out by HPLC-UV/PDA and LC-MS. Phytochemical analysis of the methanol extract of wild plants led to the isolation of one new flavonol glycoside, quercetin 3-O-alpha-l-(5' '-galloyl)-arabinofuranoside (1), and eight known phenolic compounds; two epicatechin derivatives were also isolated from the same extract of the cultivated species. The antioxidant activity of all isolated compounds was determined by measuring free radical scavenging effects using the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity assay and the coupled oxidation of beta-carotene and linoleic acid (autoxidation assay).

162 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Three anacardic acids have been isolated as cytotoxic agents against BT-20 breast carcinoma cells from the cashew Anacardium occidentale (Anacardiaceae) apple juice.
Abstract: Three anacardic acids (1-3) have been isolated as cytotoxic agents against BT-20 breast carcinoma cells from the cashew Anacardium occidentale (Anacardiaceae) apple juice. In addition to these anacardic acids, the cytotoxicity of their 13 congeners (4-16) isolated from the cashew nut and nut shell oil has also been examined. Anacardic acids (1-4), cardols (5-8), and methylcardols (9-12) have been found to exhibit moderate cytotoxic activity against both BT-20 breast and HeLa epithelioid cervix carcinoma cells

162 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In laboratory host preference studies, mango and banana were found to be the most preferred host plants among the nine cultivated plant species tested, which evidently ensure that sufficient reproductive bases exist for B. invadens during the off-season when the cultivated hosts are not in fruiting.
Abstract: Bactrocera invadens Drew, Tsuruta & White (Diptera: Tephritidae), an invasive fruit fly species of Asian origin, was detected in Kenya in 2003, and is now well established in several parts of the country. We assessed the host range of this major quarantine pest in Kenya by collecting a wide range of cultivated and wild host plants from December 2004 to April 2006. Fruit were collected from 90 plant species representing 40 families from the Coast, Eastern, and Rift Valley provinces of the country where the fly population had been observed to occur in large numbers and where fruit and vegetable production is predominant. Fourteen plant species, among them cultivated and wild fruiting species, were found to be hosts of B. invadens. Fruit of mango, Mangifera indica L. (Anacardiaceae); banana Musa sp. AAA (Musaceae); and citrus [Citrus limon (L.) Burm.f. (lemon), Citrus reticulata Blanco (tangerine), and Citrus sinensis (sweet orange) (all Rutaceae)], were among the cultivated species heavily infested by B. invadens. Marula Sclerocarya birrea (A.Rich) Hochst. (Anacardiaceae) and Terminalia catappa L. (Combretaceae) were found to be the most infested noncultivated plants. These wild plants evidently ensure that sufficient reproductive bases exist for B. invadens during the off-season when the cultivated hosts are not in fruiting. In laboratory host preference studies, mango and banana were found to be the most preferred host plants among the nine cultivated plant species tested.

156 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202351
2022112
202112
202013
201925
201814