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Anacoluthon

About: Anacoluthon is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 35 publications have been published within this topic receiving 120 citations.

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Book ChapterDOI
01 Nov 1993
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors take synchronic linguistics to be the study of those aspects of human communication that are unique to natural language, no matter whether they are principled and inhere specifically in the nature of human language or are arbitrary features of particular languages.
Abstract: Introduction I take synchronic linguistics to be the study of those aspects of human communication that are unique to natural language, no matter whether they are principled and inhere specifically in the nature of human language or are arbitrary features of particular languages. All nonliteral speech, then, including metaphor, falls outside the domain of synchronic linguistics, for nonliteral acts having nothing to do with natural language occur and parallel those that we perform by using language. The study of metaphor, specifically, would not be a proper subject for synchronic linguistics for the reason that the basis of metaphor is a kind of indirection that is shared with nonlanguage behavior. Whatever might be unclear about the way metaphor is used and understood, I take it for granted that the underlying principles governing metaphor are of a general psychological sort and are thus not specifically linguistic. While the intellectual faculties that are involved might be prerequisites to speech, they are independent of it. The fact that a certain group of stars in the night sky reminded someone of a bull and the fact that a lion on a warrior's shield suggests that its bearer is brave are, I think, nonlinguistic instances of the same analogical urge that functions in the issuance and apprehension of metaphor. Other figures of speech, from anacoluthon to zeugma, have counterparts in realms of behavior other than speaking, but here I am interested particularly in the nonliteral figures of speech, of which metaphor is one.

41 citations

Dissertation
01 Nov 2017
TL;DR: In this article, the authors read Bloch's materialist ontology with the aim of producing a utopian perspective on language's materiality, arguing that the present context is marked by a perdurant marginalisation of Blochs form of utopian speculation, serving to couch contemporary materialism in thoroughly unprospective tendencies.
Abstract: My thesis reads Ernst Bloch’s materialist ontology with the aim of producing a utopian perspective on language’s materiality. As my Introduction outlines, set against the backdrop of a contemporary renewal in speculative philosophy, the present context is marked by a twofold limitation: (1) the perdurant marginalisation of Bloch’s form of utopian speculation, serving to couch contemporary materialism in thoroughly un-prospective tendencies; and (2), a relative failure of contemporary speculative philosophy to reflect on language, a failure attributable to the long drawn-out dominance of post-structuralism’s linguistic form of relativism. To overcome these limitations I dedicate Chapter I of my thesis to expounding the core categories of Bloch’s materialism, casting a light on what I call its fundamental compositional structure: Incompleteness → Process → (possibility of an) Outfall, i.e. completion or arrival. In light of this, I argue that, placed within the horizon of Bloch’s materialism, incompleteness, process, and futural-directedness ought to be taken as cornerstones of language’s materiality. So as to better position what this means, in Chapter II a reading of the metaphysical Sens of Bloch’s materialism is given. There I consider Bloch’s materialism as a novel form of analogic metaphysics. Insofar as at the core of Bloch’s materialism there lies a metaphysical conception whereby being as such (e.g. Aristotle’s ontōs on) names an ultimate desire and not—pace the classical metaphysical tradition—an already existent beingness—a metaphysical conception Bloch proleptically terms the “ontology of not-yet being“—so then the essential dynamic of this materialism hinges on an incomplete analogy, for all things relate to that which is not-yet in existence; this not-yetness is the sustaining meaning of what is. In the final chapter I concretise my findings by turning to the question of language proper, reading “anacoluthon” as a speculative materialist figure of language which expressive this utopian analogic metaphysics. Anacoluthon denotes an interruption in syntactical flow (Greek: an-akoluthos, “not following“; German: Satzbruch, “sentence fracture/rupture“) and marginally features in Bloch’s corpus. But precisely because of its marginal status the figure possesses a real force in understanding language’s utopian materiality. Indeed, I read anacoluthia as expressive of the Blochian ontological composition. Anacoluthic discontinuities of speech are read as linguistic expressions of ontological incompleteness, ontological novelty, and ontological directedness to what is not yet. They linguistically express both the non-existence of ontological totality, but also, crucially, a real and open intending towards it: a utopian, creative, linguistically-based transgressiveness expressive of the world’s ontology.

15 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In the introduction to a special issue of diacritics devoted to the work of Avital Ronell, Culler writes that "her books are like no others"; that her sentences "startle, irritate, illuminate"; and that her work consti tutes "one of the most remarkable critical oeuvres of our era".
Abstract: In the introduction to a special issue of diacritics devoted to the work of Avital Ronell, Jonathan Culler writes that "her books are like no others"; that her sentences "startle, irritate, illuminate"; and that her work consti tutes "one of the most remarkable critical oeuvres of our era." RonelPs writing is remarkable, in part, because of the unusual connections it makes, its determination to blur the distinctions between big thought and small talk, philosophy and rumor, literature and headline news?to blur, that is, the very divisions through which academia sustains itself. But Ronell's work is also remarkable in its style: her writing is characteristi cally tough, double entendre intended. It's difficult (because of its enormous scope and depth), and it's also gutsy, rough, edgy, and pushy, with a sort of streetwise candor. Indeed, Ronell herself identifies a kind of "class struggle" going down in her texts, a struggle involving her own various compulsions, denials, and voices?including the "little hood lum," the "high philosophical graduate student," and the "more sophisti cated Parisian." Ronell notes, however, that the most discernible and continuous voice in her texts belongs to the "wise-ass girl," an ancestor of the "buffo" and every bit an anacoluthon out to disrupt the "smooth logic of accepted meaning or signification." This interruptive force? inasmuch as it does indeed "startle, irritate, illuminate"?takes a certain swipe at certitude, prompting rigorous hesitations that open the condi tions of possibility for what Ronell's works are always after: an ethics of decision in a postfoundational whirl(d). RonelPs rigorously deconstructive rereadings of everything?from the telephone, the television, and virtual reality to the Gulf War, AIDS, and Madame Bovary?take up that which has been "marginalized, minoritized, evicted, persecuted, left out of the picture . . .feminized." Operating in the mode of "irreverent reverence" and in the service of a posthumanist ethical imperative, Ronell sets out to "secure the space of academe as a sheltering place of unconditional hospitality for dissidence jac 20.2(2000)

9 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2009-Mln
TL;DR: The authors describe an emotional dynamic that is intrinsic to language rather than simply represented by or expressed in it, which is referred to as linguistic auto-affection, i.e., linguistic affectivity.
Abstract: The goal of this essay is to describe an emotional dynamic that is intrinsic to language rather than simply represented by or expressed in it. Beyond the familiar models of linguistic praxis?positing and performance; reference and signification; formation and deforma? tion?I will attempt to articulate a notion of linguistic affectivity, or more specifically, linguistic auto-affection. The initial focus will be on the traditional but vexing figure of anacoluthon, a breakdown of grammar or syntax that is often mistakenly treated as though its manifestation reveals nothing about language. I will then turn to a reading of Gottfried Benn's "Requiem," a text in which the relations between disruptions of syntactic norms and discursive affectivity are explored in detail. From the Greek for "lack of sequence," anacoluthon is typically defined as an abrupt change in the syntax or grammar of a statement, as when a sentence begins in the first person but suddenly switches to the third person or a transitive verb appears but fails to be followed by a direct object. Anacoluthon is often associated with aposiopesis, in which a sentence breaks off, never to continue, and anapodoton, in which a sentence begins with a subordinate clause that is not fol? lowed by a main clause. In these cases, rhetoricians speak of the initial syntax or grammar creating an expectation for the completion of a pattern that is then thwarted when another grammar rears its head. Anacoluthon is regularly linked with feelings, but not in the terms I propose to delineate. Figures of interruption are celebrated for what they convey about the volatile emotional state of their speaker, since

9 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the author proposes to consider the anacoluthon as a figure of speech, deliberately chosen by the Apostle both to emphasize the total character of the filial relationship of Christians to God, as opposed to their past dependences, and to help them discover this particularity of their new status on their own.
Abstract: This article discusses the Pauline anacoluthon in Romans 8.12. The usual interpretations consider it a communicative accident on the part of Paul or as a case of laudable laconicism. Against such an understanding the present author proposes to consider the anacoluthon as a figure of speech, deliberately chosen by the Apostle both to emphasize the total character of the filial relationship of Christians to God, as opposed to their past dependences, and to help them discover this particularity of their new status on their own.

8 citations

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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20212
20175
20152
20143
20131
20121