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Apprenticeship

About: Apprenticeship is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 6006 publications have been published within this topic receiving 90781 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper proposes the development of a new cognitive apprenticeship to teach students the thinking and problem-solving skills involved in school subjects such as reading, writing and mathematics.
Abstract: : Even today, many complex and important skills, such as those required for language use and social interaction, are learned informally through apprenticeshiplike methods -- i.e., methods involving not didactic teaching, but observation, coaching, and successive approximation while carrying out a variety of tasks and activities. The differences between formal schooling and apprenticeship methods are many, but for our purposes, one is most important. Perhaps as a by-product of the specialization of learning in schools, skills and knowledge taught in schools have become abstracted from their uses in the world. In apprenticeship learning, on the other hand, target skills are not only continually in use by skilled practitioners, but are instrumental to the accomplishment of meaningful tasks. Said differently, apprenticeship embeds the learning of skills and knowledge in the social and functional context of their use. This difference is not academic, but has serious implications for the nature of the knowledge that students acquire. This paper attempts to elucidate some of those implications through a proposal for the retooling of apprenticeship methods for the teaching and learning of cognitive skills. Specifically, we propose the development of a new cognitive apprenticeship to teach students the thinking and problem-solving skills involved in school subjects such as reading, writing and mathematics.

4,586 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 1989
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors propose a new cognitive apprenticeship to teach students the thinking and problem-solving skills involved in school subjects such as reading, writing, and mathematics, where students can observe, enact, and practice them with help from the teacher and from other students.
Abstract: This chapter attempts to elucidate some of those implications through a proposal for adapting apprenticeship methods for the teaching and learning of cognitive skills. The development of a new cognitive apprenticeship to teach students the thinking and problem–solving skills involved in school subjects such as reading, writing, and mathematics. To make real differences in students' skill, need both to understand the nature of expert practice and to devise methods appropriate to learning that practice. An idea of the methods and why they are likely to be effective, the chapter considers some of the crucial features of traditional apprenticeship, as practiced in a West African tailoring shop. Cognitive apprenticeship teaching methods are designs to bring these tacit processes into the open, where students can observe, enact, and practice them with help from the teacher and from other students. In addition to the emphasis on cognitive and metacognitive skills, there are two major differences between cognitive apprenticeship and traditional apprenticeship.

2,977 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a teacher education program follows an apprenticeship model and, in so doing, aspire to provide student teachers with pedagogical skills and techniques derived from a preexisting body of knowledge.
Abstract: Conventional teacher education programs follow an apprenticeship model and, in so doing, aspire to provide student teachers with pedagogical skills and techniques derived from a preexisting body of...

1,245 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors conducted an ethnographic study of summer undergraduate research experiences at four liberal arts colleges, where faculty and students work collaboratively on a project of mutual interest in an apprenticeship of authentic science research work.
Abstract: In this ethnographic study of summer undergraduate research (UR) experiences at four liberal arts colleges, where faculty and students work collaboratively on a project of mutual interest in an apprenticeship of authentic science research work, analysis of the accounts of faculty and student participants yields comparative insights into the structural elements of this form of UR program and its benefits for students. Comparison of the perspectives of faculty and their students revealed considerable agreement on the nature, range, and extent of students' UR gains. Specific student gains relating to the process of “becoming a scientist” were described and illustrated by both groups. Faculty framed these gains as part of professional socialization into the sciences. In contrast, students emphasized their personal and intellectual development, with little awareness of their socialization into professional practice. Viewing study findings through the lens of social constructivist learning theories demonstrates that the characteristics of these UR programs, how faculty practice UR in these colleges, and students' outcomes—including cognitive and personal growth and the development of a professional identity—strongly exemplify many facets of these theories, particularly, student-centered and situated learning as part of cognitive apprenticeship in a community of practice. © 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Sci Ed91:36–74, 2007

1,117 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the context of the economist's concern with education as a process of investment in manpower, it is important to be reminded that formal school instruction is neither an exclusive nor a sufficient method of training the labor force as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: IN TIHE context of the economist's concern with education as a process of investment in manpower, it is important to be reminded that formal school instruction is neither an exclusive nor a sufficient method of training the labor force. Graduation from some level of schooling does not signify the completion of a training process. It is usually the end of a more general and preparatory stage, and the beginning of a more specialized and often prolonged process of acquisition of occupational skill, after entry into the labor force. This second stage, training on the job, ranges from formally organized activities such as apprenticeships and other training programs2 to the in-

1,102 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
2023317
2022665
2021191
2020264
2019292
2018266