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Arabidopsis

About: Arabidopsis is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 30944 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 2181038 citation(s). The topic is also known as: Rockcress.


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Journal ArticleDOI
14 Dec 2000-Nature
TL;DR: This is the first complete genome sequence of a plant and provides the foundations for more comprehensive comparison of conserved processes in all eukaryotes, identifying a wide range of plant-specific gene functions and establishing rapid systematic ways to identify genes for crop improvement.
Abstract: The flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana is an important model system for identifying genes and determining their functions. Here we report the analysis of the genomic sequence of Arabidopsis. The sequenced regions cover 115.4 megabases of the 125-megabase genome and extend into centromeric regions. The evolution of Arabidopsis involved a whole-genome duplication, followed by subsequent gene loss and extensive local gene duplications, giving rise to a dynamic genome enriched by lateral gene transfer from a cyanobacterial-like ancestor of the plastid. The genome contains 25,498 genes encoding proteins from 11,000 families, similar to the functional diversity of Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans--the other sequenced multicellular eukaryotes. Arabidopsis has many families of new proteins but also lacks several common protein families, indicating that the sets of common proteins have undergone differential expansion and contraction in the three multicellular eukaryotes. This is the first complete genome sequence of a plant and provides the foundations for more comprehensive comparison of conserved processes in all eukaryotes, identifying a wide range of plant-specific gene functions and establishing rapid systematic ways to identify genes for crop improvement.

8,350 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Aug 2003-Science
TL;DR: Genome-wide analysis of the distribution of integration events revealed the existence of a large integration site bias at both the chromosome and gene levels, and insertion mutations were identified in genes that are regulated in response to the plant hormone ethylene.
Abstract: Over 225,000 independent Agrobacterium transferred DNA (T-DNA) insertion events in the genome of the reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana have been created that represent near saturation of the gene space. The precise locations were determined for more than 88,000 T-DNA insertions, which resulted in the identification of mutations in more than 21,700 of the approximately 29,454 predicted Arabidopsis genes. Genome-wide analysis of the distribution of integration events revealed the existence of a large integration site bias at both the chromosome and gene levels. Insertion mutations were identified in genes that are regulated in response to the plant hormone ethylene.

4,996 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jun 2000
TL;DR: Evidence for plant stress signaling systems is summarized, some of which have components analogous to those that regulate osmotic stress responses of yeast, some that presumably function in intercellular coordination or regulation of effector genes in a cell-/tissue-specific context required for tolerance of plants.
Abstract: ▪ Abstract Plant responses to salinity stress are reviewed with emphasis on molecular mechanisms of signal transduction and on the physiological consequences of altered gene expression that affect biochemical reactions downstream of stress sensing. We make extensive use of comparisons with model organisms, halophytic plants, and yeast, which provide a paradigm for many responses to salinity exhibited by stress-sensitive plants. Among biochemical responses, we emphasize osmolyte biosynthesis and function, water flux control, and membrane transport of ions for maintenance and re-establishment of homeostasis. The advances in understanding the effectiveness of stress responses, and distinctions between pathology and adaptive advantage, are increasingly based on transgenic plant and mutant analyses, in particular the analysis of Arabidopsis mutants defective in elements of stress signal transduction pathways. We summarize evidence for plant stress signaling systems, some of which have components analogous to t...

4,269 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Gerald A. Tuskan1, Gerald A. Tuskan2, Stephen P. DiFazio2, Stephen P. DiFazio3, Stefan Jansson4, Joerg Bohlmann5, Igor V. Grigoriev6, Uffe Hellsten6, Nicholas H. Putnam6, Steven G. Ralph5, Stephane Rombauts7, Asaf Salamov6, Jacquie Schein, Lieven Sterck7, Andrea Aerts6, Rishikeshi Bhalerao4, Rishikesh P. Bhalerao8, Damien Blaudez9, Wout Boerjan7, Annick Brun9, Amy M. Brunner10, Victor Busov11, Malcolm M. Campbell12, John E. Carlson13, Michel Chalot9, Jarrod Chapman6, G.-L. Chen2, Dawn Cooper5, Pedro M. Coutinho14, Jérémy Couturier9, Sarah F. Covert15, Quentin C. B. Cronk5, R. Cunningham2, John M. Davis16, Sven Degroeve7, Annabelle Déjardin9, Claude W. dePamphilis13, John C. Detter6, Bill Dirks17, Inna Dubchak18, Inna Dubchak6, Sébastien Duplessis9, Jürgen Ehlting5, Brian E. Ellis5, Karla C Gendler19, David Goodstein6, Michael Gribskov20, Jane Grimwood21, Andrew Groover22, Lee E. Gunter2, Björn Hamberger5, Berthold Heinze, Yrjö Helariutta23, Yrjö Helariutta24, Yrjö Helariutta8, Bernard Henrissat14, D. Holligan15, Robert A. Holt, Wenyu Huang6, N. Islam-Faridi22, Steven J.M. Jones, M. Jones-Rhoades25, Richard A. Jorgensen19, Chandrashekhar P. Joshi11, Jaakko Kangasjärvi24, Jan Karlsson4, Colin T. Kelleher5, Robert Kirkpatrick, Matias Kirst16, Annegret Kohler9, Udaya C. Kalluri2, Frank W. Larimer2, Jim Leebens-Mack15, Jean-Charles Leplé9, Philip F. LoCascio2, Y. Lou6, Susan Lucas6, Francis Martin9, Barbara Montanini9, Carolyn A. Napoli19, David R. Nelson26, C D Nelson22, Kaisa Nieminen24, Ove Nilsson8, V. Pereda9, Gary F. Peter16, Ryan N. Philippe5, Gilles Pilate9, Alexander Poliakov18, J. Razumovskaya2, Paul G. Richardson6, Cécile Rinaldi9, Kermit Ritland5, Pierre Rouzé7, D. Ryaboy18, Jeremy Schmutz21, J. Schrader27, Bo Segerman4, H. Shin, Asim Siddiqui, Fredrik Sterky, Astrid Terry6, Chung-Jui Tsai11, Edward C. Uberbacher2, Per Unneberg, Jorma Vahala24, Kerr Wall13, Susan R. Wessler15, Guojun Yang15, T. Yin2, Carl J. Douglas5, Marco A. Marra, Göran Sandberg8, Y. Van de Peer7, Daniel S. Rokhsar6, Daniel S. Rokhsar17 
15 Sep 2006-Science
Abstract: We report the draft genome of the black cottonwood tree, Populus trichocarpa. Integration of shotgun sequence assembly with genetic mapping enabled chromosome-scale reconstruction of the genome. More than 45,000 putative protein-coding genes were identified. Analysis of the assembled genome revealed a whole-genome duplication event; about 8000 pairs of duplicated genes from that event survived in the Populus genome. A second, older duplication event is indistinguishably coincident with the divergence of the Populus and Arabidopsis lineages. Nucleotide substitution, tandem gene duplication, and gross chromosomal rearrangement appear to proceed substantially more slowly in Populus than in Arabidopsis. Populus has more protein-coding genes than Arabidopsis, ranging on average from 1.4 to 1.6 putative Populus homologs for each Arabidopsis gene. However, the relative frequency of protein domains in the two genomes is similar. Overrepresented exceptions in Populus include genes associated with lignocellulosic wall biosynthesis, meristem development, disease resistance, and metabolite transport.

3,740 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The transient gene expression system using Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts has proven an important and versatile tool for conducting cell-based experiments using molecular, cellular, biochemical, genetic, genomic and proteomic approaches to analyze the functions of diverse signaling pathways and cellular machineries.
Abstract: The transient gene expression system using Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts has proven an important and versatile tool for conducting cell-based experiments using molecular, cellular, biochemical, genetic, genomic and proteomic approaches to analyze the functions of diverse signaling pathways and cellular machineries. A well-established protocol that has been extensively tested and applied in numerous experiments is presented here. The method includes protoplast isolation, PEG-calcium transfection of plasmid DNA and protoplast culture. Physiological responses and high-throughput capability enable facile and cost-effective explorations as well as hypothesis-driven tests. The protoplast isolation and DNA transfection procedures take 6-8 h, and the results can be obtained in 2-24 h. The cell system offers reliable guidelines for further comprehensive analysis of complex regulatory mechanisms in whole-plant physiology, immunity, growth and development.

3,107 citations

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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202219
20211,620
20201,680
20191,594
20181,460
20171,522