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Armenian

About: Armenian is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 3167 publications have been published within this topic receiving 25323 citations.


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TL;DR: The attitudinal questionnaire as mentioned in this paper has been used to measure social attitudes of non-Armenian males towards Armenian females in the context of street cars and women in the vicinity of cars.
Abstract: simply, a conditioned response to social stimuli 1 . Terminological usage differs, but students who have concerned themselves with attitudes apparently agree that they are acquired out of social experience and provide the individual organism with some degree of preparation to adjust, in a well-defined way, to certain types of social situations if and when these situations arise. It would seem, therefore, that the totality of the social attitudes of a single individual would include all his socially acquired personality which is involved in the making of adjustments to other human beings. But by derivation social attitudes are seldom more than a verbal response to a symbolic situation. For the conventional method of measuring social attitudes is to ask questions (usually in writing) which demand a verbal adjustment to an entirely symbolic situation. Because it is easy, cheap, and mechanical, the attitudinal questionnaire is rapidly becoming a major method of sociological and socio-psychological investigation. The technique is simple. Thus from a hundred or a thousand responses to the question ‘‘Would you get up to give an Armenian woman your seat in a street car?’’ the investigator derives the ‘‘attitude’’ of non-Armenian males towards Armenian females. Now the question may be constructed with elaborate skill and hidden with consummate cunning in a maze of supplementary or even irrelevant questions yet all that has been obtained is a symbolic response to a symbolic situation. The words ‘‘Armenian woman’’ do not constitute an Armenian woman of flesh and blood, who might be tall or squat, fat or thin, old or young, well or poorly dressed – who might, in fact, be a goddess or just another old and dirty hag. And the questionnaire response, whether it be ‘‘yes’’ or ‘‘no’’, is but a verbal reaction and this does not involve rising from the seat or stolidly avoiding the hurt eyes of the hypothetical woman and the derogatory states of other street-car occupants. Yet, ignoring these limitations, the diligent investigator will jump briskly from his factual evidence to the unwarranted conclusion that he has measured the ‘‘anticipatory behavior patterns’’ of non-Armenian males towards Armenian females encountered on street cars. Usually he does not stop here, but proceeds to deduce certain general conclusions regarding the social relationships between Armenians and non-Armenians. Most of us have applied the questionnaire technique with greater caution, but not I fear with any greater certainty of success. Some years ago I endeavoured to obtain comparative

1,523 citations

Book
01 Jun 1987
TL;DR: This article examined the evidence for the validity of a genetic unit, Amerind, embracing the vast majority of New World languages and concluded that the only languages excluded are those belonging to the Na-Dene and Eskimo Aleut families.
Abstract: This book is concerned primarily with the evidence for the validity of a genetic unit, Amerind, embracing the vast majority of New World languages. The only languages excluded are those belonging to the Na-Dene and Eskimo- Aleut families. It examines the now widely held view that Haida, the most distant language genetically, is not to be included in Na-Dene. It confined itself to Sapir's data, although the evidence could have been buttressed considerably by the use of more recent materials. What survives is a body of evidence superior to that which could be adduced under similar restrictions for the affinity of Albanian, Celtic, and Armenian, all three universally recognized as valid members of the Indo-European family of languages. A considerable number of historical hypotheses emerge from the present and the forthcoming volumes. Of these, the most fundamental bears on the question of the peopling of the Americas. If the results presented in this volume and in the companion volume on Eurasiatic are valid, the classification of the world's languages based on genetic criteria undergoes considerable simplification.

428 citations

Book
01 Jan 1987
TL;DR: The Bilingual Aphasia Test (BAT) as discussed by the authors is a comprehensive language test designed to assess the differential loss or sparing of various language functions in previously bilingual individuals, where the individual is tested, separately, in each language he or she previously used, and then in the two languages simultaneously.
Abstract: The Bilingual Aphasia Test is a comprehensive language test designed to assess the differential loss or sparing of various language functions in previously bilingual individuals. The individual is tested, separately, in each language he or she previously used, and then in the two languages simultaneously. The testing is multimodal -- sampling hearing, speaking, reading, and writing; and multidimensional -- testing various linguistic levels (phonological, morphological, syntactic, lexical, and semantic), tasks (comprehension, repetition, judgment, lexical access and propositionizing), and units (words, sentences, and paragraphs). The BAT is structured as follows: * To test a bilingual aphasic, you will need the following testing elements: the stimulus books for each of the languages in which the individual was formerly fluent, the single-language tests for each of these languages, as well as the bilingual test that links them. For example, if you are testing an English-French bilingual aphasic, you will need an English stimulus book, a French stimulus book, an English single-language test, a French single-language test, and an English-French bilingual test. * The BAT can also be used to test monolingual aphasics. To test for monolingual aphasia, you will need the stimulus book and the single-language test in the language in which the individual was formerly fluent. * Professor Paradis' book, The Assessment of Bilingual Aphasia, provides the background material and serves as the manual for the test. The BAT is available in dozens of languages and language pairs. There are now 106 bilingual pairs available. Additional single-language and bilingual tests are being prepared continuously. If the language (or language pair) you need is not listed, please call LEA to find out if and when it will be available. Single-language materials are now available in: Amharic Arabic (Jordanian) Arabic (Maghrebian) Armenian (Eastern) Armenian (Western) Azari Basque Berber Bulgarian Catalan Chinese (Cantonese) Chinese (Mandarin) Croatian Czech Danish Dutch English Farsi Finnish French Friulian Galician German Greek Hebrew Hindi Hungarian Icelandic Inuktitut Italian Japanese Kannada Korean Kurdish Latvian Lithuanian Luganda Malagasy Norwegian Oryia Polish Portuguese (Brazilian) Portuguese (European) Rumanian Russian Somali Spanish (American) Spanish (European) Swahili Swedish Tagalog Tamil Turkish Ukrainian Urdu Vietnamese Yiddish Bilingual pairs are now available in: Amharic/English Amharic/French Arabic/Armenian Arabic/English Arabic/French Arabic/Somali Arabic/Swahili Armenian/English Armenian/Farsi Armenian/French Armenian/Russian Basque/English Basque/French Basque/Spanish Berber/English Berber/French Bulgarian/English Bulgarian/French Bulgarian/German Bulgarian/Russian Catalan/Spanish Chinese (Cantonese)/English Chinese (Mandarin)/English Chinese/French Croatian/English Croatian/French Croatian/Italian Czech/English Czech/German Czech/Russian Czech/Swedish Danish/English Danish/German Dutch/English Dutch/French Dutch/German Dutch/Hebrew English/Farsi English/Finnish English/French English/Friulian English/German English/Greek English/Hebrew English/Hindi English/Hungarian English/Icelandic English/Italian English/Japanese English/Korean English/Latvian English/Lithuanian English/Luganda English/Norwegian English/Polish English/Portuguese English/Rumanian English/Russian English/Serbian English/Somali English/Spanish English/Swahili English/Swedish English/Tagalog English/Turkish English/Urdu English/Vietnamese Farsi/French Farsi/Hebrew Finnish/French Finnish/Swedish French/Friulian French/German French/Greek French/Hebrew French/Hungarian French/Italian French/Japanese French/Malagasy French/Polish French/Rumanian French/Russian French/Serbian French/Somali French/Spanish French/Swahili French/Urdu French/Vietnamese Friulian/German Friulian/Italian Galician/Spanish German/Greek German/Hebrew German/Hungarian German/Italian German/Polish German/Russian German/Spanish German/Swedish Greek/Spanish Greek/Turkish Italian/Rumanian Italian/Spanish Portuguese/Spanish Russian/Swedish Somali/Swahili

402 citations

Book
01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: Black Garden as discussed by the authors is a study of how Armenia and Azerbaijan, two southern Soviet republics, got sucked into a conflict that helped bring them to independence, bringing to an end the Soviet Union, and plaguing a region of great strategic importance.
Abstract: "Black Garden" is the definitive study of how Armenia and Azerbaijan, two southern Soviet republics, got sucked into a conflict that helped bring them to independence, bringing to an end the Soviet Union, and plaguing a region of great strategic importance. It cuts between a careful reconstruction of the history of Nagorny Karabakh conflict since 1988 and on-the-spot reporting on its convoluted aftermath. Part contemporary history, part travel book, part political analysis, the book is based on six months traveling through the south Caucasus, more than 120 original interviews in the region, Moscow, and Washington, and unique primary sources, such as Politburo archives. The historical chapters trace: how the conflict lay unresolved in the Soviet era; how Armenian and Azerbaijani leaders exacerbated it; how the Politiburo failed to cope with the crisis; how the war began and ended; and, how the international community failed to sort out the conflict. What emerges is a complex and subtle portrait of a beautiful and fascinating region, blighted by historical prejudice and conflict.

264 citations

Book
27 Oct 2004
TL;DR: In this article, the Comparative Method and the Indo-European Family are discussed. But they focus on the Proto-Indo-European Phonology and not on the Indic languages.
Abstract: List of Illustrations. Preface. Aknowledgements. Guide to the Reader. 1. Introduction: The Comparative Method and the Indo-European Family. 2. Proto-Indo-European Culture and Archaeology. 3. Proto-Indo-European Phonology. 4. Proto-Indo-European Morphology: Introduction. 5. The Verb. 6. The Noun. 7. Pronouns and Other Parts of Speech. 8. Proto-Indo-European Syntax. 9. Anatolian. 10. Indo-Iranian I: Indic. 11. Indo-Iranian II: Iranian. 12. Greek. 13. Italic. 14. Celtic. 15. Germanic. 16. Armenian. 17. Tocharian. 18. Balto-Slavic. 19. Albanian. 20. Fragmentary Languages.

251 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20242
2023411
2022852
2021114
2020136
2019129