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Aspergillus niger

About: Aspergillus niger is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 9950 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 198000 citation(s).


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A general, simple and inexpensive method for the isolation of DNA from filamentous fungi, starting from freeze‐dried mycelium 01–015% by weight, which allows the processing of many samples in parallel.
Abstract: We describe a general, simple and inexpensive method for the isolation of DNA from filamentous fungi. Starting from freeze-dried mycelium 01–015% by weight can be isolated as high molecular weight DNA suitable for restriction and ligation in 2 h. The preparation can be done in Eppendorf tubes and allows the processing of many samples in parallel. We have used the method with the basidiomycetes Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Coprinus cinereus and the ascomycete Aspergillus nidulans and others have used it with Trichoderma reesei, Aspergillus niger and for the isolation of DNA from tomato plants.

1,635 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Herman Jan Pel1, Johannes H. de Winde2, Johannes H. de Winde1, David B. Archer3, Paul S. Dyer3, Gerald Hofmann4, Peter J. Schaap5, Geoffrey Turner6, Ronald P. de Vries7, Richard Albang8, Kaj Albermann8, Mikael Rørdam Andersen4, Jannick Dyrløv Bendtsen9, Jacques A.E. Benen5, Marco A. van den Berg1, Stefaan Breestraat1, Mark X. Caddick10, Roland Contreras11, Michael Cornell12, Pedro M. Coutinho13, Etienne Danchin13, Alfons J. M. Debets5, Peter J. T. Dekker1, Piet W.M. van Dijck1, Alard Van Dijk1, Lubbert Dijkhuizen14, Arnold J. M. Driessen14, Christophe d'Enfert15, Steven Geysens11, Coenie Goosen14, Gert S.P. Groot1, Piet W. J. de Groot16, Thomas Guillemette17, Bernard Henrissat13, Marga Herweijer1, Johannes Petrus Theodorus Wilhelmus Van Den Hombergh1, Cees A. M. J. J. van den Hondel18, René T. J. M. van der Heijden19, Rachel M. van der Kaaij14, Frans M. Klis16, Harrie J. Kools5, Christian P. Kubicek, Patricia Ann van Kuyk18, Jürgen Lauber, Xin Lu, Marc J. E. C. van der Maarel, Rogier Meulenberg1, Hildegard Henna Menke1, Martin Mortimer10, Jens Nielsen4, Stephen G. Oliver12, Maurien M.A. Olsthoorn1, K. Pal5, K. Pal20, Noël Nicolaas Maria Elisabeth Van Peij1, Arthur F. J. Ram18, Ursula Rinas, Johannes Andries Roubos1, Cornelis Maria Jacobus Sagt1, Monika Schmoll, Jibin Sun, David W. Ussery4, János Varga20, Wouter Vervecken11, Peter J.J. Van De Vondervoort18, Holger Wedler, Han A. B. Wösten7, An-Ping Zeng, Albert J. J. van Ooyen1, Jaap Visser, Hein Stam1 
TL;DR: The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is widely exploited by the fermentation industry for the production of enzymes and organic acids, particularly citric acid, and the sequenced genome revealed a large number of major facilitator superfamily transporters and fungal zinc binuclear cluster transcription factors.
Abstract: The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is widely exploited by the fermentation industry for the production of enzymes and organic acids, particularly citric acid. We sequenced the 33.9-megabase genome of A. niger CBS 513.88, the ancestor of currently used enzyme production strains. A high level of synteny was observed with other aspergilli sequenced. Strong function predictions were made for 6,506 of the 14,165 open reading frames identified. A detailed description of the components of the protein secretion pathway was made and striking differences in the hydrolytic enzyme spectra of aspergilli were observed. A reconstructed metabolic network comprising 1,069 unique reactions illustrates the versatile metabolism of A. niger. Noteworthy is the large number of major facilitator superfamily transporters and fungal zinc binuclear cluster transcription factors, and the presence of putative gene clusters for fumonisin and ochratoxin A synthesis.

1,096 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is reported that A. tumefaciens can also transfer its T-DNA efficiently to the filamentous fungus Aspergillus awamori, demonstrating DNA transfer between a prokaryote and a filamentous fungi.
Abstract: Agrobacterium tumefaciens transfers part of its Ti plasmid, the T-DNA, to plant cells during tumorigenesis. It is routinely used for the genetic modification of a wide range of plant species. We report that A. tumefaciens can also transfer its T-DNA efficiently to the filamentous fungus Aspergillus awamori, demonstrating DNA transfer between a prokaryote and a filamentous fungus. We transformed both protoplasts and conidia with frequencies that were improved up to 600-fold as compared with conventional techniques for transformation of A. awamori protoplasts. The majority of the A. awamori transformants contained a single T-DNA copy randomly integrated at a chromosomal locus. The T-DNA integrated into the A. awamori genome in a manner similar to that described for plants. We also transformed a variety of other filamentous fungi, including Aspergillus niger, Fusarium venenatum, Trichoderma reesei, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Neurospora crassa, and the mushroom Agaricus bisporus, demonstrating that transformation using A. tumefaciens is generally applicable to filamentous fungi.

853 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is concluded that A. niger is a safe production organism and new and unknown isolates should be checked for ochratoxin A production before they are developed as production organisms.
Abstract: Aspergillus niger is one of the most important microorganisms used in biotechnology. It has been in use already for many decades to produce extracellular (food) enzymes and citric acid. In fact, citric acid and many A. niger enzymes are considered GRAS by the United States Food and Drug Administration. In addition, A. niger is used for biotransformations and waste treatment. In the last two decades, A. niger has been developed as an important transformation host to over-express food enzymes. Being pre-dated by older names, the name A. niger has been conserved for economical and information retrieval reasons and there is a taxonomical consensus based on molecular data that the only other common species closely related to A. niger in the Aspergillus series Nigri is A. tubingensis. A. niger, like other filamentous fungi, should be treated carefully to avoid the formation of spore dust. However, compared with other filamentous fungi, it does not stand out as a particular problem concerning allergy or mycopathology. A few medical cases, e.g. lung infections, have been reported, but always in severely immunocompromised patients. In tropical areas, ear infections (otomycosis) do occur due to A. niger invasion of the outer ear canal but this may be caused by mechanical damage of the skin barrier. A. niger strains produce a series of secondary metabolites, but it is only ochratoxin A that can be regarded as a mycotoxin in the strict sense of the word. Only 3-10% of the strains examined for ochratoxin A production have tested positive under favourable conditions. New and unknown isolates should be checked for ochratoxin A production before they are developed as production organisms. It is concluded, with these restrictions, that A. niger is a safe production organism.

640 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The production of organic acids by these mangrove rhizosphere microorganisms as a possible mechanism involved in the solubilization of insoluble calcium phosphate is proposed.
Abstract: The phosphate-solubilizing potential of the rhizosphere microbial community in mangroves was de- monstrated when culture media supplemented with in- soluble, tribasic calcium phosphate, and incubated with roots of black (Avicennia germinans L.) and white (La- guncularia racemosa (L.) Gaertn.) mangrove became transparent after a few days of incubation. Thirteen phosphate-solubilizing bacterial strains were isolated from the rhizosphere of both species of mangroves: Ba- cillus amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus atrophaeus, Paenibacillus macerans, Vibrio proteolyti- cus, Xanthobacter agilis, Enterobacter aerogenes, Ente- robacter taylorae, Enterobacter asburiae, Kluyvera cryo- crescens, Pseudomonas stutzeri, and Chryseomonas lu- teola. One bacterial isolate could not be identified. The rhizosphere of black mangroves also yielded the fungus Aspergillus niger. The phosphate-solubilizing activity of the isolates was first qualitatively evaluated by the for- mation of halos (clear zones) around the colonies grow- ing on solid medium containing tribasic calcium phos- phate as a sole phosphorus source. Spectrophotometric quantification of phosphate solubilization showed that all bacterial species and A. niger solubilized insoluble phosphate well in a liquid medium, and that V. proteo- lyticus was the most active solubilizing species among the bacteria. Gas chromatographic analyses of cell-free spent culture medium from the various bacteria de- monstrated the presence of 11 identified, and several unidentified, volatile and nonvolatile organic acids. Those most commonly produced by different species were lactic, succinic, isovaleric, isobutyric, and acetic acids. Most of the bacterial species produced more than one organic acid whereas A. niger produced only suc- cinic acid. We propose the production of organic acids by these mangrove rhizosphere microorganisms as a possible mechanism involved in the solubilization of in- soluble calcium phosphate.

560 citations

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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202212
2021277
2020333
2019349
2018358
2017407