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Asset (computer security)

About: Asset (computer security) is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 12282 publications have been published within this topic receiving 197224 citations.


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Book
01 Aug 2001
TL;DR: The Three Essential Activities: Core Asset Development, Software Engineering Practice Areas, and Single-System Development with Reuse - All Three Together.
Abstract: Foreword. Preface. Acknowledgements. Dedication. Reader's Guide. I. SOFTWARE PRODUCT LINE FUNDAMENTALS. 1. Basic Ideas and Terms. What Is a Software Product Line? What Software Product Lines Are Not. Fortuitous Small-Grained Reuse. Single-System Development with Reuse. Just Component-Based Development. Just a Reconfigurable Architecture. Releases and Versions of Single Products. Just a Set of Technical Standards. A Note on Terminology. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. 2. Benefits. Organizational Benefits. Individual Benefits. Benefits versus Costs. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. 3. The Three Essential Activities. What Are the Essential Activities? Core Asset Development. Product Development. Management. All Three Together. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. II. SOFTWARE PRODUCT LINE PRACTICE AREAS. Describing the Practice Areas. Starting versus Running a Product Line. Organizing the Practice Areas. 4. Software Engineering Practice Areas. Architecture Definition. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. Architecture Evaluation. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. Component Development. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. COTS Utilization. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. Mining Existing Assets. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. Discussion Questions. Requirements Engineering. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. Software System Integration. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. Testing. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. Understanding Relevant Domains. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. 5. Technical Management Practice Areas. Configuration Management. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. Data Collection, Metrics, and Tracking. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. Make/Buy/Mine/Commission Analysis. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. Process Definition. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. Scoping. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. Technical Planning. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. Discussion Questions. Technical Risk Management. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. Tool Support. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. 6. Organizational Management Practice Areas. Building a Business Case. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. Customer Interface Management. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. Discussion Questions. Developing an Acquisition Strategy. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. Funding. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. Discussion Questions. Launching and Institutionalizing. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. Discussion Questions. Market Analysis. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. Operations. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. Organizational Planning. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. Discussion Questions. Organizational Risk Management. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. Structuring the Organization. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. Discussion Questions. Technology Forecasting. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. Training. Aspects Peculiar to Product Lines. Application to Core Asset Development. Application to Product Development. Specific Practices. Practice Risks. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. III. PUTTING THE PRACTICE AREAS INTO ACTION. 7. Software Product Line Practice Patterns. The Value of Patterns. Software Product Line Practice Pattern Descriptions. The Curriculum Pattern. The Essentials Coverage Pattern. Each Asset Pattern. What to Build Pattern. Product Parts Pattern. Assembly Line Pattern. Monitor Pattern. Product Builder Pattern. Cold Start Pattern. In Motion Pattern. Process Pattern. Factory Pattern. Other Patterns. Practice Area Coverage. Discussion Questions. 8. Product Line Technical Probe. What Is the Product Line Technical Probe? Probe Interview Questions. Probe Participants. Probe Process. Using the Probe Results. Conducting a Mini Self-Probe. Discussion Questions. 9. Cummins Engine Company: Embracing the Future. Prologue. Company History. A Product Line of Engine Software. Getting off the Ground. An Organization Structured for Cooperation. Running the Product Line. Results. Lessons Learned. Epilogue. Practice Area Compendium. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. 10. Control Channel Toolkit: A Software Product Line that Controls Satellites. Contextual Background. Organizational Profiles. Project History. Control Channels. Launching CCT. Developing a Business Case for CCT. Developing the Acquisition Strategy and Funding CCT. Structuring the CCT Organization. Organizational and Technical Planning. Operations. Engineering the CCT Core Assets. Domain Analysis. Architecture. Component Engineering. Testing: Application and Test Engineering. Sustainment Engineering: Product Line Evolution. Documentation. Managing the CCT Effort. Early Benefits from CCT. First CCT Product. Benefits beyond CCT Products. Lessons and Issues. Tool Support Is Inadequate. Domain Analysis Documentation Is Important. An Early Architecture Focus Is Best. Product Builders Need More Support. CCT Users Need Reuse Metrics. It Pays to Be Flexible, and Cross-Unit Teams Work. A Real Product Is a Benefit. Summary. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. 11. Successful Software product Line Development in Small Organization. Introduction. The Early Years. The MERGER Software Product Line. Market Maker Software Product Line Practices. Architecture Definition. Component Development. Structuring (and Staffing) the Organization. Testing. Data Collection and Metrics. Launching and Institutionalizing the Product Line. Understanding the Market. Technology Forecasting. A Few Observations. Effects of Company Culture. Cost Issues. The Customer Paradox. Tool Support. Lessons Learned. Drawbacks. Conclusions: Software Product Lines in Small Organizations. For Further Reading. Discussion Questions. 12. Conclusions: Practices, Patterns and Payoffs. The Practices. The Patterns. The Success Factors. The Payoff. Finale. Glossary. Bibliography. Index.

3,502 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In a study of thirty-one knowledge management projects in twenty-four companies, the authors examined the differences and similarities of the projects, from which they developed a typology.
Abstract: In a study of thirty-one knowledge management projects in twenty-four companies, the authors examine the differences and similarities of the projects, from which they develop a typology. All the projects had someone responsible for the initiative, a commitment of human and capital resources, and four similar kinds of objectives: (1) they created repositories by storing knowledge and making it easily available to users; (2) they provided access to knowledge and facilitated its transfer; (3) they established an environment that encourages the creation, transfer, and use of knowledge; and (4) they managed knowledge as an asset on the balance sheet. The authors identify eight factors that seem to characterize a successful project: 1. The project involves money saved or earned, such as the Dow Chemical project that better managed company patents. 2. The project uses a broad infrastructure of both technology and organization. A technology infrastructure includes common technologies for desktop computing and communications. An organizational infrastructure establishes roles for people and groups to serve as resources for particular projects. 3. The project has a balanced structure that, while flexible and evolutionary, still makes knowledge easy to access. 4. Within the organization, people are positive about creating, using, and sharing knowledge. 5. The purpose of the project is clear, and the language that knowledge managers use in describing it is framed in terms common to the company's culture. 6. The project motivates people to create, share, and use knowledge (for example, giving awards to the top "knowledge sharers"). 7. There are many ways to transfer knowledge, such as the Internet, Lotus Notes and global communications systems, but also including face-to-face communication. 8. The project has senior managers' support and commitment. An organization's knowledge-oriented culture, senior managers committed to the "knowledge business," a sense of how the customer will use the knowledge, and the human factors involved in creating knowledge are most important to effective knowledge management.

2,857 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A structured view of research on information-flow security is given, particularly focusing on work that uses static program analysis to enforce information- flow policies, and some important open challenges are identified.
Abstract: Current standard security practices do not provide substantial assurance that the end-to-end behavior of a computing system satisfies important security policies such as confidentiality. An end-to-end confidentiality policy might assert that secret input data cannot be inferred by an attacker through the attacker's observations of system output; this policy regulates information flow. Conventional security mechanisms such as access control and encryption do not directly address the enforcement of information-flow policies. Previously, a promising new approach has been developed: the use of programming-language techniques for specifying and enforcing information-flow policies. In this paper, we survey the past three decades of research on information-flow security, particularly focusing on work that uses static program analysis to enforce information-flow policies. We give a structured view of work in the area and identify some important open challenges.

2,058 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Caroline Moser1
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors defined the assets of the urban poor in terms of an "asset vulnerability framework" and showed that the poor are managers of complex asset portfolios, and illustrate how asset management affects household poverty and vulnerability.

1,742 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper proposes introducing a Trusted Third Party, tasked with assuring specific security characteristics within a cloud environment, and presents a horizontal level of service, available to all implicated entities, that realizes a security mesh, within which essential trust is maintained.

1,728 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20242
20231,691
20223,362
2021452
2020681
2019697