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Asynchronous communication

About: Asynchronous communication is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 28159 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 430451 citation(s).
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Proceedings Article
19 Jun 2016-
TL;DR: A conceptually simple and lightweight framework for deep reinforcement learning that uses asynchronous gradient descent for optimization of deep neural network controllers and shows that asynchronous actor-critic succeeds on a wide variety of continuous motor control problems as well as on a new task of navigating random 3D mazes using a visual input.
Abstract: We propose a conceptually simple and lightweight framework for deep reinforcement learning that uses asynchronous gradient descent for optimization of deep neural network controllers. We present asynchronous variants of four standard reinforcement learning algorithms and show that parallel actor-learners have a stabilizing effect on training allowing all four methods to successfully train neural network controllers. The best performing method, an asynchronous variant of actor-critic, surpasses the current state-of-the-art on the Atari domain while training for half the time on a single multi-core CPU instead of a GPU. Furthermore, we show that asynchronous actor-critic succeeds on a wide variety of continuous motor control problems as well as on a new task of navigating random 3D mazes using a visual input.

5,192 citations


Book
01 Jan 1996-
TL;DR: This book familiarizes readers with important problems, algorithms, and impossibility results in the area, and teaches readers how to reason carefully about distributed algorithms-to model them formally, devise precise specifications for their required behavior, prove their correctness, and evaluate their performance with realistic measures.
Abstract: In Distributed Algorithms, Nancy Lynch provides a blueprint for designing, implementing, and analyzing distributed algorithms. She directs her book at a wide audience, including students, programmers, system designers, and researchers. Distributed Algorithms contains the most significant algorithms and impossibility results in the area, all in a simple automata-theoretic setting. The algorithms are proved correct, and their complexity is analyzed according to precisely defined complexity measures. The problems covered include resource allocation, communication, consensus among distributed processes, data consistency, deadlock detection, leader election, global snapshots, and many others. The material is organized according to the system model-first by the timing model and then by the interprocess communication mechanism. The material on system models is isolated in separate chapters for easy reference. The presentation is completely rigorous, yet is intuitive enough for immediate comprehension. This book familiarizes readers with important problems, algorithms, and impossibility results in the area: readers can then recognize the problems when they arise in practice, apply the algorithms to solve them, and use the impossibility results to determine whether problems are unsolvable. The book also provides readers with the basic mathematical tools for designing new algorithms and proving new impossibility results. In addition, it teaches readers how to reason carefully about distributed algorithms-to model them formally, devise precise specifications for their required behavior, prove their correctness, and evaluate their performance with realistic measures. Table of Contents 1 Introduction 2 Modelling I; Synchronous Network Model 3 Leader Election in a Synchronous Ring 4 Algorithms in General Synchronous Networks 5 Distributed Consensus with Link Failures 6 Distributed Consensus with Process Failures 7 More Consensus Problems 8 Modelling II: Asynchronous System Model 9 Modelling III: Asynchronous Shared Memory Model 10 Mutual Exclusion 11 Resource Allocation 12 Consensus 13 Atomic Objects 14 Modelling IV: Asynchronous Network Model 15 Basic Asynchronous Network Algorithms 16 Synchronizers 17 Shared Memory versus Networks 18 Logical Time 19 Global Snapshots and Stable Properties 20 Network Resource Allocation 21 Asynchronous Networks with Process Failures 22 Data Link Protocols 23 Partially Synchronous System Models 24 Mutual Exclusion with Partial Synchrony 25 Consensus with Partial Synchrony

4,335 citations


Proceedings ArticleDOI
Kevin Fall1
25 Aug 2003-
TL;DR: This work proposes a network architecture and application interface structured around optionally-reliable asynchronous message forwarding, with limited expectations of end-to-end connectivity and node resources.
Abstract: The highly successful architecture and protocols of today's Internet may operate poorly in environments characterized by very long delay paths and frequent network partitions. These problems are exacerbated by end nodes with limited power or memory resources. Often deployed in mobile and extreme environments lacking continuous connectivity, many such networks have their own specialized protocols, and do not utilize IP. To achieve interoperability between them, we propose a network architecture and application interface structured around optionally-reliable asynchronous message forwarding, with limited expectations of end-to-end connectivity and node resources. The architecture operates as an overlay above the transport layers of the networks it interconnects, and provides key services such as in-network data storage and retransmission, interoperable naming, authenticated forwarding and a coarse-grained class of service.

3,431 citations


2


Book
16 Jan 2012-
Abstract: This comprehensive treatment of network information theory and its applications provides the first unified coverage of both classical and recent results. With an approach that balances the introduction of new models and new coding techniques, readers are guided through Shannon's point-to-point information theory, single-hop networks, multihop networks, and extensions to distributed computing, secrecy, wireless communication, and networking. Elementary mathematical tools and techniques are used throughout, requiring only basic knowledge of probability, whilst unified proofs of coding theorems are based on a few simple lemmas, making the text accessible to newcomers. Key topics covered include successive cancellation and superposition coding, MIMO wireless communication, network coding, and cooperative relaying. Also covered are feedback and interactive communication, capacity approximations and scaling laws, and asynchronous and random access channels. This book is ideal for use in the classroom, for self-study, and as a reference for researchers and engineers in industry and academia.

2,440 citations


Posted Content
TL;DR: This paper proposes gradient descent algorithms for a class of utility functions which encode optimal coverage and sensing policies which are adaptive, distributed, asynchronous, and verifiably correct.
Abstract: This paper presents control and coordination algorithms for groups of vehicles. The focus is on autonomous vehicle networks performing distributed sensing tasks where each vehicle plays the role of a mobile tunable sensor. The paper proposes gradient descent algorithms for a class of utility functions which encode optimal coverage and sensing policies. The resulting closed-loop behavior is adaptive, distributed, asynchronous, and verifiably correct.

2,196 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202221
2021975
20201,159
20191,305
20181,236
20171,172

Top Attributes

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Topic's top 5 most impactful authors

Alex Yakovlev

107 papers, 1.4K citations

Michel Raynal

96 papers, 2.1K citations

Steven M. Nowick

71 papers, 2.7K citations

Peter A. Beerel

65 papers, 1.2K citations

Rajit Manohar

58 papers, 1.5K citations