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Attentional blink

About: Attentional blink is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 1346 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 53064 citation(s). The topic is also known as: Attentional blinks.
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Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Through rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP), we asked Ss to identify a partially specified letter (target) and then to detect the presence or absence of a fully specified letter (probe). Whereas targets are accurately identified, probes are poorly detected when they are presented during a 270-ms interval beginning 180 ms after the target. Probes presented immediately after the target or later in the RSVP stream are accurately detected. This temporary reduction in probe detection was not found in conditions in which a brief blank interval followed the target or Ss were not required to identify the target. The data suggest that the presentation of stimuli after the target but before target-identification processes are complete produces interference at a letter-recognition stage. This interference may cause the temporary suppression of visual attention mechanisms observed in the present study. Language: en

2,367 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Results of Experiments 3-5 confirmed that AB is triggered by local interference from immediate posttarget stimulation and showed thatAB is modulated by the discriminability between the 1st target and the immediately following distractor.
Abstract: When 2 targets are presented among distractors in rapid serial visual presentation, correct identification of the 1st target results in a deficit for a 2nd target appearing within 200-500 ms. This attentional blink (AB; J. E. Raymond, K. L. Shapiro, & K. M. Arnell, 1992) was examined for categorically defined targets (letters among nonletters) in 7 experiments. AB was obtained for the 2nd letter target among digit distractors (Experiment 1) and also for a 3rd target (Experiment 2). Results of Experiments 3-5 confirmed that AB is triggered by local interference from immediate posttarget stimulation (Raymond et al., 1992) and showed that AB is modulated by the discriminability between the 1st target and the immediately following distractor. Experiments 5-7 further examined the effects of both local interference and global discriminability. A 2-stage model is proposed to account for the AB results. Researchers working on visual attention have focused on. capacity limitations that arise when multiple stimuli must be processed in a single spatial array. Different issues arise when stimuli are presented sequentially. In this study, we examined attentional limitations for processing a temporal sequence of visual stimuli. When participants search for targets among stimuli presented in a sequence at high rates, correct identification of one target produces a marked deficit for detecting a subsequent target appearing in a 200500 ms interval after the onset of the first one (Broadbent & Broadbent, 1987; Raymond, Shapiro, & Arnell, 1992). These tasks involve the use of rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP), in which each item replaces the previous one at the same spatial location. The RSVP paradigm has been a useful tool for researchers exploring the temporal characteristics of information processing because it provides the experimenter with precise control not only over the time a given item is in view, but also over the preceding and subsequent processing demands on the participants. In RSVP each item not only eliminates the previous item from sensory storage (Kahneman, 1968), but also presents a new item to be processed, thus constraining the time available for higher level cognitive as well as perceptual processing (Potter, 1976).

1,351 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Results indicate that the attentional blink reflects an impairment in a postperceptual stage of processing.
Abstract: When an observer detects a target in a rapid stream of visual stimuli, there is a brief period of time during which the detection of subsequent targets is impaired. In this study, event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from normal adult observers to determine whether this "attentional blink" reflects a suppression of perceptual processes or an impairment in postperceptual processes. No suppression was observed during the attentional blink interval for ERP components corresponding to sensory processing (the P1 and N1 components) or semantic analysis (the N400 component). However, complete suppression was observed for an ERP component that has been hypothesized to reflect the updating of working memory (the P3 component). Results indicate that the attentional blink reflects an impairment in a postperceptual stage of processing.

779 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review of the neurobiological literature suggests that the capacity limit of VSTM storage is primarily localized to the posterior parietal and occipital cortex, whereas the AB and PRP are associated with partly overlapping fronto-parietal networks.
Abstract: Despite the impressive complexity and processing power of the human brain, it is severely capacity limited. Behavioral research has highlighted three major bottlenecks of information processing that can cripple our ability to consciously perceive, hold in mind, and act upon the visual world, illustrated by the attentional blink (AB), visual short-term memory (VSTM), and psychological refractory period (PRP) phenomena, respectively. A review of the neurobiological literature suggests that the capacity limit of VSTM storage is primarily localized to the posterior parietal and occipital cortex, whereas the AB and PRP are associated with partly overlapping fronto-parietal networks. The convergence of these two networks in the lateral frontal cortex points to this brain region as a putative neural locus of a common processing bottleneck for perception and action.

766 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is suggested that the transition toward access to consciousness relates to the optional triggering of a late wave of activation that spreads through a distributed network of cortical association areas.
Abstract: In the phenomenon of attentional blink, identical visual stimuli are sometimes fully perceived and sometimes not detected at all. This phenomenon thus provides an optimal situation to study the fate of stimuli not consciously perceived and the differences between conscious and nonconscious processing. We correlated behavioral visibility ratings and recordings of event-related potentials to study the temporal dynamics of access to consciousness. Intact early potentials (P1 and N1) were evoked by unseen words, suggesting that these brain events are not the primary correlates of conscious perception. However, we observed a rapid divergence around 270 ms, after which several brain events were evoked solely by seen words. Thus, we suggest that the transition toward access to consciousness relates to the optional triggering of a late wave of activation that spreads through a distributed network of cortical association areas.

734 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20221
202148
202043
201944
201840
201746