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Automatic Generation Control

About: Automatic Generation Control is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 2896 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 68558 citation(s).

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Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1994-
Abstract: Part I: Characteristics of Modern Power Systems. Introduction to the Power System Stability Problem. Part II: Synchronous Machine Theory and Modelling. Synchronous Machine Parameters. Synchronous Machine Representation in Stability Studies. AC Transmission. Power System Loads. Excitation in Stability Studies. Prime Mover and Energy Supply Systems. High-Voltage Direct-Current Transmission. Control of Active Power and Reactive Power. Part III: Small Signal Stability. Transient Stability. Voltage Stability. Subsynchronous Machine Representation in Stability Studies. AC Transmission. Power System Loads. Excitation in Stability Studies. Prime Mover and Energy Supply Systems, High-Voltage Direct-Current Transmission. Control of Active Power and Reactive Power. Part III: Small Signal Stability. Transient Stability. Voltage Stability. Subsynchronous Oscillations. Mid-Term and Long-Term Stability. Methods of Improving System Stability.

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13,462 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Qing-Chang Zhong1, George Weiss2Institutions (2)
TL;DR: The idea of operating an inverter to mimic a synchronous generator (SG) is motivated and developed, and the inverters that are operated in this way are called synchronverters.

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Abstract: In this paper, the idea of operating an inverter to mimic a synchronous generator (SG) is motivated and developed. We call the inverters that are operated in this way synchronverters. Using synchronverters, the well-established theory/algorithms used to control SGs can still be used in power systems where a significant proportion of the generating capacity is inverter-based. We describe the dynamics, implementation, and operation of synchronverters. The real and reactive power delivered by synchronverters connected in parallel and operated as generators can be automatically shared using the well-known frequency- and voltage-drooping mechanisms. Synchronverters can be easily operated also in island mode, and hence, they provide an ideal solution for microgrids or smart grids. Both simulation and experimental results are given to verify the idea.

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1,576 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Abstract: Summary form only given, as follows. This paper presents a particle swarm optimization (PSO) for reactive power and voltage control (volt/VAr control: VVC) considering voltage security assessment (VSA). VVC can be formulated as a mixed-integer nonlinear optimization problem (MINLP). The proposed method expands the original PSO to handle a MINLP and determines an online VVC strategy with continuous and discrete control variables such as automatic voltage regulator (AVR) operating values of generators, tap positions of on-load tap changer (OLTC) of transformers, and the number of reactive power compensation equipment. The method considers voltage security using a continuation power now and a contingency analysis technique. The feasibility of the proposed method is demonstrated and compared with reactive tabu search (RTS) and the enumeration method on practical power system models with promising results.

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1,281 citations


Book
01 Oct 2008-
Abstract: About The Authors. Preface. Acknowledgements. List of Symbols. PART I: INTRODUCTION TO POWER SYSTEMS. 1 Introduction . 1.1 Stability and Control of a Dynamic System. 1.2 Classification of Power System Dynamics. 1.3 Two Pairs of Important Quantities: Reactive Power/Voltage and Real Power/Frequency. 1.4 Stability of Power System. 1.5 Security of Power System. 1.6 Brief Historical Overview. 2. Power System Components. 2.1 Structure of the Electrical Power System. 2.2 Generating Units. 2.3 Substations. 2.4 Transmission and Distribution Network. 2.5 Protection. 2.6 Wide Area Measurement Systems. 3. The Power System in the Steady-State. 3.1. Transmission Lines. 3.2. Transformers. 3.3. Synchronous Generators. 3.4. Power System Loads. 3.5. Network Equations. 3.6. Power Flows in Transmission Networks. PART II: INTRODUCTION TO POWER SYSTEM DYNAMICS. 4. Electromagnetic Phenomena. 4.1. Fundamentals. 4.2. Three-Phase Short-Circuit on a Synchronous Generator. 4.3. Phase-to-Phase Short-Circuit. 4.4. Synchronization. 4.5. Short Circuit in a Network and its Clearing. 5. Electromechanical Dynamics - Small Disturbances. 5.1. Swing Equation. 5.2. Damping Power. 5.3. Equilibrium Points. 5.4. Steady-State Stability of Unregulated System. 5.5. Steady-State Stability of the Regulated System. 6. Electromechanical Dynamics - Large Disturbances. 6.1. Transient Stability. 6.2. Swings in Multi-Machine Systems. 6.3. Direct Method for Stability Assessment. 6.4. Synchronization. 6.5. Asynchronous Operation and Resynchronization. 6.6 Out-Of-Step Protection Systems. 6.7. Torsional Oscillations in the Drive Shaft. 7. Wind Power. 7.1 Wind Turbines. 7.2 Induction Machine Equivalent Circuit. 7.3 Induction Generator Coupled to the Grid. 7.4 Induction Generators with Slightly Increased Speed Range Via External Rotor Resistance. 7.5 Induction Generators with Significantly Increased Speed Range: DFIGs. 7.6 Fully Rated Converter Systems: Wide Speed Control. 7.7 Peak Power Tracking Of Variable Speed Wind Turbines. 7.8 Connections of Wind Farms. 7.9 Fault Behaviour of Induction Generators. 7.10 Influence of Wind Generators on Power System Stability. 8. Voltage Stability. 8.1. Network Feasibility. 8.2. Stability Criteria. 8.3. Critical Load Demand and Voltage Collapse. 8.4. Static Analysis. 8.5. Dynamic Analysis. 8.6. Prevention of Voltage Collapse. 8.7. Self-Excitation of a Generator Operating on a Capacitive Load. 9. Frequency Stability and Control. 9.1. Automatic Generation Control. 9.2. Stage I - Rotor Swings in the Generators. 9.3. Stage II - Frequency Drop. 9.4. Stage III - Primary Control. 9.5. STAGE IV - Secondary Control. 9.6. FACTS Devices in Tie-Lines. 10. Stability Enhancement. 10.1. Power System Stabilizers. 10.2. Fast Valving. 10.3. Braking Resistors. 10.4. Generator Tripping. 10.5. Shunt FACTS Devices. 10.6. Series Compensators. 10.7. Unified Power Flow Controller . PART III: ADVANCED TOPICS IN POWER SYSTEM DYNAMICS. 11. Advanced Power System Modelling. 11.1 Synchronous Generator. 11.2. Excitation Systems. 11.3. Turbines and Turbine Governors. 11.4. FACTS Devices. 12. Steady-State Stability of Multi-Machine System. 12.1. Mathematical Background. 12.2. Steady-State Stability of Unregulated System. 12.3. Steady-State Stability of The Regulated System. 13. Power System Dynamic Simulation. 13.1. Numerical Integration Methods. 13.2. The Partitioned-Solution. 13.3. The Simultaneous Solution Methods. 13.4. Comparison Between the Methods. 14. Power System Model Reduction - Equivalents. 14.1. Types of Equivalents. 14.2. Network Transformation. 14.3. Aggregation of Generating Units. 14.4. Equivalent Model of External Subsystem. 14.5. Coherency Recognition. 14.6. Properties of Coherency-Based Equivalents. Appendix. References. Index.

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1,158 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Duncan S. Callaway1, Ian A. Hiskens2Institutions (2)
01 Jan 2011-
TL;DR: Conceptual frameworks for actively involving highly distributed loads in power system control actions and some of the challenges to achieving a load control scheme that balances device- level objectives with power system-level objectives are discussed.

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Abstract: This paper discusses conceptual frameworks for actively involving highly distributed loads in power system control actions. The context for load control is established by providing an overview of system control objectives, including economic dispatch, automatic generation control, and spinning reserve. The paper then reviews existing initiatives that seek to develop load control programs for the provision of power system services. We then discuss some of the challenges to achieving a load control scheme that balances device-level objectives with power system-level objectives. One of the central premises of the paper is that, in order to achieve full responsiveness, direct load control (as opposed to price response) is required to enable fast time scale, predictable control opportunities, especially for the provision of ancillary services such as regulation and contingency reserves. Centralized, hierarchical, and distributed control architectures are discussed along with benefits and disadvantages, especially in relation to integration with the legacy power system control architecture. Implications for the supporting communications infrastructure are also considered. Fully responsive load control is illustrated in the context of thermostatically controlled loads and plug-in electric vehicles.

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1,035 citations


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Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20226
2021156
2020227
2019223
2018258
2017209

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Topic's top 5 most impactful authors

Lalit Chandra Saikia

52 papers, 2.3K citations

Binod Kumar Sahu

45 papers, 607 citations

Sidhartha Panda

44 papers, 2.5K citations

Yogendra Arya

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Rabindra Kumar Sahu

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