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BENGAL

About: BENGAL is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 2736 publications have been published within this topic receiving 27910 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The basin-fill history of these geo-tectonic provinces varied considerably as mentioned in this paper due to the location of the basin at the juncture of three interacting plates, viz., the Indian, Burma and Tibetan (Eurasian) Plates.

485 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 1982
TL;DR: In this paper, a study of the northeastern Indian Ocean is presented, covering the areas of the Bengal and Nicobar Fans, the western Wharton Basin, the continental margins surrounding the Bay of Bengal, the Andaman Sea, Andaman-Nicobar Ridge, the Sunda Arc off Sumatra and Java, and the adjacent land areas.
Abstract: This paper is a summary and progress report of a study of the northeastern Indian Ocean, covering the areas of the Bengal and Nicobar Fans, the western Wharton Basin, the continental margins surrounding the Bay of Bengal, the Andaman Sea, the Andaman-Nicobar Ridge, the Sunda Arc off Sumatra and Java, and the adjacent land areas (Fig. 1). Bathymetry and topography of the study area are shown in Fig. 2. Combined, it is one structural province, extending from the Assam Valley on the northeast and the Ganges flood plain on the northwest, southward over oceanic crust to the distal ends of the Bengal and Nicobar Fans. This Mesozoic-Cenozoic structural basin will henceforth be referred to as the Bengal Geosyncline.

454 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A recent reconnaissance of the Bengal provinces of East Pakistan and India indicates that structural activity, primarily faulting, has significantly influenced Quaternary geology as mentioned in this paper. But this reconnaissance was insufficient to permit determination of whether multiple terraces are present within the basin.
Abstract: Reconnaissance of the Bengal provinces of East Pakistan and India indicates that structural activity, primarily faulting, has significantly influenced Quaternary geology. Two areas of Pleistocene terrace border the Bengal basin on the east and west and flank Tertiary and older hills of India. Two large inliers of Pleistocene sediments within the basin are surrounded by Recent flood-plain deposits of the Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers and their combined deltaic plain. Block faulting and echelon faulting have so disturbed the topography of the Pleistocene terrace that the reconnaissance was insufficient to permit determination of whether multiple terraces are present within the basin. Faulting and structural uplift have continued into the Recent epoch, necessitating a physiographic subdivision into an early and a late phase. Changes in the courses of the Ganges and Brahmaputra rivers through Bengal during the last few hundred years can be attributed to faulting and resultant tilting of fault blocks. These changes have caused the Ganges to abandon numerous western distributaries in favor of joining the Brahmaputra-Meghna system to the southeast. At present about 12,000 square miles of former Ganges deltaic plain in southwest Bengal has been abandoned. A series of surface echelon faults plus evidence of structural control of stream courses suggest the presence of a subsiding structural trough or major fault at depth. This active structural zone apparently has controlled both the Brahmaputra and Ganges rivers in their lower reaches. Subsurface information is lacking, but this subsiding trough may possibly be related to the arcuate chain of mountains in adjacent Burma.

412 citations

Book
01 Jan 1993
TL;DR: Eaton as discussed by the authors used archaeological evidence, monuments, narrative histories, poetry, and Mughal administrative documents to trace the long historical encounter between Islamic and Indic civilizations, focusing especially on agrarian growth and religious change.
Abstract: In all of the South Asian subcontinent, Bengal was the region most receptive to the Islamic faith. This area today is home to the world's second-largest Muslim ethnic population. How and why did such a large Muslim population emerge there? And how does such a religious conversion take place? Richard Eaton uses archaeological evidence, monuments, narrative histories, poetry, and Mughal administrative documents to trace the long historical encounter between Islamic and Indic civilizations. Moving from the year 1204, when Persianized Turks from North India annexed the former Hindu states of the lower Ganges delta, to 1760, when the British East India Company rose to political dominance there, Eaton explores these moving frontiers, focusing especially on agrarian growth and religious change.

307 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
2023389
2022890
202192
2020109
2019100
2018116