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Betel

About: Betel is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 1341 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 26709 citation(s). The topic is also known as: betel.

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It was found by univariate analysis that alcohol consumption, smoking, betel quid chewing, educational level and occupation were associated with oral cancer, and there was a statistically significant association between oral cancer and betelQuid chewing alone.

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Abstract: A hospital-based case-control study of matched pairs was conducted to explore (a) the relationship between the use of betel quid chewing, cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking and oral cancer and (b) synergism between these factors. The case group consisted of 104 male and 3 female oral cancer patients and these were compared with 194 male and 6 female matched controls. We found by univariate analysis that alcohol consumption, smoking, betel quid chewing, educational level and occupation were associated with oral cancer. The adjusted odds ratios were to be found elevated in patients who were smoking and betel quid chewing. After adjusting for education and occupation covariates, the incidence of oral cancer was computed to be 123-fold higher in patients who smoked, drank alcohol and chewed betel quid than in abstainers. The synergistic effects of alcohol, tobacco smoke and betel quid in oral cancer were clearly demonstrated, but there was a statistically significant association between oral cancer and betel quid chewing alone. Swallowing betel quid juice (saliva extract of betel quid produced by chewing) or including unripened betel fruit in the quid both seemed to enhance the risks of contracting oral cancer.

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627 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jul 2004-Mutagenesis
TL;DR: Evidence that strongly supports causative mechanisms for genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of these substitute products, including gutkha and pan masala, are strongly implicated in the recent increase in the incidence of oral submucous fibrosis is reviewed.

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Abstract: In south-east Asia, Taiwan and Papua New Guinea, smoking, alcohol consumption and chewing of betel quid with or without tobacco or areca nut with or without tobacco are the predominant causes of oral cancer. In most areas, betel quid consists of a mixture of areca nut, slaked lime, catechu and several condiments according to taste, wrapped in a betel leaf. Almost all habitual chewers use tobacco with or without the betel quid. In the last few decades, small, attractive and inexpensive sachets of betel quid substitutes have become widely available. Aggressively advertised and marketed, often claimed to be safer products, they are consumed by the very young and old alike, particularly in India, but also among migrant populations from these areas world wide. The product is basically a flavoured and sweetened dry mixture of areca nut, catechu and slaked lime with tobacco (gutkha) or without tobacco (pan masala). These products have been strongly implicated in the recent increase in the incidence of oral submucous fibrosis, especially in the very young, even after a short period of use. This precancerous lesion, which has a high rate of malignant transformation, is extremely debilitating and has no known cure. The use of tobacco with lime, betel quid with tobacco, betel quid without tobacco and areca nut have been classified as carcinogenic to humans. As gutkha and pan masala are mixtures of several of these ingredients, their carcinogenic affect can be surmised. We review evidence that strongly supports causative mechanisms for genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of these substitute products. Although some recent curbs have been put on the manufacture and sale of these products, urgent action is needed to permanently ban gutkha and pan masala, together with the other established oral cancer-causing tobacco products. Further, education to reduce or eliminate home-made preparations needs to be accelerated.

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391 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Evidence is presented that strongly supports the concept that TSNA contribute to the increased risk for cancer of the upper digestive tract in tobacco chewers and for the increase risk of lung cancer, especially pulmonary adenocarcinoma, in smokers.

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Abstract: Nicotine and the minor tobacco alkaloids give rise to tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines (TSNA) during tobacco processing and during smoking. Chemical-analytical studies led to the identification of seven TSNA in smokeless tobacco (< or = 25 micrograms/g) and in mainstream smoke of cigarettes (1.3 micrograms TSNA/cigarette). Indoor air polluted by tobacco smoke may contain up to 24 pg/L of TSNA. In mice, rats, and hamsters, three TSNA, N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN), 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL), are powerful carcinogens; two TSNA are moderately active as carcinogens; and two TSNA appear not to be carcinogenic. The TSNA are procarcinogens, agents that require metabolic activation. The active forms of the carcinogenic TSNA react with cellular components, including DNA, and with hemoglobin (Hb). The Hb adducts in chewers and smokers serve as biomarkers for the uptake and metabolic activation of carcinogenic TSNA and the urinary excretion of NNAL as free alcohol and as glucuronide for the uptake of TSNA. The review presents evidence that strongly supports the concept that TSNA contribute to the increased risk for cancer of the upper digestive tract in tobacco chewers and for the increased risk of lung cancer, especially pulmonary adenocarcinoma, in smokers. The high incidence of cancer of the upper digestive tract especially among men on the Indian subcontinent has been causally associated with chewing of betel quid mixed with tobacco. In addition to the TSNA, the betel quid chewers are exposed to four N-nitrosamines that are formed during chewing from the Areca alkaloids, two of these N-nitrosamines are carcinogens. The article also reviews approaches toward the reduction of the carcinogenic potency of smokeless tobacco, betel quid-tobacco mixtures, and cigarette smoke. Although the safest way to reduce the risk for tobacco-related cancers is to refrain from chewing and smoking, modifications of smokeless tobacco and of cigarettes are indicated to lead to less toxic products. Another more recent approach for reducing the carcinogenic effect of tobacco products is the application of chemopreventive agents, primarily of micronutrients. Future aspects in tobacco carcinogenesis, especially as it relates to TSNA, are expected in the field of molecular biochemistry and in biomarker studies, with the goal of identifying those tobacco and betel quid chewers and tobacco smokers who are at especially high risk for cancer.

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351 citations


Journal Article
Prakash C. Gupta1, Cecily S. RayInstitutions (1)
TL;DR: Use of areca nut in any form is not safe for oral health; the use of commercially manufactured forms seems even riskier.

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Abstract: Betel quid chewing is an ancient practice common in many countries of Asia and among migrated communities in Africa, Europe and North America. It enjoys complete social acceptance in many societies and is also popular among women. In its most basic form, betel quid consists of betel leaf (Piper betel), areca nut, the main psychoactive ingredient, and slaked lime (calcium hydroxide). Areca nut is said to be the fourth most commonly used psychoactive substance in the world, after caffeine, nicotine and alcohol. There are a great variety of ingredients and ways of preparing betel quid in different countries. In some, particularly in India, tobacco is added to the quid. In recent years, commercially-manufactured non-perishable forms of betel quid (pan masala or betel quid mixtures and gutka), not containing betel leaf, have been marketed. Within a short period of about 2 decades, this industry has risen in value to several hundred US million dollars. Use of areca nut in any form is not safe for oral health; the use of commercially manufactured forms seems even riskier.

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348 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Sep 2001-Oral Oncology
TL;DR: It would appear that AN toxicity is not completely due to its polyphenol, tannin and alkaloid content, and further studies are needed to delineate the metabolism of AN ingredient and their roles in the multi-step chemical carcinogenesis, to enhance the success of the future chemoprevention of oral cancer and oral submucous fibrosis.

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Abstract: Betel quid (BQ)-chewing is a popular oral habit with potential links to the occurrence of oral cancer. Many of the literature-based studies reveal that areca nut (AN) extract may demonstrate mutagenic and genotoxic effects, in addition to inducing preneoplastic as well as neoplastic lesions in experimental animals. Areca nut should, thus, be highly suspected as a human carcinogen. Toxicity studies relating to AN-contained polyphenols and tannins are not conclusive, with both carcinogenic and anti-carcinogenic effects being reported. The mutagenicity and genotoxicity of areca alkaloids has been detected by many short-term assays. However, their genotoxicity to oral fibroblasts and keratinocytes, the target cells of BQ, has not been identified. It would thus appear that AN toxicity is not completely due to its polyphenol, tannin and alkaloid content. The single agent which is responsible for AN carcinogenicity awaits further clarification. Reactive oxygen species produced during auto-oxidation of AN polyphenols in the BQ-chewer's saliva, are crucial in the initiation and promotion of oral cancer. Nitrosation of areca alkaloids also produces AN-specific nitrosamines, that have been demonstrated to be mutagenic, genotoxic and are capable of inducing tumors in experimental animals. Arecaidine and AN extract are further suggested to be tumor promoters. Antioxidants such as glutathione and N-acetyl-L-cysteine can potentially prevent such AN-elicited cytotoxicity. Further studies are needed to delineate the metabolism of AN ingredient and their roles in the multi-step chemical carcinogenesis, in order to enhance the success of the future chemoprevention of oral cancer and oral submucous fibrosis.

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348 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20221
202146
202087
201970
201875
201765

Top Attributes

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Topic's top 5 most impactful authors

Barbara J. Boucher

10 papers, 640 citations

Yvette C. Paulino

7 papers, 131 citations

Saman Warnakulasuriya

7 papers, 632 citations

Chien-Hung Lee

7 papers, 560 citations

Thaddeus A. Herzog

6 papers, 29 citations