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Bhadralok

About: Bhadralok is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 89 publications have been published within this topic receiving 641 citations.


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Book
12 May 2005
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors analyze why the Indian bhadralok developed a specific rhetoric of culture that has continued to inform their identity to the present day, from the second half of the nineteenth century.
Abstract: This book is about the intellegentsia in nineteenth-century Bengal. It analyzes why--from the second half of the nineteenth century--the Hindu bhadralok in Bengal developed a specific rhetoric of culture that has continued to inform their identity to the present day.

64 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Bhadralok of Calcutta, Theosophists of Madras and the peranakan (local born) Chinese reformers of Singapore shared similar concerns for reform and oversaw parallel campaigns for religious revival, social and educational improvement and constitutional change as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: During the latter part of the nineteenth century and until after the First World War the imperial cities of the Indian Ocean became thriving centres for cultural exchange and intellectual debate. Entrepots like Bombay, Madras, Calcutta, Rangoon and Singapore witnessed the emergence of a non-European, western-educated professional class that serviced the requirements of expanding international commercial interests and the simultaneous growth of the imperial state. Learned elites drawn from the ranks of civil servants, company clerks, doctors, teachers, public inspectors, communications workers, merchants, bankers and (above all) from the legal profession began to form themselves into intelligentsias by immersing themselves in discursive activity, and quickly developed habits of intellectual sociability that became organized and systematic. The Bhadralok of Calcutta, the Theosophists of Madras and the peranakan (local born) Chinese reformers of Singapore, to name but three of these groups, shared similar concerns for reform and oversaw parallel campaigns for religious revival, social and educational improvement and constitutional change. Associational life and journalism flourished in this environment, both in the bureaucratic centres of the British Empire and beyond, in such places as the Dutch port of Batavia and French-administered Saigon, to such an extent that one can fairly speak of a transformation in the public sphere across the Indian Ocean region.

48 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors analyze whether an increasingly globalized television culture has led to a transformation of middle-class Bengali cultural identities, based on ethnographic field-work.
Abstract: This article analyses whether an increasingly globalized television culture has led to a transformation of middle-class Bengali cultural identities. The analysis is based on ethnographic fieldwork ...

47 citations

Book
01 Jan 2004
TL;DR: A Genealogy of Servants: Dominance and Subordination in Households of Early Calcutta - Eighteenth through Twentieth Centuries as discussed by the authors, and Reconstituting the Household: Defining Middle-Class Domesticity in Colonial Bengal -The Mistress and the Servant.
Abstract: INTRODUCTION: THE BHADRALOK, BHADRAMILA, AND DOMESTIC WORKERS IN COLONIAL BENGAL 1. A Genealogy of Servants: Dominance and Subordination in Households of Early Calcutta - Eighteenth through Twentieth Centuries 2. Reconstituting the Household: Defining Middle-Class Domesticity in Colonial Bengal -The Mistress and the Servant 3. Remembering and Writing the Subaltern: Bengali Middle Class Recalls and Represents Domestic Workers 4. Subverting the Moral Universe: Transgression as a Theme in Representing Domestic Workers CONCLUSION

40 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines themes related to cooking, food, nutrition, and the relationship between dietary practice and health in late-nineteenth century and early-twentieth century Bengal, and argues that food and cuisine represented a vibrant site on which a complex rhetorical struggle between colonialism and nationalism was played out.
Abstract: This paper examines themes related to cooking, food, nutrition, and the relationship between dietary practice and health in late-nineteenth century and early-twentieth century Bengal, and argues that food and cuisine represented a vibrant site on which a complex rhetorical struggle between colonialism and nationalism was played out. Insofar as they carried symbolic meanings and ‘civilisational attributes’, cooking and eating transcended their functionality and became cultural practices, with a strong ideological-pedagogical content. The Bengali/Indian kitchen, so strongly reviled in European colonialist discourses as a veritable purgatory, became a critically important symbolic space in the emerging ideology of domesticity during the colonial period. The gastronomic excesses of gluttonous British officials—crucial in asserting the physical superiority of a ‘masculine’ Raj—became an object of ridicule in Bengali culinary texts, signifying the grossness of a materialistic. The cooking and eating of food thus became deeply implicated in the cultural politics of bhadralok nationalism.

32 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20214
20194
20187
20177
20166
201510