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Blue straggler

About: Blue straggler is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 4064 publications have been published within this topic receiving 143052 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A database of parameters for globular star clusters in the Milky Way is described which is available in electronic form through the WorldWideWeb as discussed by the authors. The information in the catalog includes up-to-date measurements for cluster distance, reddening, luminosity, colors and spectral types, velocity, structural and dynamical parameters, horizontal branch morphology, metallicity, and other quantities.
Abstract: A database of parameters for globular star clusters in the Milky Way is described which is available in electronic form through the WorldWideWeb. The information in the catalog includes up-to-date measurements for cluster distance, reddening, luminosity, colors and spectral types, velocity, structural and dynamical parameters, horizontal branch morphology, metallicity, and other quantities. This catalog will be updated regularly and maintained in electronic form for widest possible accessibility. Associated Articles Source Paper Catalog Description Catalog Description

4,741 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a set of models for solar metallicity, where the effects of rotation are accounted for in a homogeneous way, is presented, and a grid of 48 different stellar evolutionary tracks, both rotating and non-rotating, at Z ǫ = 0.014, spanning a wide mass range from 0.8 to 120 m ⊙.
Abstract: Aims. Many topical astrophysical research areas, such as the properties of planet host stars, the nature of the progenitors of different types of supernovae and gamma ray bursts, and the evolution of galaxies, require complete and homogeneous sets of stellar models at different metallicities in order to be studied during the whole of cosmic history. We present here a first set of models for solar metallicity, where the effects of rotation are accounted for in a homogeneous way.Methods. We computed a grid of 48 different stellar evolutionary tracks, both rotating and non-rotating, at Z = 0.014, spanning a wide mass range from 0.8 to 120 M ⊙ . For each of the stellar masses considered, electronic tables provide data for 400 stages along the evolutionary track and at each stage, a set of 43 physical data are given. These grids thus provide an extensive and detailed data basis for comparisons with the observations. The rotating models start on the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) with a rotation rate υ ini /υ crit = 0.4. The evolution is computed until the end of the central carbon-burning phase, the early asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase, or the core helium-flash for, respectively, the massive, intermediate, and both low and very low mass stars. The initial abundances are those deduced by Asplund and collaborators, which best fit the observed abundances of massive stars in the solar neighbourhood. We update both the opacities and nuclear reaction rates, and introduce new prescriptions for the mass-loss rates as stars approach the Eddington and/or the critical velocity. We account for both atomic diffusion and magnetic braking in our low-mass star models.Results. The present rotating models provide a good description of the average evolution of non-interacting stars. In particular, they reproduce the observed main-sequence width, the positions of the red giant and supergiant stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram, the observed surface compositions and rotational velocities. Very interestingly, the enhancement of the mass loss during the red-supergiant stage, when the luminosity becomes supra-Eddington in some outer layers, help models above 15−20 M ⊙ to lose a significant part of their hydrogen envelope and evolve back into the blue part of the HR diagram. This result has interesting consequences for the blue to red supergiant ratio, the minimum mass for stars to become Wolf-Rayet stars, and the maximum initial mass of stars that explode as type II−P supernovae.

1,654 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Abundance variations within globular clusters (GCs) and of GC stars with respect to field stars are important diagnostics of a variety of physical phenomena, related to the evolution of individual stars, mass transfer in binary systems, and chemical evolution in high density environments as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: ▪ Abstract Abundance variations within globular clusters (GCs), and of GC stars with respect to field stars, are important diagnostics of a variety of physical phenomena, related to the evolution of individual stars, mass transfer in binary systems, and chemical evolution in high density environments. The broad astrophysical implications of GCs as building blocks of our knowledge of the Universe make a full understanding of their history and evolution basic in a variety of astrophysical fields. We review the current status of the research in this field, comparing the abundances in GCs with those obtained for field stars, discussing in depth the evidence for H-burning at high temperatures in GC stars, describing the process of self-enrichment in GCs with particular reference to the case of the most massive Galactic GC (ω Cen), and discussing various classes of cluster stars with abundance anomalies. Whereas the overall pattern might appear very complex at first sight, exciting new scenarios are opening whe...

981 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explore the evolution of very rapidly rotating massive stars, including stripped-down helium cores that might result from mergers or mass transfer in a binary, and single stars that rotate unusually rapidly on the main sequence.
Abstract: Those massive stars that give rise to gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) during their deaths must be endowed with an unusually large amount of angular momentum in their inner regions, 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than the ones that make common pulsars. Yet the inclusion of mass loss and angular momentum transport by magnetic torques during the precollapse evolution is known to sap the core of the necessary rotation. Here we explore the evolution of very rapidly rotating massive stars, including stripped-down helium cores that might result from mergers or mass transfer in a binary, and single stars that rotate unusually rapidly on the main sequence. For the highest possible rotation rates (about 400 km s-1), a novel sort of evolution is encountered in which single stars mix completely on the main sequence, never becoming red giants. Such stars, essentially massive "blue stragglers," produce helium-oxygen cores that rotate unusually rapidly. Such stars might comprise roughly 1% of all stars above 10 M☉ and can, under certain circumstances, retain enough angular momentum to make GRBs. Because this possibility is very sensitive to mass loss, GRBs are much more probable in regions of low metallicity.

942 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present abundances of Fe, Na, and O for 1409 red giant stars in 15 galactic globular clusters (GCs), derived from the homogeneous analysis of high-resolution FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectra.
Abstract: We present abundances of Fe, Na, and O for 1409 red giant stars in 15 galactic globular clusters (GCs), derived from the homogeneous analysis of high-resolution FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectra. Combining the present data with results from our FLAMES/UVES spectra and from previous studies within the project, we obtained a total sample of 1958 stars in 19 clusters, the largest and most homogeneous database of this kind to date. The programme clusters cover a range in metallicity from [Fe/H] = −2. 4d ex to [Fe/H] = −0.4 dex, with a wide variety of global parameters (morphology of the horizontal branch, mass, concentration, etc.). For all clusters we find the Na-O anticorrelation, the classical signature of the operation of proton-capture reactions in H-burning at high temperature in a previous generation of more massive stars that are now extinct. Using quantitative criteria (from the morphology and extension of the Na-O anticorrelation), we can define three different components of the stellar population in GCs. We separate a primordial component (P) of first-generation stars, and two components of second-generation stars, that we name intermediate (I) and extreme (E) populations from their different chemical composition. The P component is present in all clusters, and its fraction is almost constant at about one third. The I component represents the bulk of the cluster population. On the other hand, E component is not present in all clusters, and it is more conspicuous in some (but not in all) of the most massive clusters. We discuss the fractions and spatial distributions of these components in our sample and in two additional clusters (M 3 = NGC 5272 and M 13 = NGC6205) with large sets of stars analysed in the literature. We also find that the slope of the anti-correlation (defined by the minimum O and maximum Na abundances) changes from cluster-to-cluster, a change that is represented well by a bilinear relation on cluster metallicity and luminosity. This second dependence suggests a correlation between average mass of polluters and cluster mass.

926 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202333
202251
202129
202048
201969
201857