scispace - formally typeset
Topic

Calibration curve

About: Calibration curve is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 6552 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 95128 citation(s).


Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An improved calibration curve of the pressure shift of the ruby R1 emission line was obtained under quasi-hydrostatic conditions in the diamond-window, high-pressure cell to 800 kbar.
Abstract: An improved calibration curve of the pressure shift of the ruby R1 emission line was obtained under quasi-hydrostatic conditions in the diamond-window, high-pressure cell to 800 kbar. Argon was the pressure-transmitting medium. Metallic copper, as a standard, was studied in situ by X ray diffraction. The reference pressure was determined by calibration against known equations of state of the copper sample and by previously obtained data on silver.

3,226 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the use of an energy dispersive X-ray detector to carry out the analysis of thin foils in the electron microscope is described, where the combination of a thin specimen and the extreme stability of the EDSX detector enables the experimental determination of a calibration curve of Xray production.
Abstract: SUMMARY Results are reported concerning the use of an energy dispersive X-ray detector to carry out the analysis of thin foils in the electron microscope. The combination of a thin specimen and the extreme stability of the energy dispersive X-ray detector enables the experimental determination of a calibration curve of X-ray production—detection efficiency vs characteristic X-ray energy. Quantitative analysis can be carried out using the calibration curve without reference to standards at the time of analysis.

1,665 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a calibration curve for the TDR method is presented which is not restricted to specific soil conditions, based on the dielectric mixing model of Dobson et al. (1985).
Abstract: Time domain reflectometry (TDR) has been developed to an operational level for the measurement of soil water content during the past decade. Because it is able to provide fast, precise and nondestructive in situ measurements, it has become an alternative to the neutron scattering method, in particular for monitoring water content under field conditions. One of the major disadvantages of the neutron scattering technique is that, due to the relatively high sensitivity of the signal to factors other than water content, site-specific calibration is usually required. In this paper a calibration curve for the TDR method is presented which is not restricted to specific soil conditions. The calibration is based on the dielectric mixing model of Dobson et al. (1985). Measurements of volumetric water content and dielectric number at eleven different field sites representing a wide range of soil types were used to determine the parameter of the model by weighted nonlinear regression. The uncertainty (root mean square error) of water content values calculated with the optimized calibration curve was estimated not to exceed 0.013 cm3/cm3. This value is comparable to the precision of the thermogravimetric method. From a sensitivity analysis it was determined that the temperature dependence of the TDR signal may have to be corrected to obtain optimum accuracy.

850 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a nonlinear calibration curve for volume fraction vs integrated intensity ratio was obtained for the monoclinic-tetragonal ZrO2 system by using X-ray powder pattern-fitting and pattern-decomposition techniques.
Abstract: A nonlinear calibration curve for volume fraction vs integrated intensity ratio was obtained for the monoclinic-tetragonal ZrO2 system by using X-ray powder pattern-fitting and pattern-decomposition techniques. The empirical equation agrees well with the theoretical one. By using this equation, the deviation from linearity (6.8% maximum) resulting from the intensity difference of corresponding reflections of the two phases can be estimated quite accurately.

748 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, it is shown that in sufficiently strong favorable and adverse pressure gradients the inner-law velocity distribution breaks down completely, and it is suggested that this breakdown is associated with reversion to laminar flow.
Abstract: Preston's method of measuring skin friction in the turbulent boundary layer makes use of a circular Pitot tube resting on the wall. On the assumption of a velocity distribution in the wall region common to boundary layer and pipe flows the calibration curve for the Pitot tube can be obtained in fully developed pipe flow. Earlier experiments suggested that Preston's original calibration was in error, and a revised calibration curve has been obtained and is presented here.From experiments in strong favourable and adverse pressure gradients, limits are assigned to the pressure-gradient conditions within which the calibration can be used with prescribed accuracy. It is shown that in sufficiently strong favourable gradients the ‘inner-law’ velocity distribution breaks down completely, and it is suggested that this breakdown is associated with reversion to laminar flow.As an incidental result, values have been obtained for the constants occurring in the logarithmic expression for the inner-law velocity distribution.

701 citations


Network Information
Related Topics (5)
High-performance liquid chromatography
47.3K papers, 1M citations
90% related
Mass spectrometry
72.2K papers, 2M citations
88% related
Aqueous solution
189.5K papers, 3.4M citations
78% related
Reagent
60K papers, 1.2M citations
78% related
Particle size
69.8K papers, 1.7M citations
76% related
Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20225
2021134
2020213
2019234
2018216
2017281