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Carbendazim

About: Carbendazim is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 2506 publications have been published within this topic receiving 25109 citations. The topic is also known as: Mecarzole & methyl benzimidazol-2-ylcarbamate.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is found that carbendazim causes embryotoxicity, apoptosis, teratogenicity, infertility, hepatocellular dysfunction, endocrine-disrupting effects, disruption of haematological functions, mitotic spindle abnormalities, mutagenic and aneugenic effect and disrupted the microbial community structure in various ecosystems.
Abstract: The increasing use of toxic pesticides is a major environmental concern. Carbendazim is a systemic fungicide having wide applications for controlling fungal diseases in agriculture, forestry and veterinary medicines. Carbendazim is a major pollutant detectable in food, soil and water. Carbendazim extensive and repeated use induces acute and delayed toxic effects on humans, invertebrates, aquatic life forms and soil microorganisms. Here, we review the pollution, non-target toxicity and microbial degradation of carbendazim for crop and veterinary purposes. We found that carbendazim causes embryotoxicity, apoptosis, teratogenicity, infertility, hepatocellular dysfunction, endocrine-disrupting effects, disruption of haematological functions, mitotic spindle abnormalities, mutagenic and aneugenic effect. We also found that carbendazim disrupted the microbial community structure in various ecosystems. The detection of carbendazim in soil and reservoir sites is performed by spectroscopic, chromatographic, voltammetric, nanoparticles, carbon electrodes and mass spectrometry. A review of the degradation of carbendazim shows that carbendazim undergoes partial to complete biodegradation in the soil and water by Azospirillum, Aeromonas, Alternaria, Bacillus, Brevibacillus, Nocardioides, Pseudomonas, Ralstonia, Rhodococcus, Sphingomonas, Streptomyces and Trichoderma.

217 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The effects of chronic application of the fungicide Derosal(R) (active ingredient carbendazim) were studied in indoor macrophyte-dominated freshwater microcosms and it was hypothesised that carb endazim might have caused the removal of pathogene organisms from the macrophytes.

200 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Among the fungicides tested, those containing tebuconazole tended to be more effective in reducing FHB, and research to develop more resistant cultivars, better spraying technology, and more effective fungicides is also needed.
Abstract: Mesterhazy, A., Bartok, T., and Lamper, C. 2003. Influence of wheat cultivar, species of Fusarium, and isolate aggressiveness on the efficacy of fungicides for control of Fusarium head blight. Plant Dis. 87:1107-1115. Attempts to control Fusarium head blight (FHB) with fungicides have been highly variable. Variability is caused by cultivar resistance, fungicide efficacy, fungicide coverage, timing, and pathogen aggressiveness. In this research, fungicides were tested on winter wheat cultivars with different levels of resistance to FHB using different isolates of Fusarium graminearum and F. culmorum to evaluate the role of host resistance and isolate aggressiveness on severity of FHB. Fungicides were applied to groups of wheat heads to provide full coverage. Incidence and severity of FHB was measured by the severity of head symptoms, percentage of Fusariumdamaged kernels (FDK), yield loss, and deoxynivalenol (DON) contamination. Development of FHB was affected by fungicides, cultivars, fungal isolates, and most of the two-way interactions of these variables. Among the fungicides tested, those containing tebuconazole tended to be more effective in reducing FHB. Reduction of disease in susceptible cultivars may not be adequate to produce marketable yields under conditions of high disease pressure. In most cases, if a fungicide reduced FHB visual symptoms, similar decreases were detected in yield loss, DON concentration, and FDK reaction. In 1998, an increase in DON contamination compared with the Fusarium check was observed with azoxystrobin and carbendazim on the more susceptible cultivar. This increase in DON with some fungicide requires additional research. Research to develop more resistant cultivars, better spraying technology, and more effective fungicides is also needed.

193 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A new phenotype of multiple fungicide resistance was found among fungicide-resistant strains of Botrytis cinerea, which combines the three previously described characteristics of resistance to benzimidazole, dicarboximide and N-phenylcarbamate fungicides.
Abstract: During the period January-March 1989, 15 greenhouses at 12 sites in Israel were surveyed for the presence of fungicide-resistant strains of Botrytis cinerea, using a fungicide-amended Botrytis-selective medium. Resistance to benzimidazoles (BenR) and to dicarboximides (DicR) was frequent in most sites. Resistance to carbendazim + diethofencarb (BenR NPCR) was found in all eight sites in which a mixture of these fungicides had been used against grey mould, but not in other sites. A new phenotype of multiple fungicide resistance was found among these isolates. The new phenotype, designated BenR DicR NPCR, combines the three previously described characteristics of resistance to benzimidazole, dicarboximide and N-phenylcarbamate fungicides. It was found only in cucumber greenhouses that had been sprayed with the fungicide mixture carbendazim + diethofencarb against grey mould. Isolates of this phenotype were pathogenic in artificial inoculation of cucumber cotyledons treated with carbendazim, iprodione or carbendazim + diethofencarb.

186 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The alternation of sprays with the biocontrol preparation and with a dicarboximide fungicide was tested in three out of the five experiments and was found to be effective, thus enabling a reduction in the use of chemical sprays.
Abstract: A preparation of Trichoderma harzianum was sprayed on cucumber plants in greenhouses in order to control fruit and stem grey mould. Up to 90% control was achieved by the biocontrol agent (0·5–1·0 g/l) which in most experiments under commercial conditions was as effective as the dicarboximide fungicides iprodione or vinclozolin (0·5 g/l each) alone or alternated with diethofencarb + carbendazim (0·25 g/l each). However, in one experiment disease incidence in Trichoderma-treated plots did not differ significantly from the control. A mixture of T. harzianum with a dicarboximide fungicide resulted in up to 96% control of grey mould. In this case control was always significant (P=0·05) but improvement of control compared with each treatment alone was not significant (P=0·05). The alternation of sprays with the biocontrol preparation and with a dicarboximide fungicide was tested in three out of the five experiments and was found to be effective, thus enabling a reduction in the use of chemical sprays. Populations of T. harzianum were on a level of 3 × 105-8 × 105 c.f.u. per leaf and ten times lower on one fruit. They remained high after the second and third sprays. Conditions favouring the ability of T. harzianum to control grey mould were temperatures above 20°C and relative humidity between 80 and 97%.

184 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20241
2023101
2022234
202167
202095
2019101