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Chinese wall

About: Chinese wall is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 112 publications have been published within this topic receiving 5041 citations. The topic is also known as: Muraille de Chine.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The model provides a unifying view of all systems that restrict information flow, enables a classification of them according to security objectives, and suggests some new approaches to formulating the requirements of secure information flow among security classes.
Abstract: This paper investigates mechanisms that guarantee secure information flow in a computer system. These mechanisms are examined within a mathematical framework suitable for formulating the requirements of secure information flow among security classes. The central component of the model is a lattice structure derived from the security classes and justified by the semantics of information flow. The lattice properties permit concise formulations of the security requirements of different existing systems and facilitate the construction of mechanisms that enforce security. The model provides a unifying view of all systems that restrict information flow, enables a classification of them according to security objectives, and suggests some new approaches. It also leads to the construction of automatic program certification mechanisms for verifying the secure flow of information through a program.

1,943 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 May 1989
TL;DR: The authors explore a commercial security policy (the Chinese Wall) which represents the behavior required of those persons who perform corporate analysis for financial institutions and concludes that it is perhaps as significant to the financial world as Bell-LaPadula's policies are to the military.
Abstract: The authors explore a commercial security policy (the Chinese Wall) which represents the behavior required of those persons who perform corporate analysis for financial institutions. It can be distinguished from Bell-LaPadula-like policies by the way that a user's permitted accesses are constrained by the history of his previous accesses. It is shown that the formal representation of the policy correctly permits a market analyst to talk to any corporation which does not create a conflict of interest with previous assignments. The Chinese Wall policy combines commercial discretion with legally enforceable mandatory controls. It is required in the operation of many financial services organizations; the authors conclude that it is, therefore, perhaps as significant to the financial world as Bell-LaPadula's policies are to the military. >

1,001 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A balanced perspective on lattice-based access control models is provided and information flow policies, the military lattice,Access control models, the Bell-LaPadula model, the Biba model and duality, and the Chinese Wall lattice are reviewed.
Abstract: Lattice-based access control models were developed in the early 1970s to deal with the confidentiality of military information. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, researchers applied these models to certain integrity concerns. Later, application of the models to the Chinese Wall policy, a confidentiality policy unique to the commercial sector, was demonstrated. A balanced perspective on lattice-based access control models is provided. Information flow policies, the military lattice, access control models, the Bell-LaPadula model, the Biba model and duality, and the Chinese Wall lattice are reviewed. The limitations of the models are identified. >

754 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
09 May 2004
TL;DR: This paper presents a novel information-based approach to address the research problem of characterizing various classes of security policies enforceable by execution monitoring by restricting the execution monitor to track only a shallow history of previously granted access events.
Abstract: Software execution environments like operating systems, mobile code platforms and scriptable applications must protect themselves against potential damages caused by malicious code. Monitoring the execution history of the latter provides an effective means for controlling the access pattern of system services. Several authors have recently proposed increasingly general automata models for characterizing various classes of security policies enforceable by execution monitoring. An open question raised by Bauer, Ligatti and Walker is whether one can further classify the space of security policies by constraining the capabilities of the execution monitor. This paper presents a novel information-based approach to address the research problem. Specifically, security policies are characterized by the information consumed by an enforcing execution monitor. By restricting the execution monitor to track only a shallow history of previously granted access events, a precise characterization of a class of security policies enforceable by restricted access to information is identified. Although provably less expressive than the general class of policies enforceable by execution monitoring, this class does contain naturally occurring policies including Chinese Wall policy, low-water-mark policy, one-out-of-k authorization, assured pipelines, etc. Encouraged by this success, the technique is generalized to produce a lattice of policy classes. Within the lattice, policy classes are ordered by the information required for enforcing member policies. Such a fine-grained policy classification lays the semantic foundation for future studies on special-purpose policy languages.

152 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
04 Dec 1989
TL;DR: A modified Brewer and Nash model without BN-axiom is defined and a new formal model is introduced in which Chinese Walls are built right on the boundary of China-an aggressive model for Chinese Wall security policy.
Abstract: In Brewer and Nash's Chinese Wall security policy model, there is a very strong implicit assumption that the 'conflict of interest' is an equivalence relation It is called the BN-axiom Such axiom is valid only for some very special circumstances By modifying their formulation, a modified Brewer and Nash model without BN-axiom is defined Such model turns out to be rather 'conservative' in the sense that the Chinese Walls are built within Chinese territory; it is not really a Chinese Wall model Next, a new formal model is introduced in which Chinese Walls are built right on the boundary of China-an aggressive model for Chinese Wall security policy >

120 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20211
20165
201510
201411
201311
20122