scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Topic

Class (computer programming)

About: Class (computer programming) is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 22181 publications have been published within this topic receiving 274795 citations. The topic is also known as: cls & Class (computer programming).


Papers
More filters
Book
Bjarne Stroustrup1
01 Jan 1985
TL;DR: Bjarne Stroustrup makes C even more accessible to those new to the language, while adding advanced information and techniques that even expert C programmers will find invaluable.
Abstract: From the Publisher: Written by Bjarne Stroustrup, the creator of C, this is the world's most trusted and widely read book on C. For this special hardcover edition, two new appendixes on locales and standard library exception safety have been added. The result is complete, authoritative coverage of the C language, its standard library, and key design techniques. Based on the ANSI/ISO C standard, The C Programming Language provides current and comprehensive coverage of all C language features and standard library components. For example: abstract classes as interfaces class hierarchies for object-oriented programming templates as the basis for type-safe generic software exceptions for regular error handling namespaces for modularity in large-scale software run-time type identification for loosely coupled systems the C subset of C for C compatibility and system-level work standard containers and algorithms standard strings, I/O streams, and numerics C compatibility, internationalization, and exception safety Bjarne Stroustrup makes C even more accessible to those new to the language, while adding advanced information and techniques that even expert C programmers will find invaluable.

6,795 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a language similar to logo is used to draw geometric pictures using this language and programs are developed to draw geometrical pictures using it, which is similar to the one we use in this paper.
Abstract: The primary purpose of a programming language is to assist the programmer in the practice of her art. Each language is either designed for a class of problems or supports a different style of programming. In other words, a programming language turns the computer into a ‘virtual machine’ whose features and capabilities are unlimited. In this article, we illustrate these aspects through a language similar tologo. Programs are developed to draw geometric pictures using this language.

5,749 citations

Book
01 Dec 1998
TL;DR: This title provides expert knowledge on all facets of today's UML standard, helping developers who are encountering UML on the job for the first time to be more productive.
Abstract: Written by the three pioneers behind the Unified Modeling Language (UML) standard, The Unified Modeling Language Reference Manual provides an excellent real-world guide to working with UML. This title provides expert knowledge on all facets of today's UML standard, helping developers who are encountering UML on the job for the first time to be more productive. The book begins with a history of UML, from structured design methods of the '60s and '70s to the competing object-oriented design standards that were unified in 1997 to create UML. For the novice, the authors illustrate key diagram types such as class, use case, state machine, activity, and implementation. (Of course, learning these basic diagram types is what UML is all about. The authors use an easy-to-understand ticket-booking system for many of their examples.) After a tour of basic document types, The Unified Modeling Language Reference Manual provides an alphabetical listing of more than 350 UML terms. Entries range from a sentence or two to several pages in length. (Class, operation, and use case are just a few of the important terms that are covered.) Though you will certainly need to be acquainted with software engineering principles, this reference will serve the working software developer well. As the authors note, this isn't UML for Dummies, but neither is it an arcane academic treatise. The authors succeed in delivering a readable reference that will answer any UML question, no matter how common or obscure. --Richard Dragan

3,456 citations

Book
01 Jan 1990
TL;DR: This chapter discusses the development of Object-Oriented Programming Languages and the Structure of Complex Systems, and the role of Classification in this development.
Abstract: I. CONCEPTS. 1. Complexity. The Inherent Complexity of Software. The Structure of Complex Systems. Bringing Order to Chaos. On Designing Complex Systems. Sidebar: Categories of Analysis and Design Methods. 2. The Object Model. The Evolution of the Object Model. Elements of the Object Model. Applying the Object Model. Sidebar: Foundations of the Object Model. 3. Classes and Objects. The Nature of an Object. Relationships Among Objects. The Nature of a Class. Relationships Among Classes. The Interplay of Classes and Objects. On Building Quality Classes and Objects. Sidebar: Invoking a Method. 4. Classification. The Importance of Proper Classification. Identifying Classes and Objects. Key Abstractions and Mechanisms. Sidebar: A Problem of Classification. II. THE METHOD. 5 .The Notation. Elements of the Notation. Class Diagrams. State Transition Diagrams. Object Diagrams. Interaction Diagrams. Module Diagrams. Process Diagrams. Applying the Notation. 6 .The Process. First Principles. The Micro Development Process. The Macro Development Process. 7. Pragmatics. Management and Planning. Staffing. Release Management. Reuse. Quality Assurance and Metrics. Documentation. Tools. Special Topics. The Benefits and Risks of Object-Oriented Development. III. APPLICATIONS. 8. Data Acquisition: Weather Monitoring Station. Analysis. Design. Evolution. Maintenance. Sidebar: Weather Monitorint Station Requirements. 9. Frameworks: Foundation Class Library. Analysis. Design. Evolution. Maintenance. Sidebar: Foundation Class Library Requirements. 10. Client/Server Computing: Inventory Tracking. Analysis. Design. Evolution. Maintenance. Sidebar: Inventory Tracking System Requirements. 11. Artificial Intelligence Cryptanalysis. Analysis. Design. Evolution. Maintenance. Sidebar: Cryptanalysis Requirements. 12. Command and Control Traffic Management. Analysis. Design. Evolution. Maintenance. Sidebar: Traffic Management System Requirements. Afterword. Appendix: Object-Oriented Programming Languages. A.1 Concepts. A.2 Smalltalk. A.3 Object Pascal. A.4 C++. A.5 Common Lisp Object System. A.6 Ada. A.7 Eiffel. A.8 Other Object-Oriented Programming Languages. Notes. Glossary. Classified Bibliography. A. Classification. B. Object-Oriented Analysis. C. Object-Oriented Applications. D. Object-Oriented Architectures. E. Object Oriented Databases. F. Object-Oriented Design. G. Object-Oriented Programming. H. Software Engineering. I. Special References. J. Theory. K. Tools and Environments. Index. 0805353402T04062001

3,216 citations


Network Information
Related Topics (5)
Collaborative learning
26K papers, 539.8K citations
72% related
Educational technology
72.4K papers, 1.7M citations
72% related
Distance education
37.7K papers, 522.8K citations
72% related
Active learning
42.3K papers, 1.1M citations
71% related
Learning sciences
20.9K papers, 839.7K citations
71% related
Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20225
2021874
20201,110
20191,121
20181,110
2017977