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Collaborative learning

About: Collaborative learning is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 26099 publications have been published within this topic receiving 539884 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examine the evidence for the effectiveness of active learning and define the common forms of activelearning most relevant for engineering faculty and critically examine the core element of each method, finding broad but uneven support for the core elements of active, collaborative, cooperative and problem-based learning.
Abstract: This study examines the evidence for the effectiveness of active learning. It defines the common forms of active learning most relevant for engineering faculty and critically examines the core element of each method. It is found that there is broad but uneven support for the core elements of active, collaborative, cooperative and problem-based learning.

5,301 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors conduct a meta-analytical study of the existing literature on collaborative governance with the goal of elaborating a contingency model of collaborative governance and identify critical variables that will influence whether or not collaborative governance will produce successful collaboration.
Abstract: Over the past few decades, a new form of governance has emerged to replace adversarial and managerial modes of policy making and implementation. Collaborative governance, as it has come to be known, brings public and private stakeholders together in collective forums with public agencies to engage in consensus-oriented decision making. In this article, we conduct a meta-analytical study of the existing literature on collaborative governance with the goal of elaborating a contingency model of collaborative governance. After reviewing 137 cases of collaborative governance across a range of policy sectors, we identify critical variables that will influence whether or not this mode of governance will produce successful collaboration. These variables include the prior history of conflict or cooperation, the incentives for stakeholders to participate, power and resources imbalances, leadership, and institutional design. We also identify a series of factors that are crucial within the collaborative process itself. These factors include face-to-face dialogue, trust building, and the development of commitment and shared understanding. We found that a virtuous cycle of collaboration tends to develop when collaborative forums focus on ‘‘small wins’’ that deepen trust, commitment, and shared understanding. The article concludes with a discussion of the implications of our contingency model for practitioners and for future research on collaborative governance. Over the last two decades, a new strategy of governing called ‘‘collaborative governance’’ has developed. This mode of governance brings multiple stakeholders together in common forums with public agencies to engage in consensus-oriented decision making. In this article, we conduct a meta-analytical study of the existing literature on collaborative governance with the goal of elaborating a general model of collaborative governance. The ultimate goal is to develop a contingency approach to collaboration that can highlight conditions under which collaborative governance will be more or less effective as an

4,401 citations

01 Jan 2009
TL;DR: Communities of practice are formed by people who engage in a process of collective learning in a shared domain of human endeavor: a tribe learning to survive, a band of artists seeking new forms of expression, a group of engineers working on similar problems, a clique of pupils defining their identity in the school.
Abstract: Communities of practice are formed by people who engage in a process of collective learning in a shared domain of human endeavor: a tribe learning to survive, a band of artists seeking new forms of expression, a group of engineers working on similar problems, a clique of pupils defining their identity in the school, a network of surgeons exploring novel techniques, a gathering of first-time managers helping each other cope. A community of practice is not merely a community of interest--people who like certain kinds of movies, for instance. Members of a community of practice are practitioners. They develop a shared repertoire of resources: experiences, stories, tools, ways of addressing recurring problems in short a shared practice. This takes time and sustained interaction. A good conversation with a stranger on an airplane may give you all sorts of interesting insights, but it does not in itself make for a community of practice. The development of a shared practice may be more or less self-conscious. The "windshield wipers" engineers at an auto manufacturer make a concerted effort to collect and document the tricks and lessons they have learned into a knowledge base. By contrast, nurses who meet regularly for lunch in a hospital cafeteria may not realize that their lunch discussions are one of their main sources of knowledge about how to care for patients. Still, in the course of all these conversations, they have developed a set of stories and cases that have become a shared repertoire for their practice.

2,236 citations

01 Jan 1999
TL;DR: The Learning in Humans and Machines (LHM) workshop series as mentioned in this paper was a series of workshops on collaborative learning that gathered together 20 scholars from the disciplines of psychology, education and computer science.
Abstract: This book arises from a series of workshops on collaborative learning, that gathered together 20 scholars from the disciplines of psychology, education and computer science. The series was part of a research program entitled 'Learning in Humans and Machines' (LHM), launched by Peter Reimann and Hans Spada, and funded by the European Science Foundation. This program aimed to develop a multidisciplinary dialogue on learning, involving mainly scholars from cognitive psychology, educational science, and artificial intelligence (including machine learning). During the preparation of the program, Agnes Blaye, Claire O'Malley, Michael Baker and I developed a theme on collaborative learning. When the program officially began, 12 members were selected to work on this theme and formed the so-called 'task force 5'. I became the coordinator of the group. This group organised two workshops, in Sitges (Spain, 1994) and Aix-en-Provence (France, 1995). In 1996, the group was enriched with new members to reach its final size. Around 20 members met in the subsequent workshops, at Samoens (France, 1996), Houthalen (Belgium, 1996) and Mannheim (Germany, 1997). Several individuals joined the group for some time but have not written a chapter. I would nevertheless like to acknowledge their contributions to our activities: George Bilchev, Stevan Harnad, Calle Jansson and Claire O'Malley.

2,232 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article proposed conditions under which the use of small groups in classrooms can be productive, including task instructions, student preparation, and the nature of the teacher role that are eminently suitable for supporting interaction in more routine learning tasks.
Abstract: Moving beyond the general question of effectiveness of small group learning, this conceptual review proposes conditions under which the use of small groups in classrooms can be productive. Included in the review is recent research that manipulates various features of cooperative learning as well as studies of the relationship of interaction in small groups to outcomes. The analysis develops propositions concerning the kinds of discourse that are productive of different types of learning as well as propositions concerning how desirable kinds of interaction may be fostered. Whereas limited exchange of information and explanation are adequate for routine learning in collaborative seatwork, more open exchange and elaborated discussion are necessary for conceptual learning with group tasks and ill-structured problems. Moreover, task instructions, student preparation, and the nature of the teacher role that are eminently suitable for supporting interaction in more routine learning tasks may result in unduly con...

2,123 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20242
2023227
2022484
20211,077
20201,227
20191,196