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Consumer Advocacy

About: Consumer Advocacy is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 542 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 8667 citation(s).
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: More than twice as many women receiving advocacy services experienced no violence across the 2 years postintervention compared with women who did not receive such services.
Abstract: An intensive community-based advocacy intervention was designed and evaluated by randomly assigning 278 battered women to an experimental or control condition Participants were interviewed 6 times over a period of 2 years Retention rate averaged 95% over the 2 years The 10-week postshelter intervention involved providing trained advocates to work 1-on-1 with women, helping generate and access the community resources they needed to reduce their risk of future violence from their abusive partners Women who worked with advocates experienced less violence over time, reported higher quality of life and social support, and had less difficulty obtaining community resources More than twice as many women receiving advocacy services experienced no violence across the 2 years postintervention compared with women who did not receive such services

554 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors suggest ways to integrate evidence-based practices with the recovery model and then suggest a hybrid theory that maximizes the virtues and minimizes the weaknesses of each model.
Abstract: Consumer advocacy has emerged as an important factor in mental health policy during the past few decades. Winning consumer support for evidence-based practices requires recognition that consumers' desires and needs for various types of treatments and services differ significantly. The authors suggest that the degree of support for evidence-based practices by consumer advocates depends largely on the degree of disability of the persons for whom they are advocating. Advocates such as members of the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill, who focus on the needs of the most seriously disabled consumers, are most likely to be highly supportive of research that is grounded in evidence-based practices. On the other hand, advocates who focus more on the needs of consumers who are further along their road to recovery are more likely to be attracted to the recovery model. Garnering the support of this latter group entails ensuring that consumers, as they recover, are given increasing autonomy and greater input about the types of treatments and services they receive. The authors suggest ways to integrate evidence-based practices with the recovery model and then suggest a hybrid theory that maximizes the virtues and minimizes the weaknesses of each model.

243 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
22 Nov 2006-JAMA
TL;DR: Public roles are definable entities that have widespread support among physicians and Civic-mindedness is associated primarily with sociodemographic factors, but civic action is associated with specialty and practice-based factors.
Abstract: ContextWhether physicians have a professional responsibility to address health-related issues beyond providing care to individual patients has been vigorously debated. Yet little is known about practicing physicians' attitudes about or the extent to which they participate in public roles, which we defined as community participation, political involvement, and collective advocacy.ObjectivesTo determine the importance physicians assign to public roles, their participation in related activities, and sociodemographic and practice factors related to physicians' rated levels of importance and activity.Design, Setting, and ParticipantsMail survey conducted between November 2003 and June 2004 of 1662 US physicians engaged in direct patient care selected from primary care specialties (family practice, internal medicine, pediatrics) and 3 non–primary care specialties (anesthesiology, general surgery, cardiology).Main Outcome MeasuresRated importance of community participation, political involvement, collective advocacy, and relevant self-reported activities encompassing the previous 3 years; rated importance of physician action on different issues.ResultsCommunity participation, political involvement, and collective advocacy were rated as important by more than 90% of respondents, and a majority rated community participation and collective advocacy as very important. Nutrition, immunization, substance abuse, and road safety issues were rated as very important by more physicians than were access-to-care issues, unemployment, or illiteracy. Two thirds of respondents had participated in at least 1 of the 3 types of activities in the previous 3 years. Factors independently related to high overall rating of importance (civic-mindedness) included age, female sex, underrepresented race/ethnicity, and graduation from a non-US or non-Canadian medical school. Civic mindedness, medical specialty, practice type, underrepresented race/ethnicity, preceptors of physicians in training, rural practice, and graduation from a non-US or non-Canadian medical school were independently related to civic activity.ConclusionsPublic roles are definable entities that have widespread support among physicians. Civic-mindedness is associated primarily with sociodemographic factors, but civic action is associated with specialty and practice-based factors.

171 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Dec 1997-Cancer Nursing
TL;DR: The results of a qualitative, descriptive study evaluating the quality of life (QOL) of 21 breast cancer survivors are presented, based on a conceptual model of QOL including physical, psychological, social, and spiritual well-being.
Abstract: Almost 2 million breast cancer survivors reside in the United States. An increase in consumer advocacy and media attention to this disease has helped bring breast cancer survivorship to the forefront of public attention. This has led to increased attention on quality of life(QOL) issues for these su

168 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 2010-Academic Medicine
TL;DR: The authors propose a definition and, using the biographies of actual physician advocates, describe the spectrum of physician advocacy, as first steps toward building a model for competency-based physician advocacy training and delineating physician advocacy in common practice.
Abstract: Many medical authors and organizations have called for physician advocacy as a core component of medical professionalism. Despite widespread acceptance of advocacy as a professional obligation, the concept remains problematic within the profession of medicine because it remains undefined in concept, scope, and practice. If advocacy is to be a professional imperative, then medical schools and graduate education programs must deliberately train physicians as advocates. Accrediting bodies must clearly define advocacy competencies, and all physicians must meet them at some basic level. Sustaining and fostering physician advocacy will require modest changes to both undergraduate and graduate medical education. Developing advocacy training and practice opportunities for practicing physicians will also be necessary. In this article, as first steps toward building a model for competency-based physician advocacy training and delineating physician advocacy in common practice, the authors propose a definition and, using the biographies of actual physician advocates, describe the spectrum of physician advocacy.

166 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20221
20218
202011
201910
201815
201719

Top Attributes

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Topic's top 5 most impactful authors

Simon Chapman

6 papers, 439 citations

Hans Lofgren

3 papers, 27 citations

Evelyne de Leeuw

3 papers, 27 citations

Miriam Proberts

2 papers, 106 citations

Pilar Fernández-Ferrín

2 papers, 37 citations