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Consumer neuroscience

About: Consumer neuroscience is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 1445 publications have been published within this topic receiving 165263 citations. The topic is also known as: CNS.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is proposed that cognitive control stems from the active maintenance of patterns of activity in the prefrontal cortex that represent goals and the means to achieve them, which provide bias signals to other brain structures whose net effect is to guide the flow of activity along neural pathways that establish the proper mappings between inputs, internal states, and outputs needed to perform a given task.
Abstract: ▪ Abstract The prefrontal cortex has long been suspected to play an important role in cognitive control, in the ability to orchestrate thought and action in accordance with internal goals. Its neural basis, however, has remained a mystery. Here, we propose that cognitive control stems from the active maintenance of patterns of activity in the prefrontal cortex that represent goals and the means to achieve them. They provide bias signals to other brain structures whose net effect is to guide the flow of activity along neural pathways that establish the proper mappings between inputs, internal states, and outputs needed to perform a given task. We review neurophysiological, neurobiological, neuroimaging, and computational studies that support this theory and discuss its implications as well as further issues to be addressed

10,943 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
09 Jun 2000-Science
TL;DR: Event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging and a task-switching version of the Stroop task were used to examine whether these components of cognitive control have distinct neural bases in the human brain and a double dissociation was found.
Abstract: Theories of the regulation of cognition suggest a system with two necessary components: one to implement control and another to monitor performance and signal when adjustments in control are needed. Event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging and a task-switching version of the Stroop task were used to examine whether these components of cognitive control have distinct neural bases in the human brain. A double dissociation was found. During task preparation, the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann's area 9) was more active for color naming than for word reading, consistent with a role in the implementation of control. In contrast, the anterior cingulate cortex (Brodmann's areas 24 and 32) was more active when responding to incongruent stimuli, consistent with a role in performance monitoring.

3,545 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The somatic marker hypothesis provides a systems-level neuroanatomical and cognitive framework for decisionMaking and the influence on it by emotion and the relationship between emotion, decision making and other cognitive functions of the frontal lobe, namely working memory is reviewed.
Abstract: The somatic marker hypothesis provides a systems-level neuroanatomical and cognitive framework for decision making and the influence on it by emotion. The key idea of this hypothesis is that decision making is a process that is influenced by marker signals that arise in bioregulatory processes, including those that express themselves in emotions and feelings. This influence can occur at multiple levels of operation, some of which occur consciously and some of which occur non-consciously. Here we review studies that confirm various predictions from the hypothesis. The orbitofrontal cortex represents one critical structure in a neural system subserving decision making. Decision making is not mediated by the orbitofrontal cortex alone, but arises from large-scale systems that include other cortical and subcortical components. Such structures include the amygdala, the somatosensory/insular cortices and the peripheral nervous system. Here we focus only on the role of the orbitofrontal cortex in decision making and emotional processing, and the relationship between emotion, decision making and other cognitive functions of the frontal lobe, namely working memory.

3,250 citations

Book
01 Jan 1980
TL;DR: Anatomy of the prefrontal cortex chemical neurotransmission animal neuropsychological neurophysiology human neuropsychology neuroimaging overview of prefrontal functions - the temporal organization of behaviour.
Abstract: Anatomy of the prefrontal cortex chemical neurotransmission animal neuropsychology neurophysiology human neuropsychology neuroimaging overview of prefrontal functions - the temporal organization of behaviour.

2,498 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The interactions of these regions are characterized by applying graph theory to resting state functional connectivity MRI data, suggesting the presence of two distinct task-control networks that appear to operate on different time scales and affect downstream processing via dissociable mechanisms.
Abstract: Control regions in the brain are thought to provide signals that configure the brain's moment-to-moment information processing. Previously, we identified regions that carried signals related to task-control initiation, maintenance, and adjustment. Here we characterize the interactions of these regions by applying graph theory to resting state functional connectivity MRI data. In contrast to previous, more unitary models of control, this approach suggests the presence of two distinct task-control networks. A frontoparietal network included the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and intraparietal sulcus. This network emphasized start-cue and error-related activity and may initiate and adapt control on a trial-by-trial basis. The second network included dorsal anterior cingulate/medial superior frontal cortex, anterior insula/frontal operculum, and anterior prefrontal cortex. Among other signals, these regions showed activity sustained across the entire task epoch, suggesting that this network may control goal-directed behavior through the stable maintenance of task sets. These two independent networks appear to operate on different time scales and affect downstream processing via dissociable mechanisms.

2,386 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202319
202233
202121
202017
201914
201823