scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Topic

Contemporary art

About: Contemporary art is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 10800 publications have been published within this topic receiving 109230 citations. The topic is also known as: contemporary culture.


Papers
More filters
Book
01 Jan 2009
TL;DR: Ranciere as mentioned in this paper argues for a new politics of seeing, arguing that the masses subjected to the society of spectacle have traditionally been seen as aesthetically and politically passive - in response, both artists and thinkers have sought to transform the spectator into an active agent and the spectacle into a performance.
Abstract: In this title, the foremost philosopher of art argues for a new politics of seeing. The role of the viewer in art and film theory revolves around a theatrical concept of the spectacle. The masses subjected to the society of spectacle have traditionally been seen as aesthetically and politically passive - in response, both artists and thinkers have sought to transform the spectator into an active agent and the spectacle into a performance. In this follow-up to the acclaimed "The Future of the Image", Ranciere takes a radically different approach to this attempted emancipation. Beginning by asking exactly what we mean by political art or the politics of art, he goes on to look at what the tradition of critical art, and the desire to insert art into life, has achieved. Has the militant critique of the consumption of images and commodities become, instead, a melancholic affirmation of their omnipotence?

1,122 citations

Book
01 Jan 1995
TL;DR: A portrait of the author as a not-so-young man can be found in this paper, where the author describes how art works in the conduct of fieldwork and how art in relation to the fieldwork story.
Abstract: chapter 1 Part One: Fieldwork Contexts 1.Introduction: Portrait of the Author as a Not-so-Young Man, About the Title and Contents, About Art, art, Art, The Arts, The Fine Arts chapter 2 2.Fieldwork as Art? A Fieldworker Is (Most) Like A, Artists and Artisans and "All That Is Required" chapter 3 3.How Art Works: Defining Art and Artists, Art vs. Craft as a Public Decision, The "Minor Art" World of Fieldworkers, The Patron Effect, Observing Convention, The Limits of Convention, Artistic License Reconsidered chapter 4 Part Two: The Fieldwork Part of Fieldwork 4. Fieldwork vs. (Just) Being in the Field: Data Gathering as Technique, Who Are Today's Fieldworkers?, Fieldwork as Intimate, Long-Term Acquaintance, How Intimate Is Intimate?, Performance First, Then Script chapter 5 5.Fieldwork: The Basic Arts: Courtesy and Common Sense, Being There, Getting Nosy, Looking Over Other's Shoulders Fieldwork: The Darker Arts: Superficiality, Obviousness, Self-Serving, Lack of Independence, Deception and Betrayal, Clandestine Observation, chapter 6 Part Three: Fieldwork as Mindwork 7. The Art of (Conceptual) Self-Defense: Scientific Method, Objectivity and Bias, neutrality, Reliability, Validity, Generalization, Self-Defense vs. Getting Defensive chapter 7 8. The Art of Conceptualizing: Theory, Mental Set, A Capacity for Judgment chapter 8 9. The Art of Self-Expression: Begin Writing Early, Anticipate How You Will Parcel Out the Study, Work "Start to Finish" but Think "Finish to Start", Writing with Panache, Writing as Central to the Art of Fieldwork, Writing as Disciplined Activity chapter 9 Part Four: Fieldwork As Personal Work 10.The Satisfactions of Fieldwork: Being-or Becoming-a Sociable Social Researcher, A Hint of Adventure, Problem Setting as Intellectual Challenge, The Authority of Authorship, Looking at Life chapter 10 11.The Art of Fieldwork: How Art Works, Art in the Conduct of Fieldwork, Art in Relating the Fieldwork Story chapter 11 References and Select Bibliography chapter 12 Name Index chapter 13 Subject Index chapter 14 About the Author chapter 15 About The Book

1,028 citations

BookDOI
21 Jun 2002
TL;DR: One Place after Another as discussed by the authors provides a critical history of site-specific art since the late 1960s and a theoretical framework for examining the rhetoric of aesthetic vanguardism and political progressivism associated with its many permutations.
Abstract: Site-specific art emerged in the late 1960s in reaction to the growing commodification of art and the prevailing ideals of art's autonomy and universality. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, as site-specific art intersected with land art, process art, performance art, conceptual art, installation art, institutional critique, community-based art, and public art, its creators insisted on the inseparability of the work and its context. In recent years, however, the presumption of unrepeatability and immobility encapsulated in Richard Serra's famous dictum "to remove the work is to destroy the work" has been challenged by new models of site specificity and changes in institutional and market forces. One Place after Another offers a critical history of site-specific art since the late 1960s and a theoretical framework for examining the rhetoric of aesthetic vanguardism and political progressivism associated with its many permutations. It examines site specificity as a complex cipher of the unstable relationship between location and identity in the era of late capitalism. The book addresses the work of, among others, John Ahearn, Mark Dion, Andrea Fraser, Donald Judd, Renee Green, Suzanne Lacy, Inigo Manglano-Ovalle, Richard Serra, Mierle Laderman Ukeles and Fred Wilson.

951 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Oct 2004-October
TL;DR: The Palais de Tokyo as mentioned in this paper is a museum dedicated to the World's Fair of 1937, where the former Japanese pavilion was converted into a site for contemporary creation, and most of the money was used to reinforce (rather than renovate) the existing structure.
Abstract: On the occasion of its opening in 2002, the Palais de Tokyo immediately struck the visitor as different from other contemporary art venues that had recently opened in Europe. Although a budget of 4.75 million euros was spent on converting the former Japanese pavilion for the 1937 World’s Fair into a “site for contemporary creation,” most of this money had been used to reinforce (rather than renovate) the existing structure.1 Instead of clean white walls, discreetly installed lighting, and wooden floors, the interior was left bare and unfinished. This decision was important, as it reflected a key aspect of the venue’s curatorial ethos under its codirectorship by Jerome Sans, an art critic and curator, and Nicolas Bourriaud, former curator at CAPC Bordeaux and editor of the journal Documents sur l’art. The Palais de Tokyo’s improvised relationship to its surroundings has subsequently become paradigmatic of a visible tendency among European art venues to reconceptualize the “white cube” model of displaying contemporary art as a studio or experimental “laboratory.”2 It is therefore in the tradition of what

671 citations

Book
01 Jan 1993
TL;DR: Panofsky's "Meaning in the Visual Arts" has been standard reading for students of art history as discussed by the authors, and it is both an introduction to the study of art and, for those with more specialized interests, a profound discussion about art and life in the Middle Ages and Renaissance.
Abstract: Since its original publication, Erwin Panofsky's "Meaning in the Visual Arts" has been standard reading for students of art history. It is both an introduction to the study of art and, for those with more specialized interests, a profound discussion of art and life in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Panofsky's historical technique reveals an abundance of detail, detail he skillfully relates to the life and work of individual painters and their times. The papers in this volume represent a cross-section of Panofsky's major work. Included are selections from his well-known "Studies in Iconology" and "The Life and Art of Albrecht Durer," plus an introduction and an epilogue-"The History of Art as a Humanistic Discipline" and "Three Decades of Art History in the United States: Impressions of a Transplanted European"-as well as pieces written especially for this collection. All display Panofsky's vast erudition and deep commitment to a humanistic conception of art and art history."

647 citations


Network Information
Related Topics (5)
Narrative
64.2K papers, 1.1M citations
77% related
Colonialism
38.3K papers, 639.3K citations
74% related
Creativity
32K papers, 661.7K citations
74% related
Ideology
54.2K papers, 1.1M citations
74% related
Feminism
27.5K papers, 649.7K citations
74% related
Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20241
202392
2022235
2021236
2020360
2019370