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Core router

About: Core router is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 2763 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 59733 citation(s).
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Journal ArticleDOI
Eddie Kohler1, Robert Morris1, Benjie Chen1, John Jannotti1  +1 moreInstitutions (1)
TL;DR: On conventional PC hardware, the Click IP router achieves a maximum loss-free forwarding rate of 333,000 64-byte packets per second, demonstrating that Click's modular and flexible architecture is compatible with good performance.
Abstract: Clicks is a new software architecture for building flexible and configurable routers. A Click router is assembled from packet processing modules called elements. Individual elements implement simple router functions like packet classification, queuing, scheduling, and interfacing with network devices. A router configurable is a directed graph with elements at the vertices; packets flow along the edges of the graph. Several features make individual elements more powerful and complex configurations easier to write, including pull connections, which model packet flow drivn by transmitting hardware devices, and flow-based router context, which helps an element locate other interesting elements. Click configurations are modular and easy to extend. A standards-compliant Click IP router has 16 elements on its forwarding path; some of its elements are also useful in Ethernet switches and IP tunnelling configurations. Extending the IP router to support dropping policies, fairness among flows, or Differentiated Services simply requires adding a couple of element at the right place. On conventional PC hardware, the Click IP router achieves a maximum loss-free forwarding rate of 333,000 64-byte packets per second, demonstrating that Click's modular and flexible architecture is compatible with good performance.

2,549 citations


Proceedings ArticleDOI
12 Dec 1999
TL;DR: The Click IP router can forward 64-byte packets at 73,000 packets per second, just 10% slower than Linux alone, and is easy to extend by adding additional elements, which are demonstrated with augmented configurations.
Abstract: Click is a new software architecture for building flexible and configurable routers. A Click router is assembled from packet processing modules called elements. Individual elements implement simple router functions like packet classification, queueing, scheduling, and interfacing with network devices. Complete configurations are built by connecting elements into a graph; packets flow along the graph's edges. Several features make individual elements more powerful and complex configurations easier to write, including pull processing, which models packet flow driven by transmitting interfaces, and flow-based router context, which helps an element locate other interesting elements.We demonstrate several working configurations, including an IP router and an Ethernet bridge. These configurations are modular---the IP router has 16 elements on the forwarding path---and easy to extend by adding additional elements, which we demonstrate with augmented configurations. On commodity PC hardware running Linux, the Click IP router can forward 64-byte packets at 73,000 packets per second, just 10% slower than Linux alone.

1,570 citations


Patent
Pauline Shuen1Institutions (1)
20 Mar 1995
Abstract: An internetwork including a plurality of local area networks may include wireless and hard-wired local area networks. The internetwork may also include wide area network links between routers. The system includes routers between networks, which may be bridged networks. Certain routers are configured as home routers. Home routers bind two addresses for each mobile node on a given network when that node logs-in with a home router. Mobile nodes log-in with a home router that assigns a virtual address that does not change throughout a session. Each time, a mobile node roams to another network across a router boundary, the virtual address remains the same and all packets directed to the mobile node are received by the home router which advertises that it can reach the mobile node. As the mobile node roams, it reports back to the home router a local address to which the home router forwards all packets directed originally by correspondent nodes to the virtual address. Mobile nodes may log-in to a router many hops removed from a local area network of the situs. Mobile nodes may also roam across wide area links. The system is transparent to a user.

619 citations


Proceedings ArticleDOI
Mihai Dobrescu1, Norbert Egi2, Katerina Argyraki1, Byung-Gon Chun3  +5 moreInstitutions (3)
11 Oct 2009
TL;DR: This work proposes a software router architecture that parallelizes router functionality both across multiple servers and across multiple cores within a single server, and demonstrates a 35Gbps parallel router prototype.
Abstract: We revisit the problem of scaling software routers, motivated by recent advances in server technology that enable high-speed parallel processing--a feature router workloads appear ideally suited to exploit. We propose a software router architecture that parallelizes router functionality both across multiple servers and across multiple cores within a single server. By carefully exploiting parallelism at every opportunity, we demonstrate a 35Gbps parallel router prototype; this router capacity can be linearly scaled through the use of additional servers. Our prototype router is fully programmable using the familiar Click/Linux environment and is built entirely from off-the-shelf, general-purpose server hardware.

614 citations


Proceedings ArticleDOI
Li-Shiuan Peh1, William J. Dally1Institutions (1)
20 Jan 2001
TL;DR: This paper introduces a router delay model that accurately models key aspects of modern routers and introduces a microarchitecture for a speculative virtual-channel router that significantly reduces its router latency to that of a brown hole router.
Abstract: This paper introduces a router delay model that accurately models key aspects of modern routers. The model accounts for the pipelined nature of contemporary routers, the specific flow control method employed the delay of the flow control credit path, and the sharing of crossbar ports across virtual channels. Motivated by this model, we introduce a microarchitecture for a speculative virtual-channel router that significantly reduces its router latency to that of a brown hole router. Simulations using our pipelined model give results that differ considerably from the commonly assumed 'unit-latency' model which is unreasonably optimistic. Using realistic pipeline models, we compare wormhole and virtual-channel flow control. Our results show that a speculative virtual-channel router has the same per-hop router latency as a wormhole router while improving throughput by up to 40%.

543 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20221
20212
202011
201915
201823
201743