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Corner detection

About: Corner detection is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 2912 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 60946 citation(s).


Papers
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Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1988
TL;DR: The problem the authors are addressing in Alvey Project MMI149 is that of using computer vision to understand the unconstrained 3D world, in which the viewed scenes will in general contain too wide a diversity of objects for topdown recognition techniques to work.
Abstract: The problem we are addressing in Alvey Project MMI149 is that of using computer vision to understand the unconstrained 3D world, in which the viewed scenes will in general contain too wide a diversity of objects for topdown recognition techniques to work. For example, we desire to obtain an understanding of natural scenes, containing roads, buildings, trees, bushes, etc., as typified by the two frames from a sequence illustrated in Figure 1. The solution to this problem that we are pursuing is to use a computer vision system based upon motion analysis of a monocular image sequence from a mobile camera. By extraction and tracking of image features, representations of the 3D analogues of these features can be constructed.

13,266 citations

Journal Article
Abstract: Where feature points are used in real-time frame-rate applications, a high-speed feature detector is necessary. Feature detectors such as SIFT (DoG), Harris and SUSAN are good methods which yield high quality features, however they are too computationally intensive for use in real-time applications of any complexity. Here we show that machine learning can be used to derive a feature detector which can fully process live PAL video using less than 7% of the available processing time. By comparison neither the Harris detector (120%) nor the detection stage of SIFT (300%) can operate at full frame rate. Clearly a high-speed detector is of limited use if the features produced are unsuitable for downstream processing. In particular, the same scene viewed from two different positions should yield features which correspond to the same real-world 3D locations[1]. Hence the second contribution of this paper is a comparison corner detectors based on this criterion applied to 3D scenes. This comparison supports a number of claims made elsewhere concerning existing corner detectors. Further, contrary to our initial expectations, we show that despite being principally constructed for speed, our detector significantly outperforms existing feature detectors according to this criterion. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006.

3,413 citations

Book ChapterDOI
07 May 2006
TL;DR: It is shown that machine learning can be used to derive a feature detector which can fully process live PAL video using less than 7% of the available processing time.
Abstract: Where feature points are used in real-time frame-rate applications, a high-speed feature detector is necessary. Feature detectors such as SIFT (DoG), Harris and SUSAN are good methods which yield high quality features, however they are too computationally intensive for use in real-time applications of any complexity. Here we show that machine learning can be used to derive a feature detector which can fully process live PAL video using less than 7% of the available processing time. By comparison neither the Harris detector (120%) nor the detection stage of SIFT (300%) can operate at full frame rate. Clearly a high-speed detector is of limited use if the features produced are unsuitable for downstream processing. In particular, the same scene viewed from two different positions should yield features which correspond to the same real-world 3D locations [1]. Hence the second contribution of this paper is a comparison corner detectors based on this criterion applied to 3D scenes. This comparison supports a number of claims made elsewhere concerning existing corner detectors. Further, contrary to our initial expectations, we show that despite being principally constructed for speed, our detector significantly outperforms existing feature detectors according to this criterion.

3,320 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is shown how the proposed methodology applies to the problems of blob detection, junction detection, edge detection, ridge detection and local frequency estimation and how it can be used as a major mechanism in algorithms for automatic scale selection, which adapt the local scales of processing to the local image structure.
Abstract: The fact that objects in the world appear in different ways depending on the scale of observation has important implications if one aims at describing them. It shows that the notion of scale is of utmost importance when processing unknown measurement data by automatic methods. In their seminal works, Witkin (1983) and Koenderink (1984) proposed to approach this problem by representing image structures at different scales in a so-called scale-space representation. Traditional scale-space theory building on this work, however, does not address the problem of how to select local appropriate scales for further analysis. This article proposes a systematic methodology for dealing with this problem. A framework is presented for generating hypotheses about interesting scale levels in image data, based on a general principle stating that local extrema over scales of different combinations of γ-normalized derivatives are likely candidates to correspond to interesting structures. Specifically, it is shown how this idea can be used as a major mechanism in algorithms for automatic scale selection, which adapt the local scales of processing to the local image structure. Support for the proposed approach is given in terms of a general theoretical investigation of the behaviour of the scale selection method under rescalings of the input pattern and by integration with different types of early visual modules, including experiments on real-world and synthetic data. Support is also given by a detailed analysis of how different types of feature detectors perform when integrated with a scale selection mechanism and then applied to characteristic model patterns. Specifically, it is described in detail how the proposed methodology applies to the problems of blob detection, junction detection, edge detection, ridge detection and local frequency estimation. In many computer vision applications, the poor performance of the low-level vision modules constitutes a major bottleneck. It is argued that the inclusion of mechanisms for automatic scale selection is essential if we are to construct vision systems to automatically analyse complex unknown environments.

2,834 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A new heuristic for feature detection is presented and, using machine learning, a feature detector is derived from this which can fully process live PAL video using less than 5 percent of the available processing time.
Abstract: The repeatability and efficiency of a corner detector determines how likely it is to be useful in a real-world application. The repeatability is important because the same scene viewed from different positions should yield features which correspond to the same real-world 3D locations. The efficiency is important because this determines whether the detector combined with further processing can operate at frame rate. Three advances are described in this paper. First, we present a new heuristic for feature detection and, using machine learning, we derive a feature detector from this which can fully process live PAL video using less than 5 percent of the available processing time. By comparison, most other detectors cannot even operate at frame rate (Harris detector 115 percent, SIFT 195 percent). Second, we generalize the detector, allowing it to be optimized for repeatability, with little loss of efficiency. Third, we carry out a rigorous comparison of corner detectors based on the above repeatability criterion applied to 3D scenes. We show that, despite being principally constructed for speed, on these stringent tests, our heuristic detector significantly outperforms existing feature detectors. Finally, the comparison demonstrates that using machine learning produces significant improvements in repeatability, yielding a detector that is both very fast and of very high quality.

1,638 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20221
202177
202095
2019143
2018146
2017147