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Crowdsourcing

About: Crowdsourcing is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 12889 publications have been published within this topic receiving 230638 citations.


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Proceedings ArticleDOI
06 Apr 2008
TL;DR: Although micro-task markets have great potential for rapidly collecting user measurements at low costs, it is found that special care is needed in formulating tasks in order to harness the capabilities of the approach.
Abstract: User studies are important for many aspects of the design process and involve techniques ranging from informal surveys to rigorous laboratory studies. However, the costs involved in engaging users often requires practitioners to trade off between sample size, time requirements, and monetary costs. Micro-task markets, such as Amazon's Mechanical Turk, offer a potential paradigm for engaging a large number of users for low time and monetary costs. Here we investigate the utility of a micro-task market for collecting user measurements, and discuss design considerations for developing remote micro user evaluation tasks. Although micro-task markets have great potential for rapidly collecting user measurements at low costs, we found that special care is needed in formulating tasks in order to harness the capabilities of the approach.

2,052 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: An introduction to crowdsourcing is provided, both its theoretical grounding and exemplar cases, taking care to distinguish crowdsourcing from open source production.
Abstract: Crowdsourcing is an online, distributed problem-solving and production model that has emerged in recent years. Notable examples of the model include Threadless, iStockphoto, InnoCentive, the Goldcorp Challenge, and user-generated advertising contests. This article provides an introduction to crowdsourcing, both its theoretical grounding and exemplar cases, taking care to distinguish crowdsourcing from open source production. This article also explores the possibilities for the model, its potential to exploit a crowd of innovators, and its potential for use beyond forprofit sectors. Finally, this article proposes an agenda for research into crowdsourcing.

2,019 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Aug 2013
TL;DR: It is shown how the combined strength and wisdom of the crowds can be used to generate a large, high‐quality, word–emotion and word–polarity association lexicon quickly and inexpensively.
Abstract: Even though considerable attention has been given to the polarity of words (positive and negative) and the creation of large polarity lexicons, research in emotion analysis has had to rely on limited and small emotion lexicons. In this paper, we show how the combined strength and wisdom of the crowds can be used to generate a large, high-quality, word–emotion and word–polarity association lexicon quickly and inexpensively. We enumerate the challenges in emotion annotation in a crowdsourcing scenario and propose solutions to address them. Most notably, in addition to questions about emotions associated with terms, we show how the inclusion of a word choice question can discourage malicious data entry, help to identify instances where the annotator may not be familiar with the target term (allowing us to reject such annotations), and help to obtain annotations at sense level (rather than at word level). We conducted experiments on how to formulate the emotion-annotation questions, and show that asking if a term is associated with an emotion leads to markedly higher interannotator agreement than that obtained by asking if a term evokes an emotion.

1,719 citations

Book
18 Aug 2008
TL;DR: The idea of crowdsourcing was first identified by journalist Jeff Howe in a June 2006 Wired article as mentioned in this paper, which describes the process by which the power of the many can be leveraged to accomplish feats that were once the province of the specialized few.
Abstract: The amount of knowledge and talent dispersed among the human race has always outstripped our capacity to harness it Crowdsourcing corrects thatbut in doing so, it also unleashes the forces of creative destruction From CrowdsourcingFirst identified by journalist Jeff Howe in a June 2006 Wired article, crowdsourcing describes the process by which the power of the many can be leveraged to accomplish feats that were once the province of the specialized few Howe reveals that the crowd is more than wiseits talented, creative, and stunningly productive Crowdsourcing activates the transformative power of todays technology, liberating the latent potential within us all Its a perfect meritocracy, where age, gender, race, education, and job history no longer matter; the quality of work is all that counts; and every field is open to people of every imaginable background If you can perform the service, design the product, or solve the problem, youve got the jobBut crowdsourcing has also triggered a dramatic shift in the way work is organized, talent is employed, research is conducted, and products are made and marketed As the crowd comes to supplant traditional forms of labor, pain and disruption are inevitable Jeff Howe delves into both the positive and negative consequences of this intriguing phenomenon Through extensive reporting from the front lines of this revolution, he employs a brilliant array of stories to look at the economic, cultural, business, and political implications of crowdsourcing How were a bunch of part-time dabblers in finance able to help an investment company consistently beat the market? Why does Procter & Gamble repeatedly call on enthusiastic amateurs to solve scientific and technical challenges? How can companies as diverse as iStockphoto and Threadless employ just a handful of people, yet generate millions of dollars in revenue every year? The answers lie within these pages The blueprint for crowdsourcing originated from a handful of computer programmers who showed that a community of like-minded peers could create better products than a corporate behemoth like Microsoft Jeff Howe tracks the amazing migration of this new model of production, showing the potential of the Internet to create human networks that can divvy up and make quick work of otherwise overwhelming tasks One of the most intriguing ideas of Crowdsourcing is that the knowledge to solve intractable problemsa cure for cancer, for instancemay already exist within the warp and weave of this infinite and, as yet, largely untapped resource But first, Howe proposes, we need to banish preconceived notions of how such problems are solved The very concept of crowdsourcing stands at odds with centuries of practice Yet, for the digital natives soon to enter the workforce, the technologies and principles behind crowdsourcing are perfectly intuitive This generation collaborates, shares, remixes, and creates with a fluency and ease the rest of us can hardly understand Crowdsourcing, just now starting to emerge, will in a short time simply be the way things are done

1,674 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, existing definitions of crowdsourcing are analysed to extract common elements and to establish the basic characteristics of any crowdsourcing initiative.
Abstract: 'Crowdsourcing' is a relatively recent concept that encompasses many practices. This diversity leads to the blurring of the limits of crowdsourcing that may be identified virtually with any type of internet-based collaborative activity, such as co-creation or user innovation. Varying definitions of crowdsourcing exist, and therefore some authors present certain specific examples of crowdsourcing as paradigmatic, while others present the same examples as the opposite. In this article, existing definitions of crowdsourcing are analysed to extract common elements and to establish the basic characteristics of any crowdsourcing initiative. Based on these existing definitions, an exhaustive and consistent definition for crowdsourcing is presented and contrasted in 11 cases.

1,616 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
2023637
20221,420
2021996
20201,250
20191,341
20181,396