scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
Topic

Curcuma

About: Curcuma is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 3066 publications have been published within this topic receiving 60886 citations.


Papers
More filters
Journal Article
TL;DR: Evidence has also been presented to suggest that curcumin can suppress tumor initiation, promotion and metastasis, and Pharmacologically,Curcumin has been found to be safe.
Abstract: Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a polyphenol derived from the plant Curcuma longa, commonly called turmeric. Extensive research over the last 50 years has indicated this polyphenol can both prevent and treat cancer. The anticancer potential of curcumin stems from its ability to suppress proliferation of a wide variety of tumor cells, down-regulate transcription factors NF- κB, AP-1 and Egr-1; down-regulate the expression of COX2, LOX, NOS, MMP-9, uPA, TNF, chemokines, cell surface adhesion molecules and cyclin D1; down-regulate growth factor receptors (such as EGFR and HER2); and inhibit the activity of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, protein tyrosine kinases and protein serine/threonine kinases. In several systems, curcumin has been described as a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. Evidence has also been presented to suggest that curcumin can suppress tumor initiation, promotion and metastasis. Pharmacologically, curcumin has been found to be safe. Human clinical trials indicated no dose-limiting toxicity when administered at doses up to 10 g/day. All of these studies suggest that curcumin has enormous potential in the prevention and therapy of cancer. The current review describes in detail the data supporting these studies. Curcumin, derived from turmeric (vernacular name: Haldi), is a rhizome of the plant Curcuma longa. The medicinal use of this plant has been documented in Ayurveda (the Indian

2,453 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It appears that when given orally, curcumin is far less active than after i.p. administration, and systemic effects seem to be questionable after oral application except that they occur at very low concentrations ofCurcumin, which does not exclude a local action in the gastrointestinal tract.
Abstract: The data reviewed indicate that extracts of Curcuma longa exhibit anti-inflammatory activity after parenteral application in standard animal models used for testing anti-inflammatory activity It turned out that curcumin and the volatile oil are at least in part responsible for this action It appears that when given orally, curcumin is far less active than after ip administration This may be due to poor absorption, as discussed Data on histamine-induced ulcers are controversial, and studies on the secretory activity (HCl, pepsinogen) are still lacking In vitro, curcumin exhibited antispasmodic activity Since there was a protective effect of extracts of Curcuma longa on the liver and a stimulation of bile secretion in animals, Curcuma longa has been advocated for use in liver disorders Evidence for an effect on liver disease in humans is not yet available From the facts that after oral application only traces of curcumin were found in the blood and that, on the other hand, most of the curcumin is excreted via the faeces it may be concluded that curcumin is absorbed poorly by the gastrointestinal tract and/or underlies presystemic transformation Systemic effects therefore seem to be questionable after oral application except that they occur at very low concentrations of curcumin This does not exclude a local action in the gastrointestinal tract

1,714 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This review summarizes the most interesting in vitro and in vivo studies on the biological effects of curcumin, the constituent of turmeric, which has been widely studied for its anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenic,Anti-oxidant, wound healing and anti-cancer effects.

1,526 citations

Book ChapterDOI
TL;DR: Curcumin has been shown to exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and anticancer activities and thus has a potential against various malignant diseases, diabetes, allergies, arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, and other chronic illnesses.
Abstract: Turmeric, derived from the plant Curcuma longa, is a gold-colored spice commonly used in the Indian subcontinent, not only for health care but also for the preservation of food and as a yellow dye for textiles. Curcumin, which gives the yellow color to turmeric, was first isolated almost two centuries ago, and its structure as diferuloylmethane was determined in 1910. Since the time of Ayurveda (1900 Bc) numerous therapeutic activities have been assigned to turmeric for a wide variety of diseases and conditions, including those of the skin, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal systems, aches, pains, wounds, sprains, and liver disorders. Extensive research within the last half century has proven that most of these activities, once associated with turmeric, are due to curcumin. Curcumin has been shown to exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and anticancer activities and thus has a potential against various malignant diseases, diabetes, allergies, arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, and other chronic illnesses. These effects are mediated through the regulation of various transcription factors, growth factors, inflammatory cytokines, protein kinases, and other enzymes. Curcumin exhibits activities similar to recently discovered tumor necrosis factor blockers (e.g., HUMIRA, REMICADE, and ENBREL), a vascular endothelial cell growth factor blocker (e.g., AVASTIN), human epidermal growth factor receptor blockers (e.g., ERBITUX, ERLOTINIB, and GEFTINIB), and a HER2 blocker (e.g., HERCEPTIN). Considering the recent scientific bandwagon that multitargeted therapy is better than monotargeted therapy for most diseases, curcumin can be considered an ideal "Spice for Life".

1,467 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Curcumin III is the most active of the curcuminoids present in turmeric, indicated by the ability of these compounds to suppress the superoxide production by macrophages activated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA).

1,082 citations


Network Information
Related Topics (5)
Antioxidant
37.9K papers, 1.7M citations
86% related
DPPH
30.1K papers, 759.9K citations
85% related
Essential oil
32.6K papers, 625.2K citations
82% related
Malondialdehyde
15.2K papers, 483.9K citations
80% related
Curcumin
9.7K papers, 424.8K citations
78% related
Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20241
2023343
2022841
2021177
2020241
2019189