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Cybercrime

About: Cybercrime is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 3496 publications have been published within this topic receiving 33499 citations. The topic is also known as: computer-oriented crime & cyber warfare.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A general framework for crime data mining is presented that draws on experience gained with the Coplink project, which researchers at the University of Arizona have been conducting in collaboration with the Tucson and Phoenix police departments since 1997.
Abstract: A major challenge facing all law-enforcement and intelligence-gathering organizations is accurately and efficiently analyzing the growing volumes of crime data. Detecting cybercrime can likewise be difficult because busy network traffic and frequent online transactions generate large amounts of data, only a small portion of which relates to illegal activities. Data mining is a powerful tool that enables criminal investigators who may lack extensive training as data analysts to explore large databases quickly and efficiently. We present a general framework for crime data mining that draws on experience gained with the Coplink project, which researchers at the University of Arizona have been conducting in collaboration with the Tucson and Phoenix police departments since 1997.

527 citations

01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present the first systematic study of the costs of cyber-crime in the UK and the world as a whole, focusing on the direct costs, indirect costs and defence costs.
Abstract: This chapter documents what we believe to be the first systematic study of the costs of cybercrime. The initial workshop paper was prepared in response to a request from the UK Ministry of Defence following scepticism that previous studies had hyped the problem. For each of the main categories of cybercrime we set out what is and is not known of the direct costs, indirect costs and defence costs – both to the UK and to the world as a whole. We distinguish carefully between traditional crimes that are now “cyber” because they are conducted online (such as tax and welfare fraud); transitional crimes whose modus operandi has changed substantially as a result of the move online (such as credit card fraud); new crimes that owe their existence to the Internet; and what we might call platform crimes such as the provision of botnets which facilitate other crimes rather than being used to extract money from victims directly. As far as direct costs are concerned, we find that traditional offences such as tax and welfare fraud cost the typical citizen in the low hundreds of pounds/euros/dollars a year; transitional frauds cost a few pounds/euros/dollars; while the new computer crimes cost in the tens of pence/cents. However, the indirect costs and defence costs are much higher for transitional and new crimes. For the former they may be roughly comparable to what the criminals earn, while for the latter they may be an order of magnitude more. As a striking example, the botnet behind a third of the spam sent in 2010 earned its owners around $2.7 million, while worldwide expenditures on spam prevention probably exceeded a billion dollars. We are extremely inefficient at fighting cybercrime; or to put it another way, cyber-crooks are like terrorists or metal thieves in that their activities impose disproportionate costs on society. Some of the reasons for this are well-known: cybercrimes are global and have strong externalities, while traditional crimes such as burglary and car theft are local, and the associated equilibria have emerged after many years of optimisation. As for the more direct question of what should be done, our figures suggest that we should spend less in anticipation of cybercrime (on antivirus, firewalls, etc.) and more in response – that is, on the prosaic business of hunting down cyber-criminals and throwing them in jail.

407 citations

Book ChapterDOI
01 Jan 2013
TL;DR: The figures suggest that the UK should spend less in anticipation of cybercrime and more in response – that is, on the prosaic business of hunting down cyber-criminals and throwing them in jail.
Abstract: This chapter documents what we believe to be the first systematic study of the costs of cybercrime The initial workshop paper was prepared in response to a request from the UK Ministry of Defence following scepticism that previous studies had hyped the problem For each of the main categories of cybercrime we set out what is and is not known of the direct costs, indirect costs and defence costs – both to the UK and to the world as a whole We distinguish carefully between traditional crimes that are now “cyber” because they are conducted online (such as tax and welfare fraud); transitional crimes whose modus operandi has changed substantially as a result of the move online (such as credit card fraud); new crimes that owe their existence to the Internet; and what we might call platform crimes such as the provision of botnets which facilitate other crimes rather than being used to extract money from victims directly As far as direct costs are concerned, we find that traditional offences such as tax and welfare fraud cost the typical citizen in the low hundreds of pounds/euros/dollars a year; transitional frauds cost a few pounds/euros/dollars; while the new computer crimes cost in the tens of pence/cents However, the indirect costs and defence costs are much higher for transitional and new crimes For the former they may be roughly comparable to what the criminals earn, while for the latter they may be an order of magnitude more As a striking example, the botnet behind a third of the spam sent in 2010 earned its owners around $27 million, while worldwide expenditures on spam prevention probably exceeded a billion dollars We are extremely inefficient at fighting cybercrime; or to put it another way, cyber-crooks are like terrorists or metal thieves in that their activities impose disproportionate costs on society Some of the reasons for this are well-known: cybercrimes are global and have strong externalities, while traditional crimes such as burglary and car theft are local, and the associated equilibria have emerged after many years of optimisation As for the more direct question of what should be done, our figures suggest that we should spend less in anticipation of cybercrime (on antivirus, firewalls, etc) and more in response – that is, on the prosaic business of hunting down cyber-criminals and throwing them in jail

397 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Majid Yar1
TL;DR: The authors argued that cyber-crime is not qualitatively different from "terrestrial crime" and compared it to the phenomenon of cyber-terrorism, and pointed out the similarities between cyber-cybercrime and extraterrestrial crime.
Abstract: Recent discussions of ‘cybercrime’ focus upon the apparent novelty or otherwise of the phenomenon. Some authors claim that such crime is not qualitatively different from ‘terrestrial crime’, and ca...

391 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: With the revelation that Facebook handed over personally identifiable information of more than 87 million users to Cambridge Analytica, it is now imperative that comprehensive privacy policy laws be developed.
Abstract: With the revelation that Facebook handed over personally identifiable information of more than 87 million users to Cambridge Analytica, it is now imperative that comprehensive privacy policy laws be developed. Technologists, researchers, and innovators should meaningfully contribute to the development of these policies.

385 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20242
2023397
2022841
2021331
2020326
2019365