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Delay-tolerant networking

About: Delay-tolerant networking is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 3405 publications have been published within this topic receiving 116006 citations. The topic is also known as: DTN & disruption-tolerant networking.


Papers
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01 Jan 2002
TL;DR: A survey of mobility models that are used in the simulations of ad hoc networks and illustrates how the performance results of an ad hoc network protocol drastically change as a result of changing the mobility model simulated.

4,618 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
Kevin Fall1
25 Aug 2003
TL;DR: This work proposes a network architecture and application interface structured around optionally-reliable asynchronous message forwarding, with limited expectations of end-to-end connectivity and node resources.
Abstract: The highly successful architecture and protocols of today's Internet may operate poorly in environments characterized by very long delay paths and frequent network partitions. These problems are exacerbated by end nodes with limited power or memory resources. Often deployed in mobile and extreme environments lacking continuous connectivity, many such networks have their own specialized protocols, and do not utilize IP. To achieve interoperability between them, we propose a network architecture and application interface structured around optionally-reliable asynchronous message forwarding, with limited expectations of end-to-end connectivity and node resources. The architecture operates as an overlay above the transport layers of the networks it interconnects, and provides key services such as in-network data storage and retransmission, interoperable naming, authenticated forwarding and a coarse-grained class of service.

3,511 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
22 Aug 2005
TL;DR: A new routing scheme, called Spray and Wait, that "sprays" a number of copies into the network, and then "waits" till one of these nodes meets the destination, which outperforms all existing schemes with respect to both average message delivery delay and number of transmissions per message delivered.
Abstract: Intermittently connected mobile networks are sparse wireless networks where most of the time there does not exist a complete path from the source to the destination. These networks fall into the general category of Delay Tolerant Networks. There are many real networks that follow this paradigm, for example, wildlife tracking sensor networks, military networks, inter-planetary networks, etc. In this context, conventional routing schemes would fail.To deal with such networks researchers have suggested to use flooding-based routing schemes. While flooding-based schemes have a high probability of delivery, they waste a lot of energy and suffer from severe contention, which can significantly degrade their performance. Furthermore, proposed efforts to significantly reduce the overhead of flooding-based schemes have often be plagued by large delays. With this in mind, we introduce a new routing scheme, called Spray and Wait, that "sprays" a number of copies into the network, and then "waits" till one of these nodes meets the destination.Using theory and simulations we show that Spray and Wait outperforms all existing schemes with respect to both average message delivery delay and number of transmissions per message delivered; its overall performance is close to the optimal scheme. Furthermore, it is highly scalable retaining good performance under a large range of scenarios, unlike other schemes. Finally, it is simple to implement and to optimize in order to achieve given performance goals in practice.

2,712 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article takes advantage of the inherent redundancy in ad hoc networks-multiple routes between nodes-to defend routing against denial-of-service attacks and uses replication and new cryptographic schemes to build a highly secure and highly available key management service, which terms the core of this security framework.
Abstract: Ad hoc networks are a new wireless networking paradigm for mobile hosts. Unlike traditional mobile wireless networks, ad hoc networks do not rely on any fixed infrastructure. Instead, hosts rely on each other to keep the network connected. Military tactical and other security-sensitive operations are still the main applications of ad hoc networks, although there is a trend to adopt ad hoc networks for commercial uses due to their unique properties. One main challenge in the design of these networks is their vulnerability to security attacks. In this article, we study the threats on ad hoc network faces and the security goals to be achieved. We identify the new challenges and opportunities posed by this new networking environment and explore new approaches to secure its communication. In particular, we take advantage of the inherent redundancy in ad hoc networks-multiple routes between nodes-to defend routing against denial-of-service attacks. We also use replication and new cryptographic schemes, such as threshold cryptography, to build a highly secure and highly available key management service, which terms the core of our security framework.

2,661 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
23 Apr 2006
TL;DR: The evaluations show that MaxProp performs better than protocols that have access to an oracle that knows the schedule of meetings between peers, and performs well in a wide variety of DTN environments.
Abstract: Disruption-tolerant networks (DTNs) attempt to route network messages via intermittently connected nodes. Routing in such environments is difficult because peers have little information about the state of the partitioned network and transfer opportunities between peers are of limited duration. In this paper, we propose MaxProp, a protocol for effective routing of DTN messages. MaxProp is based on prioritizing both the schedule of packets transmitted to other peers and the schedule of packets to be dropped. These priorities are based on the path likelihoods to peers according to historical data and also on several complementary mechanisms, including acknowledgments, a head-start for new packets, and lists of previous intermediaries. Our evaluations show that MaxProp performs better than protocols that have access to an oracle that knows the schedule of meetings between peers. Our evaluations are based on 60 days of traces from a real DTN network we have deployed on 30 buses. Our network, called UMassDieselNet, serves a large geographic area between five colleges. We also evaluate MaxProp on simulated topologies and show it performs well in a wide variety of DTN environments.

2,148 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202311
202226
202155
202060
201994
201897