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Diamond-like carbon

About: Diamond-like carbon is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 5674 publications have been published within this topic receiving 111342 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors describe the deposition methods, deposition mechanisms, characterisation methods, electronic structure, gap states, defects, doping, luminescence, field emission, mechanical properties and some applications of diamond-like carbon.
Abstract: Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is a metastable form of amorphous carbon with significant sp3 bonding. DLC is a semiconductor with a high mechanical hardness, chemical inertness, and optical transparency. This review will describe the deposition methods, deposition mechanisms, characterisation methods, electronic structure, gap states, defects, doping, luminescence, field emission, mechanical properties and some applications of DLCs. The films have widespread applications as protective coatings in areas, such as magnetic storage disks, optical windows and micro-electromechanical devices (MEMs).

5,400 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is shown how to use resonant Raman spectroscopy to determine structure and composition of carbon films with and without nitrogen, and the assignment of the peaks at 1150 and 1480 cm−1 often observed in nanodiamond.
Abstract: Raman spectroscopy is a standard characterization technique for any carbon system. Here we review the Raman spectra of amorphous, nanostructured, diamond-like carbon and nanodiamond. We show how to use resonant Raman spectroscopy to determine structure and composition of carbon films with and without nitrogen. The measured spectra change with varying excitation energy. By visible and ultraviolet excitation measurements, the G peak dispersion can be derived and correlated with key parameters, such as density, sp(3) content, elastic constants and chemical composition. We then discuss the assignment of the peaks at 1150 and 1480 cm(-1) often observed in nanodiamond. We review the resonant Raman, isotope substitution and annealing experiments, which lead to the assignment of these peaks to trans-polyacetylene.

2,172 citations

Book
11 Feb 1979

1,250 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have attracted an overwhelming interest from both industry and the research community as mentioned in this paper, and they offer a wide range of exceptional physical, mechanical, biomedical and tribological properties that make them commercially essential for numerous industrial applications.
Abstract: During the past two decades, diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have attracted an overwhelming interest from both industry and the research community. These films offer a wide range of exceptional physical, mechanical, biomedical and tribological properties that make them scientifically very fascinating and commercially essential for numerous industrial applications. Mechanically, certain DLC films are extremely hard (as hard as 90 GPa) and resilient, while tribologically they provide some of the lowest known friction and wear coefficients. Their optical and electrical properties are also extraordinary and can be tailored to meet the specific requirements of a given application. Because of their excellent chemical inertness, these films are resistant to corrosive and/or oxidative attacks in acidic and saline media. The combination of such a wide range of outstanding properties in one material is rather uncommon, so DLC can be very useful in meeting the multifunctional application needs of advanced mechanical systems. In fact, these films are now used in numerous industrial applications, including razor blades, magnetic hard discs, critical engine parts, mechanical face seals, scratch-resistant glasses, invasive and implantable medical devices and microelectromechanical systems. DLC films are primarily made of carbon atoms that are extracted or derived from carbon-containing sources, such as solid carbon targets and liquid and gaseous forms of hydrocarbons and fullerenes. Depending on the type of carbon source being used during the film deposition, the type of bonds (i.e. sp 1 ,s p 2 ,s p 3 ) that hold carbon atoms together in DLC may vary a great deal and can affect their mechanical, electrical, optical and tribological properties. Recent systematic studies of DLC films have confirmed that the presence or absence of certain elemental species, such as hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur, silicon, tungsten, titanium and fluorine, in their microstructure can also play significant roles in their properties. The main goal of this review paper is to highlight the most recent developments in the synthesis, characterization and application of DLC films. We will also discuss the progress made in understanding the fundamental mechanisms that control their very unique friction and wear behaviours. Novel design concepts and the principles of superlubricity in DLC films are also presented. (Some figures in this article are in colour only in the electronic version)

1,046 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the structures of various types of amorphous carbon films and common characterization techniques are described, which can be classified as polymer-like, diamond-like or graphite-like based on the main binding framework.

1,004 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202390
2022161
2021144
2020133
2019158
2018173