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Digital art

About: Digital art is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 1782 publications have been published within this topic receiving 18661 citations.


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Book
01 Jan 1999
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors propose a theory of immediacy, hypermediacy and remediation mediation and network of remediation networks of networked self conclusion for virtual reality mediated spaces.
Abstract: Part 1 Theory: immediacy, hypermediacy and remediation mediation and remediation networks of remediation. Part 2 Media: computer games digital photography photorealistic graphics digital art film virtual reality mediated spaces television the World Wide Web ubiquitous computing convergence. Part 3 Self: the remediated self the virtual self the networked self conclusion.

3,393 citations

Book
01 Jan 2002
TL;DR: Parables for the Virtual as discussed by the authors is an interesting combination of cultural theory, science, and philosophy that asserts itself in a crystalline and multi-faceted argument, and it can be seen as an alternative approach for the wedding of scientific and cultural theory.
Abstract: Although the body has been the focus of much contemporary cultural theory, the models that are typically applied neglect the most salient characteristics of embodied existence—movement, affect, and sensation—in favor of concepts derived from linguistic theory. In Parables for the Virtual Brian Massumi views the body and media such as television, film, and the Internet, as cultural formations that operate on multiple registers of sensation beyond the reach of the reading techniques founded on the standard rhetorical and semiotic models. Renewing and assessing William James’s radical empiricism and Henri Bergson’s philosophy of perception through the filter of the post-war French philosophy of Deleuze, Guattari, and Foucault, Massumi links a cultural logic of variation to questions of movement, affect, and sensation. If such concepts are as fundamental as signs and significations, he argues, then a new set of theoretical issues appear, and with them potential new paths for the wedding of scientific and cultural theory. Replacing the traditional opposition of literal and figural with new distinctions between stasis and motion and between actual and virtual, Parables for the Virtual tackles related theoretical issues by applying them to cultural mediums as diverse as architecture, body art, the digital art of Stelarc, and Ronald Reagan’s acting career. The result is an intriguing combination of cultural theory, science, and philosophy that asserts itself in a crystalline and multi-faceted argument. Parables for the Virtual will interest students and scholars of continental and Anglo-American philosophy, cultural studies, cognitive science, electronic art, digital culture, and chaos theory, as well as those concerned with the “science wars” and the relation between the humanities and the sciences in general.

3,175 citations

Book
01 Mar 2004
TL;DR: Hansen as discussed by the authors argued that the human body filters information to create images rather than simply receiving images as pre-existing technical forms, and argued that this new "embodied" status of the frame corresponds directly to the digital revolution.
Abstract: In New Philosophy for New Media Mark Hansen defines the image in digital art in terms that go beyond the merely visual. Arguing that the "digital image" encompasses the entire process by which information is made perceivable, he places the body in a privileged position - as the agent that filters information in order to create images. By doing so, he counters prevailing notions of technological transcendence and argues for the indispensability of the human in the digital era. Hansen examines new media art and theory in light of Henri Bergson's argument that affection and memory render perception impure - that we select only those images precisely relevant to our singular form of embodiment. Hansen updates this argument for the digital age, arguing that we filter the information we receive to create images rather than simply receiving images as pre-existing technical forms. This framing function yields what Hansen calls the "digital image." He argues that this new "embodied" status of the frame corresponds directly to the digital revolution: a digitised image is not a fixed representation of "reality," but is defined by its complete flexibility and accessibility. It is not just that the interactivity of new media turns viewers into users; the image itself has become the body's process of perceiving it. To illustrate his account of how the body filters information in order to create images, Hansen focuses on new media artists who follow a "Bergsonist vocation"; through concrete engagement with the work of artists like Jeffrey Shaw, Douglas Gordon, and Bill Viola, Hansen explores the contemporary aesthetic investment in the affective, bodily basis of vision. The book includes over 70 illustrations (in both black and white and colour) from the works of these and many other new media artists.

478 citations

Book
01 Sep 1992
TL;DR: Part 1: personal view, structure of book system - overview of system winsom - geometry and algorithms for "what I can see", lighting and rendering, texture, tay-tracer interactive graphics - picture style and hardware.
Abstract: Part 1: personal view, structure of book system - overview of system winsom - geometry and algorithms for "what I can see", lighting and rendering, texture, tay-tracer interactive graphics - picture style and hardware, interactive graphics software, view manipulation, interaction animation - preview, final ESME and graphics programming - high level language, function image output - screen hard copy. Part 2 Art specific: art overview form design mutator animation conclusion.

425 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Fausto Bernardini1, Holly Rushmeier1, Ioana M. Martin1, Joshua Mittleman1, Gabriel Taubin1 
TL;DR: The goal wasn't simply to produce the statue's model but also to provide the art historian with material and tools to enable him to answer his own research questions and to develop scanning technology accessible to other cultural heritage projects both in terms of cost and usability.
Abstract: We present the methodology we used to acquire the data and construct a computer model of Michelangelo's Florentine Pieta with enough detail and accuracy to make it useful in scientific studies. We describe the project to acquire and build the 3D model. The work we describe is unique in that an art historian, not a technologist, conceived and specified the project. Our goal wasn't simply to produce the statue's model but also to provide the art historian with material and tools to enable him to answer his own research questions. The project gave us the opportunity to explore the value of 3D scanning and visualization in a nontechnical discipline, art history. The project's second goal was to develop scanning technology accessible to other cultural heritage projects both in terms of cost and usability.

270 citations


Network Information
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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202335
202271
202181
202075
2019105
201899