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Digital mammography

About: Digital mammography is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 3483 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 70266 citation(s).


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The overall diagnostic accuracy of digital and film mammography as a means of screening for breast cancer is similar, but digital mammography is more accurate in women under the age of 50 years, women with radiographically dense breasts, and premenopausal or perimenopausal women.
Abstract: background Film mammography has limited sensitivity for the detection of breast cancer in women with radiographically dense breasts. We assessed whether the use of digital mammography would avoid some of these limitations. methods A total of 49,528 asymptomatic women presenting for screening mammography at 33 sites in the United States and Canada underwent both digital and film mammography. All relevant information was available for 42,760 of these women (86.3 percent). Mammograms were interpreted independently by two radiologists. Breast-cancer status was ascertained on the basis of a breast biopsy done within 15 months after study entry or a follow-up mammogram obtained at least 10 months after study entry. Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the results. results In the entire population, the diagnostic accuracy of digital and film mammography was similar (difference between methods in the area under the ROC curve, 0.03; 95 percent confidence interval, i0.02 to 0.08; P=0.18). However, the accuracy of digital mammography was significantly higher than that of film mammography among women under the age of 50 years (difference in the area under the curve, 0.15; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.05 to 0.25; P=0.002), women with heterogeneously dense or extremely dense breasts on mammography (difference, 0.11; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.04 to 0.18; P=0.003), and premenopausal or perimenopausal women (difference, 0.15; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.05 to 0.24; P=0.002). conclusions The overall diagnostic accuracy of digital and film mammography as a means of screening for breast cancer is similar, but digital mammography is more accurate in women under the age of 50 years, women with radiographically dense breasts, and premenopausal or perimenopausal women. (clinicaltrials.gov number, NCT00008346.)

1,599 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess additional benefits and harms of either digital mammography or magnetic resonance imaging instead of film mammography as screening modalities for breast cancer.
Abstract: Description: Update of the 2002 U. S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation statement on screening for breast cancer in the general population. Methods: The USPSTF examined the evidence on the efficacy of 5 screening modalities in reducing mortality from breast cancer: film mammography, clinical breast examination, breast self-examination, digital mammography, and magnetic resonance imaging in order to update the 2002 recommendation. To accomplish this update, the USPSTF commissioned 2 studies: 1) a targeted systematic evidence review of 6 selected questions relating to benefits and harms of screening, and 2) a decision analysis that used population modeling techniques to compare the expected health outcomes and resource requirements of starting and ending mammography screening at different ages and using annual versus biennial screening intervals. Recommendations: The USPSTF recommends against routine screening mammography in women aged 40 to 49 years. The decision to start regular, biennial screening mammography before the age of 50 years should be an individual one and take into account patient context, including the patient's values regarding specific benefits and harms. (Grade C recommendation) The USPSTF recommends biennial screening mammography for women between the ages of 50 and 74 years. (Grade B recommendation) The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the additional benefits and harms of screening mammography in women 75 years or older. (I statement) The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the additional benefits and harms of clinical breast examination beyond screening mammography in women 40 years or older. (I statement) The USPSTF recommends against clinicians teaching women how to perform breast self-examination. (Grade D recommendation) The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess additional benefits and harms of either digital mammography or magnetic resonance imaging instead of film mammography as screening modalities for breast cancer. (I statement)

1,358 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
09 Mar 2005-JAMA
TL;DR: In the community, mammography remains the main screening tool while the effectiveness of clinical breast examination and self-examination are less, and new screening modalities are unlikely to replace mammography in the near future for screening the general population.
Abstract: ContextBreast cancer screening in community practices may be different from that in randomized controlled trials. New screening modalities are becoming available.ObjectivesTo review breast cancer screening, especially in the community and to examine evidence about new screening modalities.Data Sources and Study SelectionEnglish-language articles of randomized controlled trials assessing effectiveness of breast cancer screening were reviewed, as well as meta-analyses, systematic reviews, studies of breast cancer screening in the community, and guidelines. Also, studies of newer screening modalities were assessed.Data SynthesisAll major US medical organizations recommend screening mammography for women aged 40 years and older. Screening mammography reduces breast cancer mortality by about 20% to 35% in women aged 50 to 69 years and slightly less in women aged 40 to 49 years at 14 years of follow-up. Approximately 95% of women with abnormalities on screening mammograms do not have breast cancer with variability based on such factors as age of the woman and assessment category assigned by the radiologist. Studies comparing full-field digital mammography to screen film have not shown statistically significant differences in cancer detection while the impact on recall rates (percentage of screening mammograms considered to have positive results) was unclear. One study suggested that computer-aided detection increases cancer detection rates and recall rates while a second larger study did not find any significant differences. Screening clinical breast examination detects some cancers missed by mammography, but the sensitivity reported in the community is lower (28% to 36%) than in randomized trials (about 54%). Breast self-examination has not been shown to be effective in reducing breast cancer mortality, but it does increase the number of breast biopsies performed because of false-positives. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound are being studied for screening women at high risk for breast cancer but are not recommended for screening the general population. Sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging in high-risk women has been found to be much higher than that of mammography but specificity is generally lower. Effect of the magnetic resonance imaging on breast cancer mortality is not known. A balanced discussion of possible benefits and harms of screening should be undertaken with each woman.ConclusionsIn the community, mammography remains the main screening tool while the effectiveness of clinical breast examination and self-examination are less. New screening modalities are unlikely to replace mammography in the near future for screening the general population.

937 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Digital mammography did, however, perform significantly better than the film method in women less than 50 years of age, in those having heterogeneously dense or very dense breasts, and premenopausal or perimenopausal women.
Abstract: Previous trials, limited in many respects, have not found digital mammography to be significantly more accurate than the standard film method. A total of 42,760 asymptomatic women seen at 33 sites in the United States and Canada requested screening mammography and underwent both film and digital examinations. Two radiologists independently interpreted the film and digital mammograms. All participants either had breast biopsy within 15 months after evaluation or had a follow-up mammogram 10 months or longer after entry to the study. The results were assessed by receiver operating characteristic analysis. Both digital and film mammograms were positive in 0.5% of women. Another 2.2% had only a positive digital study, whereas 1.9% had only a positive film study. In the remaining women, approximately 95% of the total, both imaging studies were negative. Of 335 breast cancers diagnosed within 455 days after entry to the study, approximately three fourths were found within a year after evaluation. There were no substantial differences between the digital and film findings with respect to histology or stage of disease. The area under the curve was similar for the 2 studies and was not influenced by race or the risk of breast cancer. Digital mammography did, however, perform significantly better than the film method in women less than 50 years of age, in those having heterogeneously dense or very dense breasts, and premenopausal or perimenopausal women. The digital and film methods performed equally well in women age 50 years and older, those with fatty breasts or scattered fibroglandular densities, and those who were postmenopausal.

862 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The use of mammography plus tomosynthesis in a screening environment resulted in a significantly higher cancer detection rate and enabled the detection of more invasive cancers.
Abstract: We found a significant increase in cancer detection rates, particularly for invasive cancers, and a simultaneous decrease in false-positive rates with use of mammography plus tomosynthesis compared with mammography alone.

808 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20222
2021176
2020149
2019196
2018166
2017172