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Digital transformation

About: Digital transformation is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 8748 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 67717 citation(s).

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Papers
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Open accessJournal Article
Yoram Eshet-Alkalai1Institutions (1)
Abstract: Digital literacy involves more than the mere ability to use software or operate a digital device; it includes a large variety of complex cognitive, motor, sociological, and emotional skills, which users need in order to function effectively in digital environments. The tasks required in this context include, for example, “reading” instructions from graphical displays in user interfaces; using digital reproduction to create new, meaningful materials from existing ones; constructing knowledge from a nonlinear, hypertextual navigation; evaluating the quality and validity of information; and have a mature and realistic understanding of the “rules” that prevail in the cyberspace. This newly emerging concept of digital literacy may be used as a measure of the quality of learners’ work in digital environments, and provide scholars and developers with a more effective means of communication in designing better user-oriented environments. This article proposes a holistic, refined conceptual framework for digital literacy, which includes photo-visual literacy; reproduction literacy; branching literacy; information literacy; and socioemotional literacy.

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Topics: Digital literacy (77%), Digital transformation (68%), Computer literacy (64%) ...read more

724 Citations


Open accessBook
01 Jul 1999-
Abstract: From the Publisher: Principles of Digital Transmission is designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate level students and professions in telecommunications. Teachers and learners can mix and match chapters to create four distinct courses: (1) a one-term basic course in digital communications; (2) a one-term course in advanced digital communications; (3) a one-term course in information theory and coding; (4) a two-term course sequence in digital communications and coding. The book provides rigorous mathematical tools for the analysis and design of digital transmission systems. The authors emphasize methodology in their aim to teach the reader how to do it rather than how it is done. They apply the fundamental tools of the discipline onto a number of systems, such as wireless data transmission systems.

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684 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1007/S12599-015-0401-5
04 Aug 2015-
Abstract: In recent years, firms in almost all industries have conducted a number of initiatives to explore new digital technologies and to exploit their benefits. This frequently involves transformations of key business operations and affects products and processes, as well as organizational structures and management concepts. Companies need to establish management practices to govern these complex transformations. An important approach is to formulate a digital transformation strategy that serves as a central concept to integrate the entire coordination, prioritization, and implementation of digital transformations within a firm. The exploitation and integration of digital technologies often affect large parts of companies and even go beyond their borders, by impacting products, business processes, sales channels, and supply chains. Potential benefits of digitization are manifold and include increases in sales or productivity, innovations in value creation, as well as novel forms of interaction with customers, among others. As a result, entire business models can be reshaped or replaced (Downes and Nunes 2013). Owing to this wide scope and the far-reaching consequences, digital transformation strategies seek to coordinate and prioritize the many independent threads of digital transformation. To account for their company-spanning characteristics, digital transformation strategies cut across other business strategies and should be aligned with them (Fig. 1). While there are various concepts of IT strategies (Teubner 2013), these mostly define the current and the future operational activities, the necessary application systems and infrastructures, and the adequate organizational and financial framework for providing IT to carry out business operations within a company. Hence, IT strategies usually focus on the management of the IT infrastructure within a firm, with rather limited impact on driving innovations in business development. To some degree, this restricts the product-centric and customer-centric opportunities that arise from new digital technologies, which often cross firms’ borders. Further, IT strategies present systemcentric road maps to the future uses of technologies in a firm, but they do not necessarily account for the transformation of products, processes, and structural aspects that go along with the integration of technologies. Digital transformation strategies take on a different perspective and pursue different goals. Coming from a business-centric perspective, these strategies focus on the transformation of products, processes, and organizational aspects owing to new technologies. Their scope is more broadly designed and explicitly includes digital activities at the interface with or fully on the side of customers, such as Accepted after one revision by Prof. Dr. Sinz.

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Topics: Digital transformation (69%), Business model (57%), Information technology management (56%) ...read more

658 Citations


Open accessPosted Content
Abstract: In recent years, firms in almost all industries have conducted a number of initiatives to explore new digital technologies and to exploit their benefits. This frequently involves transformations of key business operations and affects products and processes, as well as organizational structures and management concepts. Companies need to establish management practices to govern these complex transformations. An important approach is to formulate a digital transformation strategy that serves as a central concept to integrate the entire coordination, prioritization, and implementation of digital transformations within a firm. The exploitation and integration of digital technologies often affect large parts of companies and even go beyond their borders, by impacting products, business processes, sales channels, and supply chains. Potential benefits of digitization are manifold and include increases in sales or productivity, innovations in value creation, as well as novel forms of interaction with customers, among others. As a result, entire business models can be reshaped or replaced (Downes and Nunes 2013). Owing to this wide scope and the far-reaching consequences, digital transformation strategies seek to coordinate and prioritize the many independent threads of digital transformation. To account for their company-spanning characteristics, digital transformation strategies cut across other business strategies and should be aligned with them (Fig. 1). While there are various concepts of IT strategies (Teubner 2013), these mostly define the current and the future operational activities, the necessary application systems and infrastructures, and the adequate organizational and financial framework for providing IT to carry out business operations within a company. Hence, IT strategies usually focus on the management of the IT infrastructure within a firm, with rather limited impact on driving innovations in business development. To some degree, this restricts the product-centric and customer-centric opportunities that arise from new digital technologies, which often cross firms’ borders. Further, IT strategies present systemcentric road maps to the future uses of technologies in a firm, but they do not necessarily account for the transformation of products, processes, and structural aspects that go along with the integration of technologies. Digital transformation strategies take on a different perspective and pursue different goals. Coming from a business-centric perspective, these strategies focus on the transformation of products, processes, and organizational aspects owing to new technologies. Their scope is more broadly designed and explicitly includes digital activities at the interface with or fully on the side of customers, such as Accepted after one revision by Prof. Dr. Sinz.

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Topics: Digital transformation (69%), Business model (57%), Information technology management (56%) ...read more

643 Citations


Open accessBook
26 Aug 2009-
Abstract: Digital communications is the foundation of modern telecommunications and digital signal processing. The second edition of Digital Communications is updated to include current techniques and systems used in the rapidly expanding field of fixed and mobile communications. The text has comprehensive coverage of digital communications without going into unnecessary detail or irrelevant topics. Its main aims are to develop the mathematical theory behind signal processing and use this knowledge to develop fixed and mobile data communications systems. This text is geared towards students who already have a technical understanding of electrical engineering from their introductory years at university and who wish to focus on digital communications. It covers everything these students will need to know, including modern techniques.

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Topics: Control communications (65%), Digital transformation (61%), Communications system (58%) ...read more

627 Citations


Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202270
20212,335
20202,057
20191,464
2018836
2017499

Top Attributes

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Topic's top 5 most impactful authors

Kurt Sandkuhl

22 papers, 112 citations

Alfred Zimmermann

21 papers, 137 citations

Thomas Hess

13 papers, 1.7K citations

Helmut Krcmar

13 papers, 103 citations

Erik P. M. Vermeulen

8 papers, 84 citations

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