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Dissemination

About: Dissemination is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 4295 publications have been published within this topic receiving 64361 citations. The topic is also known as: information dissemination.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A family of adaptive protocols that efficiently disseminate information among sensors in an energy-constrained wireless sensor network, called SPIN (Sensor Protocols for Information via Negotiation), that perform close to the theoretical optimum in both point-to-point and broadcast networks.
Abstract: In this paper, we present a family of adaptive protocols, called SPIN (Sensor Protocols for Information via Negotiation), that efficiently disseminate information among sensors in an energy-constrained wireless sensor network. Nodes running a SPIN communication protocol name their data using high-level data descriptors, called meta-data. They use meta-data negotiations to eliminate the transmission of redundant data throughout the network. In addition, SPIN nodes can base their communication decisions both upon application-specific knowledge of the data and upon knowledge of the resources that are available to them. This allows the sensors to efficiently distribute data given a limited energy supply. We simulate and analyze the performance of four specific SPIN protocols: SPIN-PP and SPIN-EC, which are optimized for a point-to-point network, and SPIN-BC and SPIN-RL, which are optimized for a broadcast network. Comparing the SPIN protocols to other possible approaches, we find that the SPIN protocols can deliver 60% more data for a given amount of energy than conventional approaches in a point-to-point network and 80% more data for a given amount of energy in a broadcast network. We also find that, in terms of dissemination rate and energy usage, the SPIN protocols perform close to the theoretical optimum in both point-to-point and broadcast networks.

1,185 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
03 Nov 2004
TL;DR: It appears very hard to significantly improve upon the rate obtained by Deluge and it is argued that the rates obtained for dissemination are inherently lower than that for single path propagation.
Abstract: To support network programming, we present Deluge, a reliable data dissemination protocol for propagating large data objects from one or more source nodes to many other nodes over a multihop, wireless sensor network. Deluge builds from prior work in density-aware, epidemic maintenance protocols. Using both a real-world deployment and simulation, we show that Deluge can reliably disseminate data to all nodes and characterize its overall performance. On Mica2-dot nodes, Deluge can push nearly 90 bytes/second, one-ninth the maximum transmission rate of the radio supported under TinyOS. Control messages are limited to 18% of all transmissions. At scale, the protocol exposes interesting propagation dynamics only hinted at by previous dissemination work. A simple model is also derived which describes the limits of data propagation in wireless networks. Finally, we argue that the rates obtained for dissemination are inherently lower than that for single path propagation. It appears very hard to significantly improve upon the rate obtained by Deluge and we identify establishing a tight lower bound as an open problem.

1,152 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
27 Jun 2011
TL;DR: This work proposes a more comprehensive metric, the average system information age, which captures the requirement of emerging applications to maintain current state information from all other nearby nodes, and designs an application-layer broadcast rate adaptation algorithm that effectively adapts the messaging rates and minimizes the system age.
Abstract: Emerging applications rely on wireless broadcast to disseminate time-critical information. For example, vehicular networks may exchange vehicle position and velocity information to enable safety applications. The number of nodes in one-hop communication range in such networks can be very large, leading to congestion and undesirable levels of packet collisions. Earlier work has examined such broadcasting protocols primarily from a MAC perspective and focused on selective aspects such as packet error rate. In this work, we propose a more comprehensive metric, the average system information age, which captures the requirement of such applications to maintain current state information from all other nearby nodes. We show that information age is minimized at an optimal operating point that lies between the extremes of maximum throughput and minimum delay. Further, while age can be minimized by saturating the MAC and setting the CW size to its throughput-optimal value, the same cannot be achieved without changes in existing hardware. Also, via simulations we show that simple contention window size adaptations like increasing or decreasing the window size are unsuitable for reducing age. This motivates our design of an application-layer broadcast rate adaptation algorithm. It uses local decisions at nodes in the network to adapt their messaging rate to keep the system age to a minimum. Our simulations and experiments with 300 ORBIT nodes show that the algorithm effectively adapts the messaging rates and minimizes the system age.

744 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
01 Oct 2004
TL;DR: A new efficient IEEE 802.11 based multi-hop broadcast protocol (UMB) which is designed to address the broadcast storm, hidden node, and reliability problems of multi-Hop broadcast in urban areas.
Abstract: Inter-Vehicle Communication Systems rely on multi-hop broadcast to disseminate information to locations beyond the transmission range of individual nodes. Message dissemination is especially difficult in urban areas crowded with tall buildings because of the line-of-sight problem. In this paper, we propose a new efficient IEEE 802.11 based multi-hop broadcast protocol (UMB) which is designed to address the broadcast storm, hidden node, and reliability problems of multi-hop broadcast in urban areas. Thisprotocol assigns the duty of forwarding and acknowledging broadcast packet to only one vehicle by dividing the road portion inside the transmission range into segments and choosing the vehicle in the furthest non-empty segment without apriori topology information. When there is an intersection in the path of the message dissemination, new directional broadcasts are initiated by the repeaters located at the intersections. We have shown through simulations that our protocol has a very high success rate and efficient channel utilization when compared with other flooding based protocols.

738 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: GHT, a Geographic Hash Table system for DCS on sensornets, is described, and it is demonstrated that GHT is the preferable approach for the application workloads, analytically predict, offers high data availability, and scales to large sensornet deployments, even when nodes fail or are mobile.
Abstract: Making effective use of the vast amounts of data gathered by large-scale sensor networks (sensornets) will require scalable, self-organizing, and energy-efficient data dissemination algorithms. For sensornets, where the content of the data is more important than the identity of the node that gathers them, researchers have found it useful to move away from the Internet's point-to-point communication abstraction and instead adopt abstractions that are more data-centric. This approach entails naming the data and using communication abstractions that refer to those names rather than to node network addresses [1,11]. Previous work on data-centric routing has shown it to be an energy-efficient data dissemination method for sensornets [12]. Herein, we argue that a companion method, data-centric storage (DCS), is also a useful approach. Under DCS, sensed data are stored at a node determined by the name associated with the sensed data. In this paper, we first define DCS and predict analytically where it outperforms other data dissemination approaches. We then describe GHT, a Geographic Hash Table system for DCS on sensornets. GHT hashes keys into geographic coordinates, and stores a key-value pair at the sensor node geographically nearest the hash of its key. The system replicates stored data locally to ensure persistence when nodes fail. It uses an efficient consistency protocol to ensure that key-value pairs are stored at the appropriate nodes after topological changes. And it distributes load throughout the network using a geographic hierarchy. We evaluate the performance of GHT as a DCS system in simulation against two other dissemination approaches. Our results demonstrate that GHT is the preferable approach for the application workloads we analytically predict, offers high data availability, and scales to large sensornet deployments, even when nodes fail or are mobile.

588 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
2023531
20221,184
2021162
2020196
2019210
2018224