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DNA methyltransferase

About: DNA methyltransferase is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 3508 publications have been published within this topic receiving 210457 citations. The topic is also known as: DNA metiltransferasi.


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Journal ArticleDOI
29 Oct 1999-Cell
TL;DR: It is demonstrated that two recently identified DNA methyltransferases, DnMT3a and Dnmt3b, are essential for de novo methylation and for mouse development and play important roles in normal development and disease.

5,708 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
12 Jun 1992-Cell
TL;DR: Results indicate that while a 3-fold reduction in levels of genomic m5C has no detectable effect on the viability or proliferation of ES cells in culture, a similar reduction of DNA methylation in embryos causes abnormal development and embryonic lethality.

3,994 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
02 May 2008-Cell
TL;DR: Deep sequencing of smRNAs revealed a direct relationship between the location of sm RNAs and DNA methylation, perturbation of smRNA biogenesis upon loss of CpG DNA methylisation, and a tendency for smRN as to direct strand-specific DNA methylations in regions of RNA-DNA homology.

2,349 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
25 Nov 1993-Nature
TL;DR: It is demonstrated that a normal level of DNA methylation is required for controlling differential expression of the paternal and maternal alleles of imprinted genes in mutant mice that are deficient in DNA methyltransferase activity.
Abstract: The paternal and maternal genomes are not equivalent and both are required for mammalian development. The difference between the parental genomes is believed to be due to gamete-specific differential modification, a process known as genomic imprinting. The study of transgene methylation has shown that methylation patterns can be inherited in a parent-of-origin-specific manner, suggesting that DNA methylation may play a role in genomic imprinting. The functional significance of DNA methylation in genomic imprinting was strengthened by the recent finding that CpG islands (or sites) in three imprinted genes, H19, insulin-like growth factor 2 (Igf-2), and Igf-2 receptor (Igf-2r), are differentially methylated depending on their parental origin. We have examined the expression of these three imprinted genes in mutant mice that are deficient in DNA methyltransferase activity. We report here that expression of all three genes was affected in mutant embryos: the normally silent paternal allele of the H19 gene was activated, whereas the normally active paternal allele of the Igf-2 gene and the active maternal allele of the Igf-2r gene were repressed. Our results demonstrate that a normal level of DNA methylation is required for controlling differential expression of the paternal and maternal alleles of imprinted genes.

2,081 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: There are multiple families of DNA (cytosine-5) methyltransferases in eukaryotes, and each family appears to be controlled by different regulatory inputs.
Abstract: Ke yW ords 5-methylcytosine, DNA methyltransferase, transposons, genomic imprinting ■ Abstract Large-genome eukaryotes use heritable cytosine methylation to silence promoters, especially those associated with transposons and imprinted genes. Cytosine methylation does not reinforce or replace ancestral gene regulation pathways but instead endows methylated genomes with the ability to repress specific promoters in a manner that is buffered against changes in the internal and external environment. Recent studies have shown that the targeting of de novo methylation depends on multiple inputs; these include the interaction of repeated sequences, local states of histone lysine methylation, small RNAs and components of the RNAi pathway, and divergent and catalytically inert cytosine methyltransferase homologues that have acquired regulatory roles. There are multiple families of DNA (cytosine-5) methyltransferases in eukaryotes, and each family appears to be controlled by different regulatory inputs. Sequence-specific DNA- binding proteins, which regulate most aspects of gene expression, do not appear to be involved in the establishment or maintenance of genomic methylation patterns.

2,020 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
2023166
2022116
2021165
2020184
2019166
2018155