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Dyeing

About: Dyeing is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 32786 publications have been published within this topic receiving 197055 citations. The topic is also known as: textile dyeing.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The use of whole bacterial cells for the reduction of water-soluble dyes present in textile dyeing wastewater has been investigated in this paper, with a focus on the use of bacteria-polymer composites for the removal of colour from reactive dye effluents.

1,455 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The presence of sulphur, naphthol, vat dyes, nitrates, acetic acid, soaps, enzymes chromium compounds and heavy metals all collectively make the textile effluent highly toxic.
Abstract: Color is the main attraction of any fabric. No matter how excellent its constitution, if unsuitably colored it is bound to be a failure as a commercial fabric. Manufacture and use of synthetic dyes for fabric dyeing has therefore become a massive industry today. In fact the art of applying color to fabric has been known to mankind since 3500 BC. WH Perkins in 1856 discovered the use of synthetic dyes. Synthetic dyes have provided a wide range of colorfast, bright hues. However their toxic nature has become a cause of grave concern to environmentalists. Use of synthetic dyes has an adverse effect on all forms of life. Presence of sulphur, naphthol, vat dyes, nitrates, acetic acid, soaps, enzymes chromium compounds and heavy metals like copper, arsenic, lead, cad- mium, mercury, nickel, and cobalt and certain auxiliary chemicals all collectively make the textile effluent highly toxic. Other harmful chemicals present in the water may be formaldehyde based dye fixing agents, chlorinated stain removers, hydro carbon based softeners, non bio degradable dyeing chemicals. These organic materials react with many disinfectants especially chlorine and form by products (DBP’S) that are often carcinogenic and therefore undesirable. Many of these show allergic reactions. The colloidal matter present along with colors and oily scum increases the turbidity, gives the water a bad appearance and foul smell and prevents the penetration of sunlight necessary for the process of photosynthesis. This in turn interferes with the Oxygen transfer mechanism at air water interface which in turn interferes with marine life and self purification process of water. This effluent if allowed to flow in the fields’ clogs the pores of the soil resulting in loss of soil productivity. If allowed to flow in drains and rivers it effects the quality of drinking water in hand pumps making it unfit for human consumption. It is important to remove these pollutants from the waste waters before their final disposal.

889 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the problem of colour in textile effluents, the different classes of dyes available and their contribution to the problem are examined with particular reference to reactive azo dyes used in cotton processing.
Abstract: This paper aims to review the problem of colour in textile effluents, the different classes of dyes available and their contribution to the problem. Through new regulations, pressure is being placed on water companies all over the world to reduce the amount of colour in sewage effluent. Dyes exhibit low toxicity to mammals and aquatic organisms and therefore colour consents are normally applied for aesthetic and industrial reasons rather than for prevention of toxicity. The absorbance, ADMI values and concentrations of dyes in effluent are examined here with particular reference to reactive azo dyes used in cotton processing. Colour consents, the problem of colour in textile wastewaters and the importance for research in this area are also discussed. Dye concentrations of 0.01 g dm−3 up to 0.25 g dm−3 have been cited as being present in dyehouse effluent, depending on the dyes and processes used. ADMI values ranged from 50 to 3890 units for the dyeing of cotton. It was concluded that 1500 ADMI units was a reasonable value to aim for when simulating coloured effluents. Simulated textile effluents may be used for research purposes. These should resemble real wastes as closely as possible, but it is often difficult to replicate the ADMI values, absorbance and spectra of real effluents. The concentrations of dye used in simulated effluents examined in literature varied from 0.01 g dm−3 to 7 g dm−3. As absorbance and ADMI values change with the types of dye used, it is difficult to relate these values to dye concentrations. A concentration of 0.18 g dm−3 of a Red or Yellow dye or 0.43 g dm−3 of a blue dye would provide an ADMI of approximately 1500 units and fits within the range of dye concentrations presented in literature. A dye mixture simulating colour in a real textile effluent is suggested and some limitations of simulating actual wastewaters discussed. © 1999 Society of Chemical Industry

864 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a review of the effect of a variety of conditions on TiO2-photocatalysed decoloration of dyes, such as amount of catalyst, reaction pH, light intensity, concentration of organic dye, and the presence of additives such as ions, is presented.

796 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Tametes hirsuta and a purified laccase from this organism were able to degrade triarylmethane, indigoid, azo, and anthraquinonic dyes and reduced their toxicities by up to 80%.
Abstract: Trametes hirsuta and a purified laccase from this organism were able to degrade triarylmethane, indigoid, azo, and anthraquinonic dyes. Initial decolorization velocities depended on the substituents on the phenolic rings of the dyes. Immobilization of the T. hirsuta laccase on alumina enhanced the thermal stabilities of the enzyme and its tolerance against some enzyme inhibitors, such as halides, copper chelators, and dyeing additives. The laccase lost 50% of its activity at 50 mM NaCl while the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of the immobilized enzyme was 85 mM. Treatment of dyes with the immobilized laccase reduced their toxicities (based on the oxygen consumption rate of Pseudomonas putida) by up to 80% (anthraquinonic dyes). Textile effluents decolorized with T. hirsuta or the laccase were used for dyeing. Metabolites and/or enzyme protein strongly interacted with the dyeing process indicated by lower staining levels (K/S) values than obtained with a blank using water. However, when the effluents were decolorized with immobilized laccase, they could be used for dyeing and acceptable color differences (DeltaE*) below 1.1 were measured for most dyes.

729 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
2023520
2022977
2021542
2020931
20191,855
20182,237