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Dysplasia

About: Dysplasia is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 16915 publications have been published within this topic receiving 469263 citations. The topic is also known as: Cell Transformation, Neoplastic & neoplastic cell transformation.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Modifications of the Task Force Criteria for the clinical diagnosis of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia represent a working framework to improve the diagnosis and management of this condition.
Abstract: Background— In 1994, an International Task Force proposed criteria for the clinical diagnosis of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) that facilitated recognition and ...

2,400 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Aug 2000-Gut
TL;DR: The differences between Western and Japanese pathologists in the diagnostic classification of gastrointestinal epithelial neoplastic lesions can be resolved largely by adopting the proposed terminology, which is based on cytological and architectural severity and invasion status.
Abstract: Background—Use of the conventional Western and Japanese classification systems of gastrointestinal epithelial neoplasia results in large diVerences among pathologists in the diagnosis of oesophageal, gastric, and colorectal neoplastic lesions. Aim—To develop common worldwide terminology for gastrointestinal epithelial neoplasia. Methods—Thirty one pathologists from 12 countries reviewed 35 gastric, 20 colorectal, and 21 oesophageal biopsy and resection specimens. The extent of diagnostic agreement between those with Western and Japanese viewpoints was assessed by kappa statistics. The pathologists met in Vienna to discuss the results and to develop a new consensus terminology. Results—The large diVerences between the conventional Western and Japanese diagnoses were confirmed (percentage of specimens for which there was agreement and kappa values: 37% and 0.16 for gastric; 45% and 0.27 for colorectal; and 14% and 0.01 for oesophageal lesions). There was much better agreement among pathologists (71% and 0.55 for gastric; 65% and 0.47 for colorectal; and 62% and 0.31 for oesophageal lesions) when the original assessments of the specimens were regrouped into the categories of the proposed Vienna classification of gastrointestinal epithelial neoplasia: (1) negative for neoplasia/dysplasia, (2) indefinite for neoplasia/dysplasia, (3) non-invasive low grade neoplasia (low grade adenoma/ dysplasia), (4) non-invasive high grade neoplasia (high grade adenoma/ dysplasia, non-invasive carcinoma and suspicion of invasive carcinoma), and (5) invasive neoplasia (intramucosal carcinoma, submucosal carcinoma or beyond). Conclusion—The diVerences between Western and Japanese pathologists in the diagnostic classification of gastrointestinal epithelial neoplastic lesions can be resolved largely by adopting the proposed terminology, which is based on cytological and architectural severity and invasion status. (Gut 2000;47:251‐255)

1,940 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Colonoscopic screening can detect advanced colonic neoplasms in asymptomatic adults with or without distal neoplasia, and many of these neoplasm would not be detected with sigmoidoscopy.
Abstract: Background and Methods The role of colonoscopy in screening for colorectal cancer is uncertain. At 13 Veterans Affairs medical centers, we performed colonoscopy to determine the prevalence and location of advanced colonic neoplasms and the risk of advanced proximal neoplasia in asymptomatic patients (age range, 50 to 75 years) with or without distal neoplasia. Advanced colonic neoplasia was defined as an adenoma that was 10 mm or more in diameter, a villous adenoma, an adenoma with high-grade dysplasia, or invasive cancer. In patients with more than one neoplastic lesion, classification was based on the most advanced lesion. Results Of 17,732 patients screened for enrollment, 3196 were enrolled; 3121 of the enrolled patients (97.7 percent) underwent complete examination of the colon. The mean age of the patients was 62.9 years, and 96.8 percent were men. Colonoscopic examination showed one or more neoplastic lesions in 37.5 percent of the patients, an adenoma with a diameter of at least 10 mm or a villous...

1,827 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A classification system for the epithelial changes that occur in ulcerative colitis was developed, which should be applicable to other forms of inflammatory bowel disease as well and makes use of standardized terminology, addresses specific problem areas, and offers practical solutions.

1,730 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In patients with dysplastic Barrett's esophagus, radiofrequency ablation was associated with a high rate of complete eradication of both dysplasia and intestinal metaplasia, and a reduced risk of disease progression.
Abstract: Background Barrett’s esophagus, a condition of intestinal metaplasia of the esophagus, is associated with an increased risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma. We assessed whether endoscopic radiofrequency ablation could eradicate dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus and decrease the rate of neoplastic progression. Methods In a multicenter, sham-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 127 patients with dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus in a 2:1 ratio to receive either radiofrequency ablation (ablation group) or a sham procedure (control group). Randomization was stratified according to the grade of dysplasia and the length of Barrett’s esophagus. Primary outcomes at 12 months included the complete eradication of dysplasia and intestinal metaplasia. Results In the intention-to-treat analyses, among patients with low-grade dysplasia, complete eradication of dysplasia occurred in 90.5% of those in the ablation group, as compared with 22.7% of those in the control group (P<0.001). Among patients with highgrade dysplasia, complete eradication occurred in 81.0% of those in the ablation group, as compared with 19.0% of those in the control group (P<0.001). Overall, 77.4% of patients in the ablation group had complete eradication of intestinal metaplasia, as compared with 2.3% of those in the control group (P<0.001). Patients in the ablation group had less disease progression (3.6% vs. 16.3%, P = 0.03) and fewer cancers (1.2% vs. 9.3%, P = 0.045). Patients reported having more chest pain after the ablation procedure than after the sham procedure. In the ablation group, one patient had upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and five patients (6.0%) had esophageal stricture. Conclusions In patients with dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus, radiofrequency ablation was associated with a high rate of complete eradication of both dysplasia and intestinal metaplasia and a reduced risk of disease progression. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00282672.)

1,231 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20241
2023874
20221,346
2021556
2020534
2019564