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Effective input noise temperature

About: Effective input noise temperature is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 5831 publications have been published within this topic receiving 85675 citations.


Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
24 Mar 1975
TL;DR: It is shown that in treating periodic interference the adaptive noise canceller acts as a notch filter with narrow bandwidth, infinite null, and the capability of tracking the exact frequency of the interference; in this case the canceller behaves as a linear, time-invariant system, with the adaptive filter converging on a dynamic rather than a static solution.
Abstract: This paper describes the concept of adaptive noise cancelling, an alternative method of estimating signals corrupted by additive noise or interference. The method uses a "primary" input containing the corrupted signal and a "reference" input containing noise correlated in some unknown way with the primary noise. The reference input is adaptively filtered and subtracted from the primary input to obtain the signal estimate. Adaptive filtering before subtraction allows the treatment of inputs that are deterministic or stochastic, stationary or time variable. Wiener solutions are developed to describe asymptotic adaptive performance and output signal-to-noise ratio for stationary stochastic inputs, including single and multiple reference inputs. These solutions show that when the reference input is free of signal and certain other conditions are met noise in the primary input can be essentiany eliminated without signal distortion. It is further shown that in treating periodic interference the adaptive noise canceller acts as a notch filter with narrow bandwidth, infinite null, and the capability of tracking the exact frequency of the interference; in this case the canceller behaves as a linear, time-invariant system, with the adaptive filter converging on a dynamic rather than a static solution. Experimental results are presented that illustrate the usefulness of the adaptive noise cancelling technique in a variety of practical applications. These applications include the cancelling of various forms of periodic interference in electrocardiography, the cancelling of periodic interference in speech signals, and the cancelling of broad-band interference in the side-lobes of an antenna array. In further experiments it is shown that a sine wave and Gaussian noise can be separated by using a reference input that is a delayed version of the primary input. Suggested applications include the elimination of tape hum or turntable rumble during the playback of recorded broad-band signals and the automatic detection of very-low-level periodic signals masked by broad-band noise.

4,165 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Feb 1966

2,440 citations

Proceedings ArticleDOI
02 Apr 1979
TL;DR: This paper describes a method for enhancing speech corrupted by broadband noise based on the spectral noise subtraction method, which can automatically adapt to a wide range of signal-to-noise ratios, as long as a reasonable estimate of the noise spectrum can be obtained.
Abstract: This paper describes a method for enhancing speech corrupted by broadband noise. The method is based on the spectral noise subtraction method. The original method entails subtracting an estimate of the noise power spectrum from the speech power spectrum, setting negative differences to zero, recombining the new power spectrum with the original phase, and then reconstructing the time waveform. While this method reduces the broadband noise, it also usually introduces an annoying "musical noise". We have devised a method that eliminates this "musical noise" while further reducing the background noise. The method consists in subtracting an overestimate of the noise power spectrum, and preventing the resultant spectral components from going below a preset minimum level (spectral floor). The method can automatically adapt to a wide range of signal-to-noise ratios, as long as a reasonable estimate of the noise spectrum can be obtained. Extensive listening tests were performed to determine the quality and intelligibility of speech enhanced by our method. Listeners unanimously preferred the quality of the processed speech. Also, for an input signal-to-noise ratio of 5 dB, there was no loss of intelligibility associated with the enhancement technique.

1,352 citations

Book
01 Jan 1986
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors propose a method to generate 1/f noise noise in particular Amplifier Circuits Mixers by using thermal noise shot and flicker noise, respectively.
Abstract: Mathematical Methods Noise Characterization Noise Measurements Thermal Noise Shot Noise Generation - Recombination Noise Flicker Noise or 1/f Noise Noise in Particular Amplifier Circuits Mixers Miscellaneous Problems Appendixes Index.

1,134 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
H.T. Friis1
01 Jul 1944
TL;DR: In this article, a rigorous definition of the noise figure of radio receivers is given, which can be applied to four-terminal networks in general and is not limited to high-gain receivers.
Abstract: A rigorous definition of the noise figure of radio receivers is given in this paper. The definition is not limited to high-gain receivers, but can be applied to four-terminal networks in general. An analysis is made of the relationship between the noise figure of the receiver as a whole and the noise figures of its components. Mismatch relations between the components of the receiver and methods of measurements of noise figures are discussed briefly.

789 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202311
202228
20201
20191
20185
2017105