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Egyptology

About: Egyptology is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 642 publications have been published within this topic receiving 6288 citations.


Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1997
TL;DR: Mnemohistory and the construction of Egypt suppressed history, repressed memory - Moses and Akhenaten before the law - John Spencer as Egyptologist the Moses discourse in the 18th century Sigmund Freud - the return of the repressed conceiving the One in ancient Egyptian traditions abolishing the Mosaic distinction - relgious antagonism and its overcoming as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Mnemohistory and the construction of Egypt suppressed history, repressed memory - Moses and Akhenaten before the law - John Spencer as Egyptologist the Moses discourse in the 18th century Sigmund Freud - the return of the repressed conceiving the One in ancient Egyptian traditions abolishing the Mosaic distinction - relgious antagonism and its overcoming.

331 citations

Book
28 Oct 1983
TL;DR: The rise of Egyptian civilization as mentioned in this paper has been studied extensively in the literature, including the early stages of the New Kingdom of Egypt, the Middle Kingdom, and the Third Intermediate Period (3rd Intermediate Period).
Abstract: List of figures Preface 1. The rise of Egyptian civilization B. G. Trigger 2. Old kingdom, middle kingdom and second intermediate period c. 2686-1552 BC Barry J. Kemp 3. New kingdom and third intermediate period, 1552-664 BC David O'Connor 4. The late period, 664-323 BC Alan B. Lloyd Bibliographical essays Bibliography Index.

174 citations

Book
11 Jan 2008
TL;DR: Colla draws on medieval and modern Arabic poetry, novels, and travel accounts; British and French travel writing; history of archaeology; and the history of European and Egyptian museums and exhibits.
Abstract: Conflicted Antiquities is a rich cultural history of European and Egyptian interest in ancient Egypt and its material culture, from the early nineteenth century until the mid-twentieth Consulting the relevant Arabic archives, Elliott Colla demonstrates that the emergence of Egyptology—the study of ancient Egypt and its material legacy—was as consequential for modern Egyptians as it was for Europeans The values and practices introduced by the new science of archaeology played a key role in the formation of a new colonial regime in Egypt This fact was not lost on Egyptian nationalists, who challenged colonial archaeologists with the claim that they were the direct heirs of the Pharaohs, and therefore the rightful owners and administrators of ancient Egypt’s historical sites and artifacts As this dispute developed, nationalists invented the political and expressive culture of “Pharaonism”—Egypt’s response to Europe’s Egyptomania In the process, a significant body of modern, Pharaonist poetry, sculpture, architecture, and film was created by artists and authors who looked to the ancient past for inspiration Colla draws on medieval and modern Arabic poetry, novels, and travel accounts; British and French travel writing; the history of archaeology; and the history of European and Egyptian museums and exhibits The struggle over the ownership of Pharaonic Egypt did not simply pit Egyptian nationalists against European colonial administrators Egyptian elites found arguments about the appreciation and preservation of ancient objects useful for exerting new forms of control over rural populations and for mobilizing new political parties Finally, just as the political and expressive culture of Pharaonism proved critical to the formation of new concepts of nationalist identity, it also fueled Islamist opposition to the Egyptian state

142 citations

BookDOI
01 Oct 1995
TL;DR: In this article, a series of provocative essays that explore expressions of magic and ritual power in the ancient world are presented, focusing on Egyptian and early Greek conceptions of magic as a more neutral category of inclusion.
Abstract: This volume contains a series of provocative essays that explore expressions of magic and ritual power in the ancient world. The essays are authored by leading scholars in the fields of Egyptology, ancient Near Eastern studies, the Hebrew Bible, Judaica, classical Greek and Roman studies, early Christianity and patristics, and Coptology. Throughout the book the essays examine the terms employed in descriptions of ancient magic. From this examination comes a clarification of magic as a polemical term of exclusion but also an understanding of the classical Egyptian and early Greek conceptions of magic as a more neutral category of inclusion. This book should prove to be foundational for future scholarly studies of ancient magic and ritual power. This publication has also been published in hardback (no longer available).

121 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202329
202254
20218
202028
201915
201824