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Elastic recoil detection

About: Elastic recoil detection is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 2226 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 38257 citation(s).

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Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.NIMB.2009.09.020
Abstract: The importance of 10 Be in different applications of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is well-known. In this context the half-life of 10 Be has a crucial impact, and an accurate and precise determination of the half-life is a prerequisite for many of the applications of 10 Be in cosmic-ray and earth science research. Recently, the value of the 10 Be half-life has been the centre of much debate. In order to overcome uncertainties inherent in previous determinations, we introduced a new method of high accuracy and precision. An aliquot of our highly enriched 10 Be master solution was serially diluted with increasing well-known masses of 9 Be. We then determined the initial 10 Be concentration by least square fit to the series of measurements of the resultant 10 Be/ 9 Be ratio. In order to minimize uncertainties because of mass bias which plague other low-energy mass spectrometric methods, we used for the first time Heavy-Ion Elastic Recoil Detection (HI-ERD) for the determination of the 10 Be/ 9 Be isotopic ratios, a technique which does not suffer from difficult to control mass fractionation. The specific activity of the master solution was measured by means of accurate liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The resultant combination of the 10 Be concentration and activity yields a 10 Be half-life of T 1/2 = 1.388 ± 0.018 (1 s, 1.30%) Ma. In a parallel but independent study (Chmeleff et al. [11] ), found a value of 1.386 ± 0.016 (1.15%) Ma. Our recommended weighted mean and mean standard error for the new value for 10 Be half-life based on these two independent measurements is 1.387 ± 0.012 (0.87%) Ma.

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685 Citations


Proceedings ArticleDOI: 10.1063/1.59188
M. Mayer1Institutions (1)
10 Jun 1999-
Abstract: SIMNRA is a Microsoft Windows 95/Windows NT program with fully graphical user interface for the simulation of non-Rutherford backscattering, nuclear reaction analysis and elastic recoil detection analysis with MeV ions. About 300 different non-Rutherford and nuclear reactions cross-sections are included. SIMNRA can calculate any ion-target combination including incident heavy ions and any geometry including transmission geometry. Arbitrary multi-layered foils in front of the detector can be used. Energy loss straggling includes the corrections by Chu to Bohr’s straggling theory, propagation of straggling in thick layers, geometrical straggling and straggling due to multiple small angle scattering. The effects of plural large angle scattering can be calculated approximately. Typical computing times are in the range of several seconds.

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Topics: Elastic recoil detection (51%)

680 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1063/1.363541
Ulrich Kroll1, Johannes Meier1, Arvind Shah1, S. Mikhailov  +1 moreInstitutions (1)
Abstract: Hydrogen incorporation in silicon layers prepared by plasma‐enhanced chemical‐vapor deposition using silane dilution by hydrogen has been studied by infrared spectroscopy (IR) and elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). The large range of silane dilution investigated can be divided into an amorphous and a microcrystalline zone. These two zones are separated by a narrow transition zone at a dilution level of 7.5%; here, the structure of the material cannot be clearly identified. The films in/near the amorphous/microcrystalline transition zone show a considerably enhanced hydrogen incorporation. Moreover, comparison of IR and ERDA and film stress measurements suggests that these layers contain a substantial amount of molecular hydrogen probably trapped in microvoids. In this particular case the determination of the total H content by IR spectroscopy leads to substantial errors. At silane concentrations below 6%, the hydrogen content decreases sharply and the material becomes progressively microcrystalline...

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  • FIG. 2. Hydrogencontentof the films determinedby IR spectroscopyand by ERDA asa functionof thesilaneconcentration;thegrayhighlightedarea representsthe amorphous/microcrystallinetransition zone. The lines are
    FIG. 2. Hydrogencontentof the films determinedby IR spectroscopyand by ERDA asa functionof thesilaneconcentration;thegrayhighlightedarea representsthe amorphous/microcrystallinetransition zone. The lines are
  • FIG. 1. IR-absorptionspectraof layerspreparedat different silanedilution
    FIG. 1. IR-absorptionspectraof layerspreparedat different silanedilution
  • FIG. 4. Compressivefilm stressas a function of the silaneconcentration. The line is merely for guiding the eye.
    FIG. 4. Compressivefilm stressas a function of the silaneconcentration. The line is merely for guiding the eye.
  • FIG. 3. Hydrogencontentdeterminedby ERDA plottedagainstthe hydrogencontentobtainedby IR spectroscopy;the squaresaresamplesprepared in themc-Si:H regimehavinga clearmicrocrystallinecharacterwhereasthe gray highlightedcircle representsthe films depositedin or very nearto the amorphous/microcrystallinetransition zone. Furthermore, conventional a-Si:H samples~black points! depositedin our laboratoryfrom puresilane at different temperatures~100, 300, and400°C! and/orusing the hot-wire techniqueare added,for the purposesof comparison.The straight line is fitted by hand.
    FIG. 3. Hydrogencontentdeterminedby ERDA plottedagainstthe hydrogencontentobtainedby IR spectroscopy;the squaresaresamplesprepared in themc-Si:H regimehavinga clearmicrocrystallinecharacterwhereasthe gray highlightedcircle representsthe films depositedin or very nearto the amorphous/microcrystallinetransition zone. Furthermore, conventional a-Si:H samples~black points! depositedin our laboratoryfrom puresilane at different temperatures~100, 300, and400°C! and/orusing the hot-wire techniqueare added,for the purposesof comparison.The straight line is fitted by hand.
Topics: Microcrystalline (61%), Silane (58%), Hydrogen (56%) ...read more

289 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1116/1.588793
Abstract: We present results on the thermal stability as well as the thermally induced hydrogen, hydrocarbon, and nitrogen–hydrogen effusion from thin films of Group III nitrides prepared by low‐pressure chemical vapor deposition from organometallic precursors. We have deposited amorphous, polycrystalline, and epitaxial InN, GaN, and AIN films on (0001) Al2O3 substrates using the chemical reaction of azido[bis(3‐dimethylamino)propyl]indium, triethylgallium, and tritertiarybutylaluminium with ammonia. The substrate temperature was varied between 400 °C and 1100 °C. The elemental composition, in particular its dependence on the growth temperature, was investigated by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). The influence of growth rate and crystallite size on the concentration of surface adsorbed hydrocarbons and carbon oxides is determined by a combination of ERDA and thermal desorption measurements. In addition, the stability of and the nitrogen flux from the InN, GaN, and AIN surfaces was determined by x‐ray diffraction and thermal decomposition experiments.

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Topics: Chemical vapor deposition (59%), Thermal desorption (56%), Thin film (56%) ...read more

265 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1063/1.119949
Abstract: AlxGa1−xN alloys were grown on c-plane sapphire by plasma-induced molecular beam epitaxy. The Al content x was varied over the whole composition range (0⩽x⩽1). The molar Al fraction was deduced from x-ray diffraction and for comparison by elastic recoil detection analysis. The composition of the alloys calculated from the lattice parameter c underestimates x. This is due to a deformation of the unit cell. The exact Al mole fraction and the biaxial strain of the alloys can be calculated by an additional determination of a, using asymmetric reflections. The results obtained by x-ray diffraction and elastic recoil detection provide evidence for the validity of Vegard’s law in the AlGaN system. In addition, the deviation of the band gap from a linear dependence on x was investigated. We found a downward bowing with a bowing parameter b=1.3 eV.

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Topics: Elastic recoil detection (56%), Mole fraction (56%), Lattice constant (53%) ...read more

262 Citations


Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202128
202032
201956
201838
201752
201647

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Topic's top 5 most impactful authors

Timo Sajavaara

59 papers, 1.5K citations

Andreas Bergmaier

43 papers, 2.1K citations

Günther Dollinger

41 papers, 2.2K citations

Markku Leskelä

38 papers, 2K citations

Mikko Ritala

36 papers, 1.8K citations

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