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Electron beam physical vapor deposition

About: Electron beam physical vapor deposition is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 7013 publications have been published within this topic receiving 108073 citations.


Papers
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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Optical, microscopic and electrical measurements suggest that the synthetic process leads to the growth of MoS(2) monolayer, and TEM images verify that the synthesized MoS (2) sheets are highly crystalline.
Abstract: Large-area MoS(2) atomic layers are synthesized on SiO(2) substrates by chemical vapor deposition using MoO(3) and S powders as the reactants. Optical, microscopic and electrical measurements suggest that the synthetic process leads to the growth of MoS(2) monolayer. The TEM images verify that the synthesized MoS(2) sheets are highly crystalline.

3,088 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors reviewed work on In2O3:Sn films prepared by reactive e−beam evaporation of In2 O3 with up to 9 mol'% SnO2 onto heated glass.
Abstract: We review work on In2O3:Sn films prepared by reactive e‐beam evaporation of In2O3 with up to 9 mol % SnO2 onto heated glass. These films have excellent spectrally selective properties when the deposition rate is ∼0.2 nm/s, the substrate temperature is ≳150 °C, and the oxygen pressure is ∼5×10−4 Torr. Optimized coatings have crystallite dimensions ≳50 nm and a C‐type rare‐earth oxide structure. We cover electromagnetic properties as recorded by spectrophotometry in the 0.2–50‐μm range, by X‐band microwave reflectance, and by dc electrical measurements. Hall‐effect data are included. An increase of the Sn content is shown to have several important effects: the semiconductor band gap is shifted towards the ultraviolet, the luminous transmittance remains high, the infrared reflectance increases to a high value beyond a certain wavelength which shifts towards the visible, phonon‐induced infrared absorption bands vanish, the microwave reflectance goes up, and the dc resisitivity drops to ∼2×10−4 Ω cm. The corre...

2,124 citations

Book
11 Jan 1979
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the formation of Inorganic Films by Remote Plasma-Enhanced Chemical-Vapor Deposition (PLVD) and its application in solvent-gel coatings.
Abstract: J.L. Vossen and W. Kern, Introduction. S.M. Rossnagel, Glow Discharge Plasma and Sources for Etching and Deposition. C.V. Deshpandey and R.F. Bunshah, Evaporation Processes. P.P. Chow, Molecular Beam Epitaxy. R. Parsons, Sputter Deposition Processes. P.C. Johnson, The Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition of Thin Films. K.F. Jensen and W. Kern, Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition. K.F. Jensen and T. Kuech, Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition. J.G. Eden, Photochemical Vapor Deposition. L.C. Klein, Sol-Gel Coatings. R. Reif and W. Kern, Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition. G. Lucovsky, D.V. Tsu, R.A. Rudder, and R.J. Markunas, Formation of Inorganic Films by Remote Plasma-Enhanced Chemical-Vapor Deposition. T.M. Mayer and S.D. Allen, Selected Area Processing. H.W. Lehman, Plasma-Assisted Etching. P.R. Puckett, S.L. Michel, and W.E. Hughes, Ion Beam Etching. C.I.H. Ashby, Laser-Driven Etching.

1,250 citations

Book
01 May 1994
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present thin film technology, thin film characterisation, and high energy techniques for thin film. But they do not discuss the effects of these technologies on the performance of the film.
Abstract: Thin Film Technology. Gas Kinetics. Vacuum Technology. Evaporation. Deposition. Epitaxy. Chemical Vapor Deposition. High-Energy Techniques. Plasma Processes. Film Characterization.

736 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors outline the fundamental physics involved and go on to discuss recent experimental findings of pulsed laser deposition, as an alternative to chemical vapor deposition or molecular beam epitaxy.
Abstract: Photons have many advantages for vaporizing condensed systems, and laser vaporization sources have a flexibility not available with other methods. These sources are applied to making thin films in the well-known technique of pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The vaporized material may be further processed through a pulsed secondary gas, lending the source additional degrees of freedom. Such pulsed-gas sources have long been exploited for fundamental studies, and they are very promising for film deposition, as an alternative to chemical vapor deposition or molecular beam epitaxy. The authors outline the fundamental physics involved and go on to discuss recent experimental findings.

722 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202335
202288
2021111
2020125
2019154
2018149