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Electronic literature

About: Electronic literature is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 297 publications have been published within this topic receiving 2844 citations. The topic is also known as: digital literature.


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Book
01 Mar 2004
TL;DR: The editors of First Person have gathered a remarkably diverse group of new media theorists and practitioners to consider the relationship between "story" and "game," as well as the new kinds of artistic creation that have become possible in the digital environment.
Abstract: Electronic games have established a huge international market, significantly outselling non-digital games; people spend more money on The Sims than on "Monopoly" or even on "Magic: the Gathering." Yet it is widely believed that the market for electronic literature -- predicted by some to be the future of the written word -- languishes. Even bestselling author Stephen King achieved disappointing results with his online publication of "Riding the Bullet" and "The Plant." Isn't it possible, though, that many hugely successful computer games -- those that depend on or at least utilize storytelling conventions of narrative, character, and theme -- can be seen as examples of electronic literature? And isn't it likely that the truly significant new forms of electronic literature will prove to be (like games) so deeply interactive and procedural that it would be impossible to present them as paper-like "e-books"? The editors of First Person have gathered a remarkably diverse group of new media theorists and practitioners to consider the relationship between "story" and "game," as well as the new kinds of artistic creation (literary, performative, playful) that have become possible in the digital environment. This landmark collection is organized as a series of discussions among creators and theorists; each section includes three presentations, with each presentation followed by two responses. Topics considered range from "Cyberdrama" to "Ludology" (the study of games), to "The Pixel/The Line" to "Beyond Chat." The conversational structure inspired contributors to revise, update, and expand their presentations as they prepared them for the book, and the panel discussions have overflowed into a First Person web site (created in conjunction with the online journal Electronic Book Review).

546 citations

Book
07 Dec 2007
TL;DR: Mechanisms is the first book in its field to devote significant attention to storage--the hard drive in particular--arguing that understanding the affordances of storage devices is essential to understanding new media.
Abstract: In Mechanisms, Matthew Kirschenbaum examines new media and electronic writing against the textual and technological primitives that govern writing, inscription, and textual transmission in all media: erasure, variability, repeatability, and survivability. Mechanisms is the first book in its field to devote significant attention to storage--the hard drive in particular--arguing that understanding the affordances of storage devices is essential to understanding new media. Drawing a distinction between "forensic materiality" and "formal materiality," Kirschenbaum uses applied computer forensics techniques in his study of new media works. Just as the humanities discipline of textual studies examines books as physical objects and traces different variants of texts, computer forensics encourage us to perceive new media in terms of specific versions, platforms, systems, and devices. Kirschenbaum demonstrates these techniques in media-specific readings of three landmark works of new media and electronic literature, all from the formative era of personal computing: the interactive fiction game Mystery House, Michael Joyce's Afternoon: A Story, and William Gibson's electronic poem "Agrippa." Drawing on newly available archival resources for these works, Kirschenbaum uses a hex editor and disk image of Mystery House to conduct a "forensic walkthrough" to explore critical reading strategies linked to technical praxis; examines the multiple versions and revisions of Afternoon in order to address the diachronic dimension of electronic textuality; and documents the volatile publication and transmission history of "Agrippa" as an illustration of the social aspect of transmission and preservation.

374 citations

Book
01 Mar 2008
TL;DR: The Electronic Literature Collection, Volume 1 as mentioned in this paper is a collection of sixty new and recent works of electronic literature with keyword index, authors' notes, and editorial headnotes, along with a website offering resources for teachers and students.
Abstract: A visible presence for some two decades, electronic literature has already produced many works that deserve the rigorous scrutiny critics have long practiced with print literature. Only now, however, with "Electronic Literature" by N. Katherine Hayles, do we have the first systematic survey of the field and an analysis of its importance, breadth, and wide-ranging implications for literary study.Hayles' book is designed to help electronic literature move into the classroom. Her systematic survey of the field addresses its major genres, the challenges it poses to traditional literary theory, and the complex and compelling issues at stake. She develops a theoretical framework for understanding how electronic literature both draws on the print tradition and requires new reading and interpretive strategies. Grounding her approach in the evolutionary dynamic between humans and technology, Hayles argues that neither the body nor the machine should be given absolute theoretical priority. Rather, she focuses on the interconnections between embodied writers and users and the intelligent machines that perform electronic texts.Through close readings of important works, Hayles demonstrates that a new mode of narration is emerging that differs significantly from previous models. Key to her argument is the observation that almost all contemporary literature has its genesis as electronic files, so that print becomes a specific mode for electronic text rather than an entirely different medium. Hayles illustrates the implications of this condition with three contemporary novels that bear the mark of the digital.Included with the book is a CD, "The Electronic Literature Collection, Volume 1", containing sixty new and recent works of electronic literature with keyword index, authors' notes, and editorial headnotes. Representing multiple modalities of electronic writing - hypertext fiction, kinetic poetry, generative and combinatory forms, network writing, codework, 3D, narrative animations, installation pieces, and Flash poetry - the ELC 1 encompasses comparatively low-tech work alongside heavily coded pieces. Complementing the text and the CD-ROM is a website offering resources for teachers and students, including sample syllabi, original essays, author biographies, and useful links. Together, the three elements provide an exceptional pedagogical opportunity.

282 citations

Book
01 Jan 2003
TL;DR: The first book-length consideration of interactive fiction from both computational and literary perspectives is the Twisty Little Passages by Montfort as mentioned in this paper, where he examined it from both game and literature perspectives.
Abstract: From the Publisher: Interactive fiction--the best-known form of which is the text game or text adventure--has not received as much critical attention as have such other forms of electronic literature as hypertext fiction and the conversational programs known as chatterbots Twisty Little Passages (the title refers to a maze in Adventure, the first interactive fiction) is the first book-length consideration of this form, examining it from gaming and literary perspectives Nick Montfort, an interactive fiction author himself, offers both aficionados and first-time users a way to approach interactive fiction that will lead to a more pleasurable and meaningful experience of it Twisty Little Passages looks at interactive fiction beginning with its most important literary ancestor, the riddle Montfort then discusses Adventure and its precursors (including the I Ching and Dungeons and Dragons), and follows this with an examination of mainframe text games developed in response, focusing on the most influential work of that era, Zork He then considers the introduction of commercial interactive fiction for home computers, particularly that produced by Infocom Commercial works inspired an independent reaction, and Montfort describes the emergence of independent creators and the development of an online interactive fiction community in the 1990s Finally, he considers the influence of interactive fiction on other literary and gaming forms With Twisty Little Passages Nick Montfort places interactive fiction in its computational and literary contexts, opening up this still-developing form to new consideration

240 citations

Book
10 Mar 2010
TL;DR: The Possible Worlds of Hypertext Fiction provides a systematic and replicable analytical method that can be used by other analysts and offers a comprehensive and timely body of hypertext fiction criticism as well as an elucidation and critique of Possible Worlds Theory.
Abstract: The Possible Worlds of Hypertext Fiction provides an innovative and comprehensive methodology for the analysis of Storyspace hypertext fiction. The book begins by examining the development of hypertext theory from the enthusiastic claims about the narrative capabilities that accompanied the first-wave to the analytical focus of the second. Drawing on second-wave conclusions about the self-reflexivity of the medium as well as the narrative devices that many Storyspace works contain, Bell convincingly argues that Possible Worlds Theory offers an appropriate framework with which to analyse them. Providing four comprehensive illustrative examples and an ongoing theoretical exposition, the book guides the reader through the approach while simultaneously supplementing and amending Possible Worlds Theory for its application for hypertext fiction. The book therefore provides a systematic and replicable analytical method that can be used by other analysts and offers a comprehensive and timely body of hypertext fiction criticism as well as an elucidation and critique of Possible Worlds Theory. In addition to scholars of electronic literature, including undergraduate and postgraduate students, this book should appeal to researchers working in the areas of narrative theory and stylistics.

64 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20221
20219
202018
201933
201821
201727