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Topic

Emotional intelligence

About: Emotional intelligence is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 18082 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 393093 citation(s). The topic is also known as: EI & Emotional Intelligence Quotient、 EQ.


Papers
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Book
01 Jan 1995
Abstract: Is IQ destiny? Perhaps not nearly as much as humans think. This text argues that our view of human intelligence is far too narrow, ignoring a crucial range of abilities that matter immensely in terms of how we do in life. Drawing on brain and behavioural research, the author shows the factors at work when people of high IQ flounder and those of modest IQ do surprisingly well. These factors add up to a different way of succeeding in life - one the author terms "emotional intelligence". Emotional intelligence includes self-awareness and impulse control, persistence, zeal and self-motivation, empathy and social deftness. These are the qualities that mark people that excel. They are also the hallmarks of character and self-discipline, of altruism and compassion. As Goleman demonstrates, the personal costs of deficits in emotional intelligence can range from problems in marriage and poor physical health in adults to eating disorders and depression in children. But the news is hopeful. Emotional intelligence is not fixed at birth. Goleman's argument gives insights into the brain architecture underlying emotion and rationality. He shows how emotional intelligence can be nurtured and strengthened in all of us. Since the emotional lessons a child learns actually sculpt the brain's circuitry, Goleman provides detailed guidance as to how parents and schools can benefit from this.

6,281 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Findings from a meta-analysis of 213 school-based, universal social and emotional learning programs involving 270,034 kindergarten through high school students suggest that policy makers, educators, and the public can contribute to healthy development of children by supporting the incorporation of evidence-based SEL programming into standard educational practice.
Abstract: This article presents findings from a meta-analysis of 213 school-based, universal social and emotional learning (SEL) programs involving 270,034 kindergarten through high school students. Compared to controls, SEL participants demonstrated significantly improved social and emotional skills, attitudes, behavior, and academic performance that reflected an 11-percentile-point gain in achievement. School teaching staff successfully conducted SEL programs. The use of 4 recommended practices for developing skills and the presence of implementation problems moderated program outcomes. The findings add to the growing empirical evidence regarding the positive impact of SEL programs. Policy makers, educators, and the public can contribute to healthy development of children by supporting the incorporation of evidence-based SEL programming into standard educational practice.

4,837 citations

Book
01 Jan 1998
Abstract: In Working with Emotional Intelligence,Goleman reveals the skills that distinguish star performers in every field, form entry-level jobs to top executive positions. He shows that the single most important factor is not IQ, advanced degrees, or technical expertise, but the quality Goleman calls emotional intelligence. self-awareness, self-confidence, and self-control; commitment and integrity; the ability to communicate and influence, to initiate and accept change--these competencies are at a premium in today's job market.

4,820 citations

01 Jan 1997

3,808 citations

Book
01 Nov 2004
Abstract: What happens in our brains to make us feel fear, love, hate, anger, joy? do we control our emotions, or do they control us? Do animals have emotions? How can traumatic experiences in early childhood influence adult behavior, even though we have no conscious memory of them? In The Emotional Brain, Joseph LeDoux investigates the origins of human emotions and explains that many exist as part of complex neural systems that evolved to enable us to survive. Unlike conscious feelings, emotions originate in the brain at a much deeper level, says LeDoux, a leading authority in the field of neural science and one of the principal researchers profiled in Daniel Goleman's Emotional Intelligence. In this provocative book, LeDoux explores the underlying brain mechanisms responsible for our emotions, mechanisms that are only now being revealed. The Emotional Brain presents some fascinating findings about our familiar yet little understood emotions. For example, our brains can detect danger before we even experience the feeling of being afraid. The brain also begins to initiate physical responses (heart palpitations, sweaty palms, muscle tension) before we become aware of an associated feeling of fear. Conscious feelings, says LeDoux, are somewhat irrelevant to the way the emotional brain works. He points out that emotional responses are hard-wired into the brain's circuitry, but the things that make us emotional are learned through experience. And this may be the key to understanding, even changing, our emotional makeup. Many common psychiatric problems - such as phobias or posttraumatic stress disorder - involve malfunctions in the way emotion systems learn and remember. Understanding how thesemechanisms normally work will have important consequences for how we view ourselves and how we treat emotional disorders.

3,624 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202220
20211,070
20201,384
20191,347
20181,265
20171,257