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Topic

Enterprise software

About: Enterprise software is a(n) research topic. Over the lifetime, 8400 publication(s) have been published within this topic receiving 125857 citation(s). The topic is also known as: Enterprise Application Software & EAS.


Papers
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Proceedings Article
01 Jan 1995
TL;DR: The goal of the TOVE (TOronto Virtual Enterprise) Enterprise Modelling project is to create the next generation Enterprise Model, a Common Sense Enterprise Model that has the ability to deduce answers to queries that require relatively shallow knowledge of the domain.
Abstract: As information systems play a more active role in the management and operations of an enterprise, the demands on these systems have also increased. Departing from their traditional role as simple repositories of data, information systems must now provide more sophisticated support to manual and automated decision making; they must not only answer queries with what is explicitly represented in their Enterprise Model, but must be able to answer queries with what is implied by the model. The goal of the TOVE (TOronto Virtual Enterprise) Enterprise Modelling project is to create the next generation Enterprise Model, a Common Sense Enterprise Model. By common sense we mean that an Enterprise Model has the ability to deduce answers to queries that require relatively shallow knowledge of the domain. We are taking what can be viewed as a `second generation knowledge engineering' approach to constructing our Common Sense Enterprise Model. Rather than extracting rules from experts, we are `engineering ontologies.' An ontology is a formal description of entities and their properties, relationships, constraints, behaviours. Through interaction with our industrial partners, we encounter problems that arise in their particular enterprises. Our approach to engineering ontologies begins with using these problems to de ne an ontology's requirements in the form of questions that an ontology must be able to answer. We call this the competency of the ontology. The second step is to de ne the terminology of the ontology its objects, attributes, and relations. In this way the ontology provides the language that will be used to express the de nitions in the terminology and the constraints required by the application. The third step is to specify the de nitions and constraints on the terminology, where possible. The speci cations are represented in First Order Logic and implemented in Prolog. Lastly, we test the competency of the ontology by proving completeness theorems with respect to the competency questions. Our initial e orts have focused on ontologies to support reasoning in industrial environments. The tasks that we have targeted to support are in `supply chain management' which extends MRP (Manufacturing Requirements Planning) to include logistics/distribution [Fox

1,476 citations

01 Jan 2000
Abstract: 173 For some 20 years after John Dearden wrote these words, history proved him right. Today, however, there is a booming market for software packages claiming to provide a total, integrated solution to companies’ information-processing needs. Even companies that choose not to adopt such packages are pursuing aggressive strategies of systems integration by redeveloping custom software and adopting technologies such as data warehousing. Integrated enterprise systems deserve serious research attention because of their great potential for financial, technical, managerial, human, and strategic benefits, costs, and risks. This chapter provides a theoretical framework for analyzing, both retrospectively and prospectively, the business value of enterprise systems. We first describe the historical context in which enterprise systems emerged. Next we identify the key characteristics of enterprise systems, discuss the reasons companies do and do not adopt them, and summarize arguments about why enterprise systems are an important topic for research. We then analyze enterprise systems in terms of the concept of success. We argue that the many facets of success create difficulties for

1,327 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Enterprise Ontology was developed within the Enterprise Project, a collaborative effort to provide a framework for enterprise modelling, and was built to serve as a basis for this framework which includes methods and a computer tool set for enterprise modeling.
Abstract: This is a comprehensive description of the Enterprise Ontology, a collection of terms and definitions relevant to business enterprises. We state its intended purposes, describe how we went about building it, define all the terms and describe our experiences in converting these into formal definitions. We then describe how we used the Enterprise Ontology and give an evaluation which compares the actual uses with original purposes. We conclude by summarising what we have learned. The Enterprise Ontology was developed within the Enterprise Project, a collaborative effort to provide a framework for enterprise modelling. The ontology was built to serve as a basis for this framework which includes methods and a computer tool set for enterprise modelling. We give an overview of the Enterprise Project, elaborate on the intended use of the ontology, and give a brief overview of the process we went through to build it. The scope of the Enterprise Ontology covers those core concepts required for the project, which will appeal to a wider audience. We present natural language definitions for all the terms, starting with the foundational concepts (e.g. entity, relationship, actor). These are used to define the main body of terms, which are divided into the following subject areas: activities, organisation, strategy and marketing. We review some of the things learned during the formalisation process of converting the natural language definitions into Ontolingua. We identify and propose solutions for what may be general problems occurring in the development of a wide range of ontologies in other domains. We then characterise in general terms the sorts of issues that will be faced when converting an informal ontology into a formal one. Finally, we describe our experiences in using the Enterprise Ontology. We compare these with the intended uses, noting our successes and failures. We conclude with an overall evaluation and summary of what we have learned.

1,061 citations

Journal Article
Abstract: Veblen has been claimed and rejected both by sociologists and economists as being one of theirs. He enriched and attacked both disciplines, as he did so many others: philosophy, history, social psychology, politics, and linguistics. Because he took all knowledge as necessary and relevant to adequate understanding, Veblen was a holistic analyst of the social process. First published in 1904, this classic analysis of the U.S. economy has enduring value today. In it, Veblen posited a theory of business fluctuations and economic growth which included chronic depression and inflation. He predicted the socioeconomic changes that would occur as a result: militarism, imperialism, fascism, consumerism, and the development of the mass media as well as the corporate bureaucracy. Douglas Dowd's introduction places the volume within the traditions of both macroeconomics and microeconomics, tracing Veblen's place among social thinkers, and the place of this volume in the body of his work.

1,047 citations

Book
01 Jan 1980

994 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
20221
202124
202031
201948
201864
2017286