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Epithelial dysplasia

About: Epithelial dysplasia is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 1608 publications have been published within this topic receiving 43073 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A classification system for the epithelial changes that occur in ulcerative colitis was developed, which should be applicable to other forms of inflammatory bowel disease as well and makes use of standardized terminology, addresses specific problem areas, and offers practical solutions.

1,730 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Feb 1984-Cancer
TL;DR: This study confirms that oral leukoplakia is a precancerous lesion and that certain characteristics indicate greater risks and warrant consideration of more aggressive management.
Abstract: Two hundred fifty-seven patients with oral leukoplakia were studied and followed for an average period of 7.2 years. All lesions were more than one cm in size and had been present and observed for a minimum of 6 months. Of the initial biopsies, 235 revealed a benign hyperkeratosis and 22 others contained some degree of epithelial dysplasia. Seventy-three percent of the patients used tobacco, with cigarette usage being the predominant form. Forty-five patients (17.5%) subsequently developed squamous carcinomas in the hyperkeratotic epithelial site in an average time of 8.1 years. Eight of these malignant transformations came from patients who originally had epithelial dysplasia. High risks for malignant transformation also included non-smoking patients, the clinical presence of erythroplasia (erythroleukoplakia), and a clinical verrucous-papillary hyperkeratotic pattern. Duration of the leukoplakia progressively increased the total number of malignant transformations, with the largest rate occurring in the second year. This study confirms that oral leukoplakia is a precancerous lesion and that certain characteristics indicate greater risks and warrant consideration of more aggressive management.

1,027 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Working Group considered the two class classification and was of the view that reducing the number of choices from 3 to 2 may increase the likelihood of agreement between pathologists, and the utility of this need to be tested in future studies.
Abstract: At a workshop coordinated by the WHO Collaborating Centre for Oral Cancer and Precancer in the United Kingdom issues related to potentially malignant disorders of the oral cavity were discussed by an expert group. The consensus views of the Working Group are presented in a series of papers. In this report, we review the oral epithelial dysplasia classification systems. The three classification schemes [oral epithelial dysplasia scoring system, squamous intraepithelial neoplasia and Ljubljana classification] were presented and the Working Group recommended epithelial dysplasia grading for routine use. Although most oral pathologists possibly recognize and accept the criteria for grading epithelial dysplasia, firstly based on architectural features and then of cytology, there is great variability in their interpretation of the presence, degree and significance of the individual criteria. Several studies have shown great interexaminer and intraexaminer variability in the assessment of the presence or absence and the grade of oral epithelial dysplasia. The Working Group considered the two class classification (no/questionable/ mild - low risk; moderate or severe - implying high risk) and was of the view that reducing the number of choices from 3 to 2 may increase the likelihood of agreement between pathologists. The utility of this need to be tested in future studies. The variables that are likely to affect oral epithelial dysplasia scoring were discussed and are outlined here; these need to be researched in longitudinal studies to explore the biological significance of a low-risk or high-risk dysplasia.

554 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A substantial need to improve the histologic assessment of epithelial dysplasia or, since epithelial Dysplasia does not seem to be invariably associated with or even a necessary prerequisite for malignant development, it may be necessary to develop other methods for predicting the malignant potential of pre-malignant lesions.
Abstract: The concept of a two-step process of cancer development in the oral mucosa, i.e., the initial presence of a precursor subsequently developing into cancer, is well-established. Oral leukoplakia is the best-known precursor lesion. The evidence that oral leukoplakias are pre-malignant is mainly derived from follow-up studies showing that between < 1 and 18% of oral pre-malignant lesions will develop into oral cancer; it has been shown that certain clinical sub-types of leukoplakia are at a higher risk for malignant transformation than others. The presence of epithelial dysplasia may be even more important in predicting malignant development than the clinical characteristics. Three major problems, however, are attached to the importance of epithelial dysplasia in predicting malignant development: (1) The diagnosis is essentially subjective, (2) it seems that not all lesions exhibiting dysplasia will eventually become malignant and some may even regress, and (3) carcinoma can develop from lesions in which epithelial dysplasia was not diagnosed in previous biopsies. There is, therefore, a substantial need to improve the histologic assessment of epithelial dysplasia or, since epithelial dysplasia does not seem to be invariably associated with or even a necessary prerequisite for malignant development, it may be necessary to develop other methods for predicting the malignant potential of pre-malignant lesions. As a consequence of these problems, numerous attempts have been made to relate biological characteristics to the malignant potential of leukoplakias. Molecular biological markers have been suggested to be of value in the diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of leukoplakias. Markers of epithelial differentiation and, more recently, genomic markers could potentially be good candidates for improving the prognostic evaluation of precursors of oral cancer. As yet, one or a panel of molecular markers has not been determined that allows for a prognostic prediction of oral pre-cancer which is any more reliable than dysplasia recording. However, these new markers could be considered complementary to conventional prognostic evaluation.

487 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The criteria for grading Dysplasia in gastric epithelium into mild, moderate, and severe grades are given, and attention is drawn to the problems of differentiating inflammatory or regenerative change from mild dysplasia and intramucosal carcinoma from severe dyspl Asia.
Abstract: A distinction can be made between a precancerous condition and a precancerous lesion. The former is a clinical state associated with a significantly increased risk of cancer, whereas a precancerous lesion is a histopathological abnormality in which cancer is more likely to occur than in its apparently normal counterpart. Up to the present time atrophic gastritis, gastric ulcer, pernicious anaemia, gastric stumps, gastric polyps, and Menetrier's disease have all been considered as precancerous conditions and lesions of the stomach. Of these, only atrophic gastritis, pernicious anaemia, gastric stumps, and certain types of gastric polyp can now be regarded as having any really significant malignant potential. The precancerous lesion common to these is epithelial dysplasia which can occur in ordinary (foveolar) gastric epithelium as well as in intestinal metaplasia. The criteria for grading dysplasia in gastric epithelium into mild, moderate, and severe grades are given, and attention is drawn to the problems of differentiating inflammatory or regenerative change from mild dysplasia and intramucosal carcinoma from severe dysplasia. The clinical and epidemiological implications of gastric dysplasia are discussed with suggestions for further research.

437 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202356
202291
202162
202078
201957
201868