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Evolutionism

About: Evolutionism is a research topic. Over the lifetime, 1197 publications have been published within this topic receiving 24886 citations. The topic is also known as: evolutionary theory & evolutionary thought.


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Book
01 Jan 1982
TL;DR: The history of biology has been extensively studied in the literature as mentioned in this paper, including the place of biology in the sciences and its conceptual structure, the nature of science and its nature of method in science, and the position of biology within the sciences.
Abstract: 1 Introduction: How to write history of biology Subjectivity and bias Why study the history of biology? 2 The place of biology in the sciences and its conceptual structure The nature of science Method in science The position of biology within the sciences How and why is biology different? Special characteristics of living organisms Reduction and biology Emergence The conceptual structure of biology A new philosophy of biology 3 The changing intellectual milieu of biology Antiquity The Christian world picture The Renaissance The discovery of diversity Biology in the Enlightenment The rise of science from the seventeenth to the nineteenth century Divisive developments in the nineteenth century Biology in the twentieth century Major periods in the history of biology Biology and philosophy Biology today PART I DIVERSITY OF LIFE 4 Macrotaxonomy, the science of classifying Aristotle The classification of plants by the ancients and the herbalists Downward classification by logical division Pre-Linnaean zoologists Carl Linnaeus Buffon A new start in animal classification Taxonomic characters Upward classification by empirical grouping Transition period (1758-1859) Hierarchical classifications 5 Grouping according to common ancestry The decline of macrotaxonomic research Numerical phenetics Cladistics The traditional or evolutionary methodology New taxonomic characters Facilitation of information retrieval The study of diversity 6 Microtaxonomy, the science of species Early species concepts The essentialist species concept The nominalistic species concept Darwin's species concept The rise of the biological species concept Applying the biological species concept to multidimensional species taxa The significance of species in biology PART II EVOLUTION 7 Origins without evolution The coming of evolutionism The French Enlightenment 8 Evolution before Darwin Lamarck Cuvier England Lyell and uniformitarianism Germany 9 Charles Darwin Darwin and evolution Alfred Russel Wallace The publication of the Origin 10 Darwin's evidence for evolution and common descent Common descent and the natural system Common descent and geographical distribution Morphology as evidence for evolution and common descent Embryology as evidence for evolution and common descent 11 The causation of evolution: natural selection The major components of the theory of natural selection The origin of the concept of natural selection The impact of the Darwinian revolution The resistance to natural selection Alternate evolutionary theories 12 Diversity and synthesis of evolutionary thought The growing split among the evolutionists Advances in evolutionary genetics Advances in evolutionary systematics The evolutionary synthesis 13 Post-synthesis developments Molecular biology Natural selection Unresolved issues in natural selection Modes of speciation Macroevolution The evolution of man Evolution in modern thought PART III VARIATION AND ITS INHERITANCE 14 Early theories and breeding experiments Theories of inheritance among the ancients Mendel's forerunners 15 Germ cells, vehicles of heredity The Schwann-Schleiden cell theory The meaning of sex and fertilization Chromosomes and their role 16 The nature of inheritance Darwin and variation August Weismann Hugo de Vries Gregor Mendel 17 The flowering of Mendelian genetics The rediscoverers of Mendel The classical period of Mendelian genetics The origin of new variation (mutation) The emergence of modern genetics The Sutton-Boveri chromosome theory Sex determination Morgan and the fly room Meiosis Morgan and the chromosome theory 18 Theories of the gene Competing theories of inheritance The Mendelian explanation of continuous variation 19 The chemical basis of inheritance The discovery of the double helix Genetics in modern thought 20 Epilogue: Toward a science of science Scientists and the scientific milieu The maturation of theories and concepts Impediments to the maturation of theories and concepts The sciences and the external milieu Progress in science Notes References Glossary Index

2,171 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
28 Jan 2011-Science
TL;DR: Only an extensive research effort involving multiple experimental approaches—particularly long-term field experiments—over a variety of ecological communities will provide the answer to the importance of the evolution-to-ecology pathway across systems.
Abstract: The effect of ecological change on evolution has long been a focus of scientific research. The reverse—how evolutionary dynamics affect ecological traits—has only recently captured our attention, however, with the realization that evolution can occur over ecological time scales. This newly highlighted causal direction and the implied feedback loop—eco-evolutionary dynamics—is invigorating both ecologists and evolutionists and blurring the distinction between them. Despite some recent relevant studies, the importance of the evolution-to-ecology pathway across systems is still unknown. Only an extensive research effort involving multiple experimental approaches—particularly long-term field experiments—over a variety of ecological communities will provide the answer.

914 citations

Book
01 Jan 2001
TL;DR: What Evolution Is poses the questions at the heart of evolutionary theory and considers how the authors' improved understanding of evolution has affected the viewpoints and values of modern man.
Abstract: Mayr provides as convincing a testament to Darwin's genius as you are likely to find."--New York Times Book Review. At once a spirited defense of Darwinian explanations of biology and an elegant primer on evolution for the general reader, What Evolution Is poses the questions at the heart of evolutionary theory and considers how our improved understanding of evolution has affected the viewpoints and values of modern man.Science Masters Series

737 citations

Book
01 Jan 1984
TL;DR: The Idea of Evolution: Its Scope and Implications and the Old Worldview and the New The Possibilities of Change The Nature of Science The Historian's Problems.
Abstract: List of Illustrations Preface to the Third Edition Preface to the First Edition 1 The Idea of Evolution: Its Scope and Implications The Old Worldview and the New The Possibilities of Change The Nature of Science The Historian's Problems 2 The Pre-evolutionary Worldview Human History Theories of the Earth The Meaning of Fossils Natural Theology The New Natural History The Problem of Generation 3 Evolution in the Enlightenment Human Nature The Origin of Society The History of the Earth The Chain of Being The New Classification The New Theories of Generation The Materialists The First Transmutationists 4 Nature and Society, 1800-1859 The Invention of Progress The Framework of Science Georges Cuvier: Fossils and the History of Life Catastrophism and Natural Theology in Britain The Philosophical Naturalists Radical Science The Principle of Uniformity The Vestiges of Creation 5 The Development of Darwin's Theory Darwin's Early Career The Crucial Years: 1836-1839 Development of the Theory, 1840-1859 Wallace and Publication of the Theory 6 The Reception of Darwin's Theory The Foundations of Darwinism The Scientific Debate Darwinism and Design Human Origins Evolution and Progress 7 The Eclipse of Darwinism: Scientific Evolutionism, 1875-1925 Reconstructing the History of Life The Age of the Earth Neo-Lamarckism Orthogenesis Neo-Darwinism Mendelism and the Mutation Theory 8 Evolution, Society, and Culture, 1875-1925 The Missing Link The Origins of Culture and Society Evolution and Race Social Evolutionism Biological Determinism Neo-Lamarckism and Society Evolution and Philosophy Evolution and Religion 9 The Evolutionary Synthesis Population Genetics The Modern Synthesis The Origin of Life Wider Implications of the Synthesis 10 Modern Debates and Developments The History of Life Human Origins Sociobiology and Ultra-Darwinism Opponents of Ultra-Darwinism Anti-Darwinians Darwinism not Scientific? Creationism Bibliography Index

649 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The anthropological study of technology and material culture is poised, finally, for a comeback, if in a different guise as discussed by the authors, and its findings may signifi cantly alter the way anthropologists analyze everyday life, cultural reproduc- tion, and human evolution.
Abstract: At the onset of the 20th century, anthropologists such as Balfour, Marett, and Haddon could readily identify three spheres of strength in anthropological research: material culture, social organization, and physical anthropology (49). The study of technology and material culture, however, was about to be jettisoned, and with stunning finality. By 1914, Wissler (103:447) complained that the study of these subjects "has been quite out of fashion." Researchers were giving their attention to "language, art, ceremonies, and social organiza­ tion" in place of the former almost obsessive concentration on the minute description of techniques and artifacts, and on the tendency to study artifacts without rcgard for their social and cultural context. As I aim to show in this chapter, the anthropological study of technology and material culture is poised, finally, for a comeback, if in a different guise. Its findings may signifi­ cantly alter the way anthropologists analyze everyday life, cultural reproduc­ tion, and human evolution. If this all-but-forgotten field is to play such a role, it must overcome nearly a century of peripheral status. In anthropology's quest for professionalism, material-culture studies came to stand for all that was academically embarrass­ ing: extreme and conjectural forms of diffusionist and evolutionist explana­ tion, armchair anthropology, "field work" undertaken by amateurs on collecting holidays, and the simplistic interpretation of artifacts shorn of their social and cultural context. Malinowski, for instance, condemned the "purely technological enthusiasms" of material culture ethnologists and adopted an "intransigent position" that the study of "technology alone" is "scientifically sterile" (69:460). The study of technology and material culture, a topic that

573 citations


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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers in the topic in previous years
YearPapers
202326
202263
202125
202020
201924
201817